One Pillar Pagoda, Hanoi

3.5 out of 5 stars 44 Reviews

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    One Pillar Pagoda (Chua Mot Cot)

    by sunnywong Written Feb 25, 2003

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    One Pillar Pagoda is a cultural and historic relic, built in 1049 and called Dien Huu. It was constructed Legends said that King Ly Thai To did not have any sons. One night the Goddess of Mercy in his dream sitting on a lotus gave him a son. Later he married a young country girl and had a successor. The king thanked the Goddess of Mercy by building this pagoda in the form of a lotus.

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 2, 2013

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    The One-Pillar Pagoda (Chua Mot Cot) is located between the Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum and the Ho Chi Minh Museum. The pagoda was built in 1049 (uncertain) and resembles a giant lotus blossom. According to a legend, King Ly Thai To was childless and dreamt one night that he met the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara (Goddess of Compassion), who handed him a baby son while seated on a lotus flower. The King later married a young woman and a son was born to them. As a symbol of gratitude, he had the pagoda built and dedicated it to the Goddess.

    The One-Pillar Pagoda is regarded as one of Vietnam's most iconic temples, but is quite small and only took a few minutes to visit. However, it’s free to visit the One-Pillar Pagoda, and if you go you should also visit the Dien Huu Pagoda and take a look at the bo tree, which was a gift to Ho Chi Minh during a visit to India in 1958.

    One Pillar Pagoda Bo Tree
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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by kenningst Updated Apr 13, 2008

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    Honestly, I was quite dissapointed with this pagoda as it is rather small and overly touristy but it is unique and I have yet to come across something similar. In addition, its free so I guess no harm visiting this place.

    Situated just beside the Ho Chi Minh Museum and open times from 6.00am till 6.00pm.

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by blanter Written Aug 26, 2006

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    A newcomer to SEA gets first excited about temples and pagodas, only to find several days later that they mostly look the same to an outsider and more advanced knowledge is required to make distinctions. This one is really special - a small wooden building is put on the top of a stone pillar in the middle of a lotus pond. The pagoda was built in 11th century, destroyed by the French in 1954, and restored afterwards.

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by mad4travel Written Apr 13, 2006

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    Now this is the kind of monument I like, it does what it says on the tin. Its a pagoda, and it sits on one pillar. Sorted!

    The One Pillar Pagoda is unique to Vietnam. Tradition says that it was first constructed in 1049 during the early Ly dynasty.

    Legend has it that King Ly Thai To dreamed of the goddess Quan Am sitting on a lotus leaf and offering him a son. Struck by the dream, the Emperor married a peasant girl who soon provided him with a male heir. In gratitude, the king built this pagoda to honor the goddess. Some have said that the pagoda resembles a lotus climbing out of the water.

    The pagoda was destroyed a number of times over the centuries, most recently in 1954 during the French Colonial retreat, but was reconstructed in its present form in 1955 with a concrete pillar. (practical, but not very romantic!)

    one pillar pagoda, Hanoi
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    Cute little Pagoda

    by gypsysoul73 Written Jun 29, 2006

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    The original One Pillar Pagoda (Chua Mot Cot) was destroyed during the French War so what you see is a reconstruction built in the 50s.

    The OPP was ordered by Emperor Ly Thai Tong to resemble a lotus blossom to commemorate the long awaited birth of an heir and to celebrate his good fortune which eh believed was bestowed upon him by the Buddhist goddess of mercy.

    People now come to the pagoda to pray for fertility and other blessings of good health.

    One pillar pagoda Steps leading up to the One Pillar Pagoda
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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by bchurchill Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    This is approx 200 meters from the Ho Chi Minh mausoleum. It was originally build in 1049 by King Ly Thai Tong. The King had a dream of the Godess of Merc leading him to Lotus flower. It is said that the Pagoda was buit in the shape of a lotus blossuming onto its stem. If you and your wife pray to the One Pillar Pagoda, you will be blessed with a male child just as the King was.

    I guess it looks like a Lotus?

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    One PIllar Pagoda

    by leffe3 Updated Feb 21, 2006

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    Famed as one of the symbols of Hanoi, and part of the Ho Chi Minh complex, the pagoda is a sad copy of the original. Built in 1049, the original was blown up by the French prior to quitting 'Indochine' in the 1950s.

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by lyrad Written Oct 2, 2005

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    The One Pillar Pagoda is located just a short distance away from the Mausoleum and is designed to represent a lotus blossom. Unfortunately the original wooden structure was destroyed by the French in the 1950s and this newer concrete version lacks character.

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  • bsfreeloader's Profile Photo

    Icon of Hanoi

    by bsfreeloader Written May 21, 2007

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    For whatever reasons, One Pillar Pagoda, which can be found very near Ho Chi Minh’s house, has become an iconic symbol of Hanoi. This unspectacular pagoda is easy enough to visit while touring the other sites around Ba Dinh Square.

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by cal6060 Written Jul 25, 2011

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    One Pillar Pagoda is a small pagoda with one pillar in the middle if a lotus pond. This unique pagoda was built by an emperor Ly Thai Tong, ruled Vietnam between 1028-1054, to gratitude Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara to gave him a new born son as he was dreaming Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara while seated on a lotus flower handed him a baby son. This Pagoda is built of wood on a single stone pillar 1.25m in diameter and it is designed to resemble a lotus blossom.

    It was rebuilt after it was destroyed by the french.

    It is located west of Hanoi, 500m from Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum.

    Opening hours 8am-5pm.

    One Pillar Pagoda, Hanoi One Pillar Pagoda, Hanoi One Pillar Pagoda, Hanoi
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    Local Landmark

    by JessieLang Written Feb 20, 2011

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    The One Pillar Pagoda was originally built in the 11th Century. The story goes that the king wanted a son. After he dreamed about the Lady Buddha, his wife gave birth to a boy, and he built this little pagoda in appreciation. It is the smallest one in Viet Nam.

    It rises from a pond on a single concrete pillar, and is supposed to represent a lotus. It isn’t original—the French blew it up in the 1950s, and it was rebuilt.

    Open 8-5, free.

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    Quan Yin with Many arms

    by anoum Written Dec 18, 2007

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    When I visited this place, I did not know the legend behind it, ok? I climbed up the stairs and saw a beautiful Quan Yin with many arms inside. I offered my respect like the locals before going down to explore the temple in front of it. The locals had just finished a ceremony and were tidying up the place. When my friends and I walked into the compound of the temple, we saw people seated on benches at tables with food. We paid our respects in the temple. Friendly devotees offered us food. We found they were vegetarian food made from soya and peas. Some were quite delicious.

    Quan Yin with Many Arms Deity in temple Friendly devotees Vietnamese vegetarian food
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    an arcitectual lotus flower

    by bumpychick Written May 1, 2007

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    The One Pillard Pagoda is located close to Ho Chi Minh's mausoleum. It is a very popular tourist attraction, which makes it hard to get a 'tourist free' photo. However, it is a very pretty building and well worth a visit. It was built by King Ly Thai Tong (102 -54) and is the shape of a lotus flower, with the pillar being it's stem.... use your imagination!

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    One Pillar Pagoda

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 1, 2004

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    The unique One Pillar Pagoda originally dates back to the 11th Century when it was constructed by King Ly Thai Tong. This tiny wooden structure sits perched on a single concrete pillar in a small pond. The current building was completed in 1954 after the French destroyed the previous pagoda upon their departure from Vietnam that same year.

    One-Pillar Pagoda This version of the pagoda was in Halong Bay
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