Tashkent Transportation

  • Metro map
    Metro map
    by TheWanderingCamel
  • Tashkent Metro locations -on GE
    Tashkent Metro locations -on GE
    by Trekki
  • Transportation
    by nepalgoods

Most Recent Transportation in Tashkent

  • Green Line for Visa to Tashkent

    by Terry_Zheng Written Oct 21, 2013

    We are doing many shipments from China to Tashkent, So we'd like to go to Almaty and Tashkent by train from Urumchi.

    But first problem is Visa, as for the goverment policy. It's too hard for Chinese to get CIS countries Visa, we found our friend for us to make the invitation letter, and finally suceed..,

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    Plane

    by Klod5 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Antonov d'Uzbekistan Airways
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    Yuzhny Airport (IATA: TAS, ICAO: UTTT), also known as Tashkent Yuzhny Airport, is the largest airport in Uzbekistan, Yuzhny serves as the hub of Uzbekistan Airways.

    Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Uzbek President Islom Karimov in 1992 ordered the construction of a state airline. Uzbekistan Airways was formed with the intention of rebuilding the country's airports and transport infrastructure. Also planned from the outset was a strong presence in the international flight industry. This was characterised by the airline's maiden flight being from Tashkent to London, rather than a small domestic route.

    Domestic flights were launched using aircraft formally belonging to Aeroflot. When international routes became top priority, Airbus planes were leased, starting in 1993. The international fleet now uses a mixture of Boeing and Airbus airplanes.

    Uzbekistan Airways serves almost 50 destinations worldwide and at home from Tashkent. The airline owns 11 airports, 5 of which have International status. Uzbekistan Airways is not part of any partnerships or alliances.

    The Government of Uzbekistan has confirmed plans to offer a 49% share in the airline to foreign investors as strategic partners with full management control. The full terms of the privatisation will be confirmed later in 2007 and a preferred bidder selected in 2008. Russia's leading airlines are expected to be the most likely bidders

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    Taking the metro

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 4, 2009

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    Metro map
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    Like the metros in Moscow and St Petersburg on which it is based, Tashkent's underground railway system is fast, efficient, very cheap and worthy of being placed on any visitor's sightseeing list. The stations are all individually decorated in a style that reflects the name, with lots of marble, polished and sculpted stone, engraved glass, glazed ceramics, mosaics, chandeliers and handsome architectural features all part of the design.

    Begun in 1973 (7 years after the earthquake) and opened in 1977, this is the only underground railway system in Central Asia - though Almaty in Kazakhstan is on track to have one soon. There are 3 lines, 36 stations and 3 interchanges. Trains arrive at between 4 and 10 minute intervals. Both trains and stations are immaculately clean and well lit. There is always a police presence on the station and safety is not a concern.

    Frustrating as it is because each station really is quite spectacular, taking photographs is forbidden - I know that for certain, though the policeman who told me to put my camera away was extremely polite, didn't want a bribe or subject me to any of the other intimidating actions other travellers tell of. (The photos here are used with permission from a travel company's website)

    As Uzbekistan uses Latin script, using the metro is a much simpler affair now than it was in Soviet times when Cyrillic was used.

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  • VadimMyasnikov's Profile Photo

    Best Travel Deals in Tashkent

    by VadimMyasnikov Written Apr 12, 2008

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    Dear Traveller, or those who live in Tashkent,

    if you need to buy air tickets, plan a journey outside Uzbekistan,
    here ONLY two offices who can help.

    Lufthansa Ticketing Office
    Hotel InterContinental Tashkent
    Tel.: 120 74 01
    including Uzbekistan Airways tickets

    Carlos Wagonlit Travel
    132 67/8/9
    All sorts of Airlines Arrangements

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  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Trains

    by nepalgoods Updated Sep 27, 2007

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    Tashkent Train Station
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    Tashkent is the center for transportation to and around in Uzbekistan. I took the train from Tashkent to Bukhara leaving Tashkent at 8:00 p.m. and arriving in Bukhara around 7:00 a.m. I really enjoyed the train ride. I was lucky enough to have a bed in a two-berth compartement, which was very luxurious: clean sheets, a lunchbox, curtains. The bed was nice and comfortable. The dark wooden panels and the white curtains looked antique and reminded me of Orient Express.

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  • nepalgoods's Profile Photo

    Airport

    by nepalgoods Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Uzbekistan Airways

    Tashkent has an international airprt. There are flights to/from about 15 countries, mainly from other Centralasian cities, Russia and Europe. The airport is comparatively small. You are only allowed to enter it, when you are in the possession of a valid flight ticket. Busses and taxis have to stop about 300m in front of the entrance. So there is a distance, where oyu have to carry your luggage. There are boys, who have carts and transport your luggage for a bit of money to the entrance, where there is a security controll.

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    Getting around in Tashkent

    by nepalgoods Written Sep 25, 2007

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    To get around it is easy to take a bus, which go almost everywhere. I was quite surprised as the busses look very much like the ones in Hannover: they have the same green colour.

    There is also Central Aisa's only underground, which is very nice an dfast. The stations are beautifully designed.

    Of course you can also take a taxi.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Arriving in Tashkent

    by toonsarah Updated Sep 18, 2007

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    Tashkent Airport (photos STRICTLY forbidden!)

    Tashkent’s airport is located only 7 km from the city centre, and handles both international and domestic flights. We arrived here at 3.30 AM after a long journey, having had to change from a direct Uzbekistan Airlines flight to an Aeroflot one via Moscow only a few weeks before our holiday. This was apparently because the European Union refused to renew Uzbekistan Airlines’ license on safety grounds, which after our domestic flight with them to Khiva I understand!

    The quality you need most in dealing with customs and other procedures here is patience, followed closely by sharp elbows ;) I’ve described these in some detail on my Uzbekistan page, but to summarise here: after passport checks and collecting your bags (both of which will take some time) you’ll need to fill in a customs declaration form in duplicate. This asks for information about you, your journey and (in some detail) the value of what you are bringing into the country, including all currencies. Next you proceed through customs, where your bags will be X-rayed as if you were leaving already. Locals arriving on our flight had obviously cleaned all the electrical goods stores in Moscow, and this is where the sharp elbows come in as queuing is unheard of.

    We eventually made it through almost an hour and a half after landing. As we were travelling with a group we were met by the ever-helpful Marat and whisked to our hotel where we finally made it to bed at 5.45 AM ;)

    If you’re not on a tour, there are taxis available even at that time of night but be sure to agree a price beforehand as when you’re tired and newly arrived in a country it’s all too easy to be taken in by the many unofficial “taxi drivers” who frequent the airport. It shouldn’t cost more than $10 from airport to city centre so challenge anyone who wants to charge more. Alternatively if you arrive at a more civilised hour, buses connect with the metro to reach most central destinations.

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  • Pakistaniguy's Profile Photo

    English speaking Travel Agent

    by Pakistaniguy Written May 13, 2007

    I was looking for an English speaking travel agent to ask him about travelling in Uzbekistan cheaply. This guy was working in Abda Travel Company (that was the name of the travel agency) and he was helpful so i thought i should share this information with you all.

    Mr. Sanjar Khalmuradov
    Mobile: +998 (maybe u have to add 71) 1558867

    Office Address: Ground floor, Tashkent Palace Hotel
    56 Buyuk Turon Street, Tashkent.

    URL: http://www.abdatravel.uz

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Tashkent International & National Airport

    by Trekki Written Feb 2, 2007

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    Tashkent International Airport
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    Tashkent’s airport is located south of town, approx. 4 km off the city centre (Timur park). It is divided into national (east) and international (west) parts. Both don’t have very much of shopping or restaurant option (or I was too blind to find them), so be prepared.
    The shopping possibilities are not much more than small kiosks, but you get water, soft drinks, cigarettes and some overpriced souvenirs. I did not see a duty free shop, although the map lists one.
    Restaurants are mor of snack bars with sandwiches and sweets and the hard stuff of course (vodka, lol).

    Usbekistan Airways has several international, national and CIS flights – all info see weblinks below:

    Uzbekistan Airways International Flights

    Uzbekistan Airways National Flights

    Uzbekistan Airways CIS Flights

    Map of Arrival Hall of Tashkent Airport

    Map of Departure Hall of Tashkent Airport

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Central Asia’s only metro – don’t miss it !

    by Trekki Updated Jan 31, 2007

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    Tashkent's metro signals
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    Tashkent has the only metro in Central Asia. And it is not only an efficient way to get around in town, but does also beautiful artwork in each station.
    You have the choice between 3 lines: Chilonzor (red line, southwest to northeast), Uzbekistan (blue line, northwest to southeast), Yunusobod (green line; north-south), which do bring you to almost every point of interest. Most of the stations are huge, mainly the ones at the crossings. Note that the crossings’ stations do have different names, depending on the line. But the color code makes it easy to identify where to get off or where to go next. Names are all in Uzbek (not in Russian). Best you print out a map of the lines (see weblink below). I tried to get a map at the stations, but wasn’t successful. I don’t think it was because of my hardly existing command of Uzbek or Russian – they just don’t have that many plans to hand out.
    Connections are quick, cars are very clean and trains run each 10 minutes in all directions.

    One serious warning though: it is very much attempting to take pictures, but it is forbidden ! Policemen are everywhere, and you might face serious discussions and a fine if they catch you while photographing.

    Prices per ticket are 160 som (no matter how far you travel and how often you change trains, as long as you stay below surface).

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  • Wanderboy43's Profile Photo

    Buy a map and enjoy the METRO and TRAMS

    by Wanderboy43 Updated Oct 24, 2006

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    Clean as a whistle

    Tashkent is flat and easy to walk. I found quite a good map called "The Map of Tashkent". It includes a small Metro map and had the the streets of the city. As everyone mentions, the METRO stations are gorgeous. Trams around the city are in great condition and practical to use too. THe only problem is the high cost. The METRO, TRAMS, and BUSSES are 150 (15 US$ cents).

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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    The Metro - backbone of public transport

    by lotharlerch Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    Alisher Navoi Metro Station

    The Metro in Tashkent is cheap, clean, fast and efficient with some very interesting stations with gorgeous decorations. It is tempting to make pictures there, DO NOT TRY IT, IT IS FORBIDDEN. Nobody knows why this Soviet legacy still exixts but enjoy this pic and avoid any hassles with the police, they would destroy your film if they would detect it.

    Nobody has an idea why it is forbidden to take pics in the Metro. I took plenty of pics in the Moscow metro under the Soviet time and had no problems at all.

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  • mayafly's Profile Photo

    The Fabulous Tashkent Metro

    by mayafly Updated Jun 10, 2005

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    Unfortunately, the Tashkent Metro is still a work in progress, so there are still large areas of the city that are not accessible by metro. Progress seems to be stalled indefinitely - some of the unfinished beginnings of metro stations are now just underground passages where hawkers sell cheap wares.

    The metro is well worth a visit however; providing welcome respite from the heat, it can also be a good way to get across the city, depending on where you need to go. It's also clean, efficient, and safe.

    Buy a blue plastic token from the vendors at the windows when you go down into the station and put it into the turnstile (although they don't always work!). The fanatastic marble interiors are reminiscent of Moscow's metro, and like Moscow's metro unfortunately, photography is forbidden. Which makes it kind of cool, because you have to go there to see it...

    My favorite were the galactic cosmonauts at Kosmonavtlar.

    It's also interesting to note that the newest line of the metro (the green line - there are only 3) is all in Uzbek (no longer in Russian) and the letters are written in Latin characters, not in Cyrillic, evidence of Uzbekistan's nationalist leanings. Useful words are "Kirish" (enter), "Chikish" (exit), "mumkin" (you may) and "mumkin emas" (you may not).

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  • rsleisk's Profile Photo

    Central Asia's Only Subway!

    by rsleisk Updated Nov 7, 2004

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    Tashkent has the only subway system in Central Asia, and one of the cleanest, safest, and most reliable mass transit systems in the former Soviet Union. We road the subway from Chilanzar line and got off at the Peoples Friendship square.

    The ride offered a great opportunity for people watching as all sorts of persons got on and off. The car was clean and was in a retro Soviet style mid 70's marine blue.

    Tokens cost 10 sum, but there are rumors that this will increase shortly. The tokens are made of hard blue plastic, and are inserted into an entrance gate.

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Tashkent Transportation

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