Ashgabat Things to Do

  • Earthquake Memorial, Ashgabat
    Earthquake Memorial, Ashgabat
    by SallyM
  • Nissa
    Nissa
    by SallyM
  • Azadi Mosque, Ashgabat
    Azadi Mosque, Ashgabat
    by SallyM

Best Rated Things to Do in Ashgabat

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    Arch of Neutrality

    by sachara Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    The Arch of Neutrality
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    The landmark of the citycentre of Ashgabat is the high Arch of Neutrality. At top of the arch is the 12 meter high gold polished statue of former president Niyazov, also called Turkmenbashi, meaning the leader of the Turkmens. This statue turnes every day 360 degrees so that Turkmenbashhi always faces the sun. The arch is raised as a symbol for a free and independent Turkmenistan, celebrating the Turkmen people endorsement of Turkmenbashi's policy of neutrality in 1998.

    It is possible to visit the arch for a small entrance fee. There is an elevator to bring you up. I didn´t, though you will have a good view at the independence Square ,the Presidential Palace and the rest of the citycentre. From the arch you are also able to make pictures of the Presidential Palace. The guards will not allow you to do so from the square below.

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    Kipchak Mosque

    by sachara Updated Sep 5, 2008

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    Kipchak Mosque
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    This Kipchak mosque, also called 'Turkmenbashi Ruhy Metjidi' is situated a bit outside Ashgabat town. This rather new mosque, built in 2001 by the president Niyazov, is one of the largest mosques in Central Asia. The minarets are 91 meter high. About ten thousand pilgrims can visit the mosque at the same time. Niyazov built this mosque at the place where his mother and tow brothers were killed by the earthquake of 1948.

    The mosque looks impressive by its scale, white marble and golden cupola's, but in some way it felt like the mosque misses the atmosphere and soul mosques usual have. It's peculiar, this mosque is the first mosque I ever visited which has no Arabic texts from the Koran. What is written inside the mosque is in the Turkmen language. They told me these are texts from the Ruhnama, the important Turkmen book written by president Niyazov. In this book he wrote his version of Turkmen history, culture and spirituality.

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    Russian market

    by sachara Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    vegetables
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    During our short stay in Ashgabat we had not the opportunity to visit the Tolkuchka Bazaar 8km north of town, because we were not there during marketdays. Maybe our visit to the Russian Market in the citycentre was not really an adequate substitute, but it was very pleasant and interesting to walk around at this lively market for some hours.

    I always like it to stroll around at markets to get a glimpse of daily life. At the Russian market they sell food like fresh vegetables, fruits, herbs, spices, bread, sweets, meat, but also alcoholic drinks and huge nicily decorated cakes. There werd also small shops selling clothes, books and colourful plastic baths and toys for playing in and with water.

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    Earthquake Memorial and Museum

    by sachara Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    Entrance of the museum with the memorial at top
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    The monument is dedicated to the victims of the earthquake of 1948. The Earthquake museum under the impressive sculpture contains touching displays of the terrible tragedy of 1948. There are pictures of pre-1948 earthquakes, the burying of the 110.000 bodies, information about the efforts to clean up the area during 5 years and the rebuilding of the city.

    The impressive bombastic bronze sculpture of the bull and globe is designed by sculptor B. Annarumadov. It is based on an ancient myth. The depicted child is said to be the baby Niyazov.

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    Ertogrul Gazi Mosque

    by sachara Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    Ertogrul Gazi Mosque
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    The Ertogul Gazi mosque in the citycentre of Ashgabat has a lovely oriental architecture. The appearance of the mosque shows the connection with the Ottoman and Turkish architecture. There is a obvious resemblance with the Süleymaniye Mosque or Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

    The mosque has four minarets. The inner court has nicily decorated ceilings (picture 3) and black-white ornaments (picture 1, 3 , 5). I liked the scenic views from the innercourt at the minarets (picture (4 & 5).

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    Monument for 10 years of independence

    by sachara Updated Sep 1, 2008

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    Monument for 10 years of independence
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    In the huge green area of Berzengi south of the citycentre not only huge white marble buildings are built in a spacious green setting, but it looks like that for every event a new monument is built.

    In 2001 at the 10th anneversary of the independence in 1991 a new monument is erected. When you enter the spacious area the first thing you see is a huge gold coloured staue of the president. And believe me this is not the only place in town where you will find his golden statue.

    There are also a lot of fountains all over the place like almost everywhere in this hot and dry city. In the 'lonely planet' I red that only the insane and very unfortunate will visit Ashgabat in summer. I was there in july and I survived, not only because of the fountains.

    The most important part of the monument is a huge fountain with horses at the top. This monument is at the same time a tribute to the famous Turkmen Akhal-Teke horses, being an important heritage of the country for a long time.

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    Tolkuchka Bazaar

    by bdwoot Written Jan 8, 2005

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    Playing dutar in the bazaar

    Set of north of town is a bazaar. Just saying the words doesn't really communicate the chaos, the scale, and the pure, unadulterated capitalism in a great socialist state. Lines of Ladas and UAZ russojeeps and Mercedes go in procession, park in an open field, and walk across to rows and neighborhoods of people hawking all and sundry.

    There are lines of carpet sellers, clothing stalls with obvious fake Guccis and poorly made exercise clothing with the endorsement of "Mike Tison" and "Mikeal Jordin" stitched on the jacket, people selling spices and vegetables, even cars, both new and used. One part of the bazaar was where you got a new car, a UAZ Russojeep with plastic still on the seats. Some guy closeby would sit with auto parts of various descriptions on a sheet of plastic.

    I was able to buy a few things on my own with my halting Russian, but if you are buying anything big ticket, go with a local. One of my friends from there is a shark among minnows when it comes to bartering. If the salesman even senses a westerner closeby, the price triples. My friend took it as a point of personal honor that she could get it as close to cost or below as possible. My guilt chip was firing like mad because here she was haggling over a few pennies while I made easily fifty times as much money as any one of them.

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    Monument for 11 years of independence

    by sachara Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    View from monument of 10 to the one of 11 years
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    When you return from the monument for 10 years of indepence and walk back to the street, you will see huge arches of white marble at the south side of the street.

    Believe it or not: this structure is built as monument in 2002 to celebrate eleven years of independence, as our tourguide told us. Every few months new white marble buildings and structures appear in the south Berzengi area of the city. Not of all our guide knew the meaning. Maybe it's is just the way how the public space in the south of Ashgabat is designed.

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    Independence Monument Garashyzlyk

    by sachara Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    Independence Monument Garashyzlyk
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    Ashgabat is the town of huge and ostentatious monuments with large and spacious parks around. Even if you don't like to visit monuments, you need at least to visit one or a few to look at the scale, ornaments, the fountains and details. It's part of Ashgabat´s appearance and culture anyway.

    This monument is told to be a symbol connecting the past and future of Turkmenistan. Around the central part, looking like a huge yurt with needle, you can see lots of dark statues of the heroes of Turkmenistan and fighters for the freedom of Turkmenistan.

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    The Silk Road

    by bdwoot Written Jan 1, 2005

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    From China to the west for two thousand years, goods crossed the desert from settlement to settlement. One of the largest stops was the city of Merv, now in eastern Turkmenistan. Very little remains of the city, some walls and a few ruined forts. But my oh my, what a place like no other I have seen.

    It once held 100,000 souls, a Zoroastrian city before the rise of Islam. Within its gates you could rest your camels and get a bed for the night. Then came Alexander the Great who conquered what then became known as Bactria. After several hundreds years of a very widely displaced Hellenistic veneer over nomadic lives, then came Islam. Other conquerors included the Persian Empire, the Mongols, and ultimately the Russians.

    What is left is eerie, empty and altogether moving.

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  • Akhal Teke Horses

    by gligor_kot Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Akhal-Teke is a horse from Turkmen, in the southern region of the modern country of Turkmenistan. These horses have been renowned as cavalry mounts and racehorses for some 3,000 years. The Akhal-Teke has superb natural gaits, and is the outstanding sporting horse from this area. The Akhal-Teke is native to an arid, barren environment. During its history, it has established a reputation of great stamina and courage. A key to the Akhal-Teke’s stamina is its diet which is low in bulk but high in protein, and frequently includes butter and eggs mixed with barley. Today the Akhal-Teke is used in show jumping and dressage in addition to daily use under saddle.

    Physical Description

    The Akhal-Teke's conformation can be favorably compared to the Persian Arab, another breed of ancient origin. Its head is similar to the Arab's, being long and light with expressive eyes. It has relatively long ears and a long neck. It has a short silky mane, or none at all, and a short tail. This breed has a narrow chest, long back, and flat ribs. The legs are long and slender, clearly revealing the tendons. It averages 15-15.1 hands in height. It is often dun in color, although it can be bay and gray, with a pale golden coat preferred. The Akhal-Teke is among the most elegant of the world's horses.

    Ancient Origins

    The Akhal-Teke descended from the ancient Turkmenian horse which was one of the four original horse 'types' that cross the Bering Strait from America in prehistoric times.. It was originally bred by tribes of Turkoman. The Akhal-Teke now is bred in the other provinces of the southern former U.S.S.R.

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    Turkmenbasi palace

    by traveloturc Updated Sep 21, 2008

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    Turkmenbasi palace

    Turkmenistan is Saparmurat Niyazov and Saparmurat Niyazov is the Turkmenbasi ( the leader of Turkmens) so the world and Ashgabat is turning around this personality.This is the palace of Turkmenbasi.Almost all buildigs carries his name..Now I am courious to know what will happen after his death...

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    earthquake

    by traveloturc Written Jul 21, 2006

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    earthquake monument

    Ashgabat earthquake on October 6 1948. An estimated 7.3 on the Richter scale, the earthquake killed over 110,000 (2/3 the population of the city).This monument is made for remember the victims.Dont worry saparmurat is not there ...

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    Nissa

    by SallyM Updated Jan 3, 2013

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    Nissa
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    The Parthian site of Nissa, near Ashgabat, is probably best not visited in the snow. However, as our time was limited, we had little choice in the matter. It was treacherously slippery on the site, particularly because we couldn’t see what was under the snow. What looked like heaps of snow were actually column bases.

    Nissa was founded in the 3rd century BC. Now it is a Unesco World Heritage site. The walls are made of mud brick, but they have been covered over for protection. In some places you can see where modern mud bricks have been used for resoration purposes and have been eroded by rain, unlike the originals.

    The site includes a circular hall which was believed to be a Zoroastrian fire temple ( a model reconstruction of this can be seen in the Ashgabat museum- it's probably best to go to the museun before visiting Nissa),

    We were show part of a decorative frieze/skirting. Most of it had now been covered up for protection after a tourist chipped a bit off as a souvenir. It was also possible to see the imprint of a wooden column in the mud wall. The colunn appeared to have been bound with rope for added strength.

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    Arch of Neutrality

    by traveloturc Updated May 14, 2009

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    turkmenbasi in gold

    Arch of Neutrality, which is a large tripod, upon which a golden statue of Turkmen President Saparmurat Niyazov. This statue rotates in order to always face the sun during daylight hours. It is said to be made of pure gold!!!))))

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