Presidential Palace, Hanoi

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  • The presidential palace in Hanoi.
    The presidential palace in Hanoi.
    by cachaseiro
  • Presidential Palce
    Presidential Palce
    by NYTim
  • Presidential Palace
    Presidential Palace
    by NYTim
  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    The presidential palace.

    by cachaseiro Written Apr 13, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The presidential palace in Hanoi.

    The presidential palace is located right next to the Ho Chi Minh mausoleum and the little house on stilts that Ho Chi minh lived in.
    Ho chi Minh refused to live in the presidential palace when he was president and and build a little wooden house on stilts in the garden instead but these days the president of Vietnam has no problem living a luxury lifestyle way above the average vietnamese citizen.
    The entrance to the palace also covers the visit to the house on stilts so it's worth going there even if you can not enter.
    The palace is in a quite nice old colonial building but it has been painted in a fairly ugly yellow color that makes it look a little crappy if you ask me.
    You can not enter the palace but view it from the outside on the way to Ho Chi Minhs house which is down in the backyard.

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    The Presidential Palace

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 2, 2013

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    The Presidential Palace
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    The Presidential Palace, built from 1900 to 1906, is located next to Ho Chi Minh’s Mausoleum and used to be the Headquarters for the Governor General of Indochina. After the French were defeated, in 1954, Ho Chi Minh didn't want to live in the Presidential Palace, instead he lived in two humble houses on the Palace’s ground (read my other tips). Nowadays the Palace is used for international meetings, and is not open for public. But you can have a look from outside, and the Palace Garden with the large fishpond is also a nice place for a walk.

    Don’t try to take any pictures from outside the front gate. Before I paid the entrance fee I wanted to take a picture from outside, but was stopped by the guards. After I paid the fee I could take as many pictures of the Palace as I wanted...

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Ho Chi Minh's Vestige

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 2, 2013

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    House-on-stilts
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    After the French were defeated, in 1954, Ho Chi Minh denied staying in the Presidential Palace. Instead he lived and worked in two humble houses on the Palace’s ground. First he stayed in “the House of 1954” from 1954 to 1958. Thereafter, he built a Vietnamese house made of stilt ("the House-On-Stilts") and lived there from May 1958 to September 1969.

    You are not allowed to enter the houses, but they are both quite open and have big windows, so you can still get an impression of Ho Ch Minh’s simple lifestyle.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Former French Governor-General of Indochina house

    by Willettsworld Written May 15, 2010

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    Located to the north of Ho Chi Minh’s Mausoleum, this wonderful building was built between 1900 and 1906 to house the French Governor-General of Indochina. When Vietnam achieved independence in 1954, Ho Chi Minh refused to live in the grand structure for symbolic reasons, although he still received state guests there, and he eventually built a traditional Vietnamese stilt house. Don't try and get a photo of it from the front gates on the main road as the guards won't like it.

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  • kenningst's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace

    by kenningst Updated Apr 13, 2008

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    There is nothing special about the Presidential Palace as you are not allowed to enter but it is situated beside the Ho Chi Minh Masouleum and I saw it on my way to the Quan Thanh temple. It is nice to just have a look and grab a picture.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace & Ho Chi Minh Museum

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Mar 29, 2008

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    Ho Chi Minh Museum

    Though the Presidential Palace is closed to the public, you can enter its grounds and visit Ho Chi Minh's House. The palace was constructed by the French in 1901 and Ho's house was built in 1954.

    Nearby is the the Ho Chi Minh Museum which was completed in 1990 with the help of Soviet money. It opened on the 100th anniversary of Ho's birth, and it contains numerous items from the man's life, celebrating socialism.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Mustard yellowy colour building

    by fachd Updated Mar 28, 2008

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    After the cyclo driver drop us, we headed towards Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum. Along the way we couldn’t help of noticing this yellowy mustard colour building. To our astonishment it was the Presidential Palace. Unfortunately it’s not open to general public. You can walk around the grounds and take photos from outside of the beautiful French colonial building.

    Yes you can tell the French colonial power was here in Hanoi. The Palace is French contribution of great architecture to Vietnam. The Palace was built between 1900 and 1906 for the French Governor General in Indochina.

    After the defeat of the French by the Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh refused to live at the Palace; instead he built a modest cottage on the palace grounds and resided for four years. He was a true people’s leader and a simple man with a simple lifestyle.

    Today the Palace is used by the President of Vietnam for Government meetings and official receptions. Ambassadors to Vietnam from different countries will give their credentials at the Palace.

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  • anoum's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace

    by anoum Written Dec 16, 2007

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    Graceful arches
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    While my friends and I were walking away from the Ho Chi Min Mausoleum, we came across this building. At that time, I did not know what it was but was impressed by its graceful architecture and took photos of it.

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  • bcatton's Profile Photo

    Interesting and tranquil place to visit.

    by bcatton Updated May 13, 2007

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    Presidential Palace.
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    The Presidential Palace was built at the turn of the 19th century (1901) for the governor-general of Indochina. Unfortunately it's closed to the general public and is now used to receive visiting heads of state. (Very interesting how they do not allow anyone to stand on the footpath outside and take photo's of the building, you have to stand across the street to photograph the building?!). You can however view it and the grounds while visiting Ho Chi Minh's house....
    Opening times are, Tue - Thus & Sat - Sun; 7.30am - 11am, 2pm - 4pm.

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  • woosoowei's Profile Photo

    Uncle Ho's Vestige

    by woosoowei Written Apr 14, 2007

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    Presidential palace, Hanoi

    The Palace itself is a magnificent yellow building. It was formerly used as Indochina's Governor Palace. However it's heavily guarded and you can just view it across a lawn.

    The whole of presidential palace area is a large garden consists of the palace, a garage, a house uncle Ho lived during his 60s and the House on Stilts where he lived during his 70s, these structures are surrounding a pond in the middle. If you have a lot of time to spare, there's mango road and fruit garden to wonder around.

    Try to find a tree that grow from two trunks but joined at the branches about 40ft high ;-) It's before the garage.

    Entrance fee: VND5,000
    Open 7.30am to 11am and 2to4pm during summer
    Open 8am to 11am and 1.30to4pm during winter
    Open daily except Monday and Friday afternoon

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace

    by victorwkf Written Mar 2, 2007

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    Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

    The Presidential Palace is a very impressive building located just beside tha famous Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum of Hanoi. This place is closed to the public but you can take photographs from the outside. It was built in 1906 and was home to several director-generals of Indochina and is now used by the President of Vietnam. For the last 15 years of his life, Ho Chi Minh used this Presidential Palace for government council and receiving guests, but he refused to stay there because of his simple lifestyle.

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  • yeikloen's Profile Photo

    See Uncle Ho's Old House

    by yeikloen Written Dec 6, 2006
    Presidential Palace
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    I would suggest to pay 10,000D by walking past this palace compound to collect your baggage if you left it before you enter the ho chi minh mausoleum. Here I do not think you can see the palace but you will be able to view HCM house, both concrete and wooden stilt as well as the precious peugeot.

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  • SLLiew's Profile Photo

    French Palace & Vietnamese Stilt House

    by SLLiew Written Aug 14, 2006

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    Presidential Palace with a golden glory

    After exiting Ho Chi Minh's Mausolem, I see the beautiful Presidential Palace which was legacy of France as it was built for the Governor General of French Indochina.

    Interestingly next to it is a spartan traditional stilt house where Uncle Ho was said to spend most of his time there instead of at the Palace. There is a constant stream of local tourists to view these two important symbolic buildings.

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  • travie's Profile Photo

    Colonial Architecture

    by travie Updated Mar 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Presidential Palace

    The Presidential Palace is just around the corner from where Ho Chi MInh now rests. The area sourrounding the palace is packed full of nice walks and gardens. It is a good example of one of the many colonial buildings that can be seen in Hanoi. No public entry :( Just next to the Presidential Palace is the 'house on stilts' where it was reported that Ho Chi Minh once lived. Not as eye-catching as the Presidential Palace but a interesting look at the life of Ho Chi Minh.

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Presidential Palace

    by aukahkay Written Mar 8, 2006
    Presidential Palace, Hanoi

    The Presidential Palace of Vietnam, located in the city of Hanoi, was built between 1900 and 1906 to house the French Governor-General of Indochina. It was constructed by Auguste Henri Vildieu, the official French architect for Vietnam. Like most French colonial architecture, the palace is distinctively European- the only visual cues that it is located in Vietnam at all are mango trees growing on the grounds. The striking yellow palace stands behind wrought iron gates flanked by sentry boxes. It incorporates elements of Italian Renaissance. Today, the Presidential Palace houses the office of the President of Vietnam.

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