Nakhon Sawan Travel Guide

  • Big-Headed Clown Mingle With The Crowd
    Big-Headed Clown Mingle With The Crowd
    by somsakmah
  • Performers at the Night Parade
    Performers at the Night Parade
    by somsakmah
  • Decorations in front of BIG C, Nakhon Sawan
    Decorations in front of BIG C, Nakhon...
    by somsakmah

Nakhon Sawan Things to Do

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    A Quiet Prayer During Chinese New Year 1 more image

    by somsakmah Written Mar 7, 2013

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    Just like any other chinese community, when it comes to Chinese New Year, everyone dresses up in red (especially the women) and head to a temple to pray for blessings and good health.

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    Chinese New Year Decor along Highway 1 1 more image

    by somsakmah Updated Mar 7, 2013

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    Even though Chinese New Year is not a public holiday in Thailand, Nakhon Sawan celebrates this festival in a big way. Most likely this is because the majority of residents here are descendants of Chinese workers or traders who migrated from China, years ago. With Chinese New Year, the decorations along Highway 1 (Phahonyothin Road) goes up. The decorations here may not be as beautiful and grand as other predominantly Chinese countries such as Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and China, but it's a nice change if you still want to soak in a bit of Chinese New Year festivity in a simpler, more rural, and less crowded place.

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    Goddess Of Mercy Patting A Dragon 4 more images

    by somsakmah Written Mar 7, 2013

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    Chinese New Year is not a festival one would associate with Thailand, not in a big way anyway. But in Nakhon Sawan, they pull out all the stops to celebrate this festival. Their biggest Chinese New Year festivity is the day parade which start from the Nakhon Sawan Park to Sawanvitee Road, and then crisscrossing between Attakavee Road, Matulee Road, Kosi Road and Thanon Chaophraya, plus a couple of small connecting lanes in between whose names I couldn't really remember. One big difference between this day parade and the night parade is that shop or house owners would set up tables or alters along the streets where the parade pass by, and performers including the lion dancers would stop and dance or pray or say a few wishing-you-good-luck sentences at these altars. In return they get a 'red packet' containing money from the shop or house owner. The photographs here were taken in the morning of 13th-Feb-2013.

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