Samarkand Warnings and Dangers

  • Hotel President Currency Exchange Staff...Cheaters
    Hotel President Currency Exchange...
    by John195123
  • Shade in a tea house
    Shade in a tea house
    by SirRichard
  • Hotel President
    Hotel President
    by John195123

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Samarkand

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    Changing Money

    by John195123 Written Nov 8, 2008

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    Hotel President Currency Exchange Staff...Cheaters
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    You should get a receipt when changing money. There's a slight chance you might need it when leaving the country. We didn't, traveling overland into Kazakhstan, but they are good to have.

    When you change money, be careful where you do it. Even one of the bigger, better hotels tried to cheat us. At first, they didn't give us all the money. We counted and didn't come up with the number that we had added earlier (always figure out how much you should get ahead of time- don't leave home without knowing the exchange rates!). They asked to recount it, and added the remaining money the second time. If only there weren't cameras in that changing office... That was the Hotel President. I highly don't recommend going there. We went back in to get an exchange receipt, and they refused. When I got angry at them, accusing them of cheating us, they hastily complied. Don't bother going to the Hotel President.

    Two images.

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    Aeroflot, russian air company

    by Elisabcn Written Sep 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    40% of travellers that fly with aeroflot from Moscow to Central Asia loose their luggage. So bring a complete cabin luggage with you, do all the necessary reclaims before leaving the airport (and keep all the receipts of your reclaims) and take it easy. We were without luggage for 4days

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    Lonely Planet guidebook

    by Elisabcn Written Sep 1, 2007

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    When i do long trips I use to buy Lonely Planet guidebook. There is no guidebook about Uzbekistan so I bought "Central Asia" guidebook where, apart from Uzbekistan, you can find some information about Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Afghanistan.
    I have nothing to say about history and general information about the most important cities of Uzbekistan because more or less was the same our guide was telling us but some chapters like "women travellers" or "religion" are absolutely wrong. So don't worry, take it easy, Uzbekistan is a quiet country. Women can travel alone and they don't need to dress in a particular way, i saw lots of uzbek ladies wearing miniskirts

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    Don’t stumble – you might end in hospital

    by Trekki Written Jan 24, 2007

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    Samarkand, water draining channel
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    A lot of Central Asia’s cities (well, also others around the world) do have channels to transport water, either as water channels or for draining.
    Samarkand has several ones, which seem(ed) to serve for draining, but given the dry climate, they might not be filled with water very often. Plants grow in them, sometimes they are used as garbage places (but more by the tourists than by the locals – I found Uzbekistan cities very much clean, cleaner than a lot of cities in Germany).
    These water channels are not marked as such. So while you are wandering through town and maybe daydreaming, you might easily stumble into one.
    Well, also after a bit too much beer, they are still there…..

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    Do NOT send postcards from here !!!!!

    by Trekki Updated Jan 24, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As I consider this both, tourist trap and warning, I’ll double it. Please be fair to the system and if, only rate it once (either here or there – thanks).

    In our www world, I still love to send postcards from special travels to people dear to me, thus also from Uzbekistan.
    First, it was a bit tricky to find the post office (I was given several different locations), then I found it in Tashkent street (the pedestrian one between Registan and bazaar). With the help of a map, the girl even managed to understand my destinations, written in English, and I even saw how she put stamps on the cards………. but none ever arrived (correct me dear friends if one actually found its way to Sweden, Scotland, Germany, NZ or Australia).

    If you still want to send postcards – don’t even think to do it from Samarkand !!!! However, I cannot give a recommendation about which city actually sends cards; Tashkent maybe.

    Options:
    If you still want to send postcards to overseas’ friends, better buy cards and send them from home. If you want to send cards to nearby friends and family, better get them a nice souvenir.

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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    Luli (Gypsy) Beggars

    by lotharlerch Updated Apr 28, 2005

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    In general travelling is comfortable in Uzbekistan, you are not annoyed by beggars except around the principle sights of Samarkand where crowds of "Luli" are waiting for you in the surroundings of these places and they are almost as annoying as the - much more numerous - beggars in Morocco. But since Uzbekistan is not Morocco you can escape from them into the areas which are only accessible for entrance fees.

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    Beware of the heat

    by SirRichard Written Nov 19, 2004

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    Shade in a tea house

    Samarkand in summer is a rather hot and dry place, as is located in a desertic area.
    So bring a good hat, and drink a lot! A good place to look for shelter in the afternoon are the tea houses, where locals gather under the shades to enjoy a good tea and chat.

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    A rather safe place

    by SirRichard Written Nov 19, 2004

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    The Registan

    I never had the sense of insecurity while in Samarkand. The people was friendly and the place seemed pretty safe.
    Even at night, when the streets were a little deserted. I remember going walking to the Sound and Light show of Registan Square from our hotel and return walking too, late at night. You could see people chatting at their houses gates, looking for some freshness after the hot day. A very rural atmosphere...

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  • RB_Oakes's Profile Photo

    Phony Internet Cafes

    by RB_Oakes Written Aug 29, 2004

    I'm honestly not sure what the story is here, but you see a lot of places that bill themselves as Internet cafes, but when you go in they claim not to have it. This despite row upon row of computers. Invariably, these places are run by pre-pubscent terds who probably don't want you in there interfering with their video games and goofing off with their buddies.

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Samarkand Warnings and Dangers

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