Hoi An Things to Do

  • ENTRANCE TO BRIDGE
    ENTRANCE TO BRIDGE
    by davidjo
  • CHINA BEACH
    CHINA BEACH
    by davidjo
  • The japanese bridge in Hoi An.
    The japanese bridge in Hoi An.
    by cachaseiro

Most Recent Things to Do in Hoi An

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    Visit MY SON CHAM HOLY LAND

    by balhannah Updated Apr 11, 2011

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    scenery on way to My Son
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    Do a tour to My Son. The scenery is good on the way there, passing by many fields of Rice, and lovely mountain views.

    At My Son, the guide told my group about the site, then we had about 1.5hours to look around on our own, this was plenty of time.
    On the way back, I came back by boat, ( you have a choice, either boat or bus) we stopped at a carpentry village. I didn't find it very interesting at all.

    Back in the Boat again, we happened to pull up beside a Fisherman as he is throwing his net into the water. Guess what.... He had a fish, but it was dead and on a piece of string, a set up for the tourist's. Of course he came alongside the Boat with his hand held out wanting money for the demonstration!

    This was the end of the tour, and we were dropped off at the markets, and you find your own way back to your hotel.
    A good tour.

    It cost me $10us,(2008).......
    this included bus, boat, and basic lunch of rice, banana and water.

    It did not include the entrance fee of 60,000dong.

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    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    Boat trip to Cham Island

    by balhannah Updated Apr 11, 2011

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    local in basket boat
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    A tour to Cham Island is a nice days outing.

    I was picked up by bus and taken to a port where I boarded the boat. I could sit downstairs or up on the top open deck, this is what I did, as I'd rather take photo's from there than from behind glass.
    I was given a bottle of Water and 2 cup cakes for breakfast, [nice!] and these were FREE!
    The trip to the island took about 1.5 hours. It was quite interesting as lots of fishing boats with their fishing nets were out on the water.

    The town on the island is in a pretty little cove. Lots of basket boats are here and the people don't pressure you to buy like in Hoi an, a nice respite. It was enjoyable watching the locals get on with their life.
    We went out on the boat for snorkelling, a bit cold and windy the day we went. Onto another nice secluded cove, just our group for lunch and rest and recreation on a sandy beach with palm trees, this was so lovely!

    Then it was time to return to the Boat, and head back to the mainland, where a bus took me back to my Hotel.

    A word of warning for the trip back.....
    The wind had come up and the sea was very rough, so if you suffer from sea sickness, take some tablets with you.
    Also, everybody was frozen, except for me, as I took a cardigan with me, and even that was not quite warm enough. There was nowhere to get away from the cold wind! Take something warm with you, even in warmer weather, as the return trip may be cold!

    In 2008, I paid $19 for this tour after checking with many travel agencies. Check around, as prices DO VARY!
    I see a tour in 2011 cost $32us......including lunch, but this is by speedboat which is the faster boat.

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    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Tran Family Shrine

    by Willettsworld Updated Apr 4, 2011
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    Tran Tu Nhac, an intelligent mandarin who lived during the reign of King Gia Long (around 200 years ago), built this house. In late 1802, he and some others were sent to China as the King's envoys. Before departure, he wanted to leave something to his offspring and show his gratitude towards his ancestors. So he had this house built. Like other family chapels in Hoi An, the Tran house is situated in the middle of a 1,500 sq m garden with high surrounding walls and a gate. Ornamental plants. flowers, fruit trees and several century-old plants are grown in the front. The architecture of the house bears the Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese styles, and it has remained almost the same as two centuries ago. The house is made of precious wood and is composed of three compartments and two lean-tos. Its roof is covered with pan-tiles. The wood, columns and beams are decorated with refined carvings. The house is divided into two parts: the main one is used as the worshipping place, and the other one, as the living space for the clan's head and for receiving guests.

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    Halong Bay Cruise

    by kateandseb Updated Apr 4, 2011

    We went on a 3 day 2 night cruise through Handspan on the Dragon Pearl. It was a great 3 days. I would recommend going for a more expensive tour (Such as through handspan) because what you pay for is what you get. The boat we were on was great, although the service wasn't 5 star quality (one of our friends dropped a glass and had to pay for it. And eating seafood for lunch and dinner for 3 days wore a bit thin. We chose the kayaking option and spend one day exploring Halong Bay with the help our tour guide, Ngoc (who was great).

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    • Kayaking
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Cruise

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    take a cooking class

    by ellielou Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    dissecting squid at the market
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    I've never taken a cooking class, but the one at the Red Bridge Cooking school was highly recommended, and I figure, well, I love Vietnamese food, so what a fun thing to do!

    The classes are held twice during the day, a morning and an evening. You meet at a restaurant, have a morning appropriate beverage, take a tour of the nearby market, take a boat trip on the river to the cooking school, learn about Vietnamese herbs from the cooking school's garden, watch the chef cook, try your hand at cooking yourself, eat, and then take the boat ride back to town. (Well, that's for most people. The chef decided to take me around, so I went back into town via motorbike...a bit more fun, really!)

    Now, about the cooking: Despite being an unrepentant 'foodie,' I have learned that I should never think of changing my career and trying to enter culinary school, but it was fun all the same.

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    • Food and Dining

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    Cross The Japanese Covered Bridge

    by kelnsha Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Japanese Covered Bridge
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    Hoi An most famous landmark variously known as the Pagoda Bridge, the Faraway People's Bridge and popularly known as the Japanese Covered Bridge (Cau Nhat Ban). Its popular name reflects a long-standing belief that it was built by the Japanese although no documentary evidence exists to support this. It was built in the 16th century, perhaps even earlier. On its north side, there is a pagoda, Japanese in style, for the protection of sailors. Statues represent 2 dogs at the west end and 2 monkeys at the east; it is said that the bridge was begun in the year of the monkey and finished in the year of the dog. Scholars have pointed out that this would mean a 2 years period of construction, an inordinately long time for such a small bridge and maintain that the 2 animals represent points of the compass, WSW (monkey) and NW (dog). Father Benigne Vachet, a missionary who lived in Hoi An between 1673 and 1683, noted in his memoirs that the bridge was the haunt of beggars and fortune tellers hoping to benefit from the stream of people crossing over it.

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  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    Japanese Bridge

    by JessieLang Updated Mar 2, 2011

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    Japanese Bridge
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    The bridge was built by the Japanese trading community in the early 17th Century to link them with the Chinese quarter on the other side of a small stream. (It has been rebuilt--it's not all original.)

    There are guardians at both ends of the bridge—One side has a pair of dog gods; the other end has a pair of monkey gods. There's also a shrine in the center of the bridge.

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    Fish market

    by Dolevm Updated Sep 29, 2010
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    For those who can not sleep at five in the morning. At this time the fishermen bring the fish spoil of the night to a small pier at the end of the local market. Commotion, shouting, sights, and especially the smells - impressive. one can walk and take a lot of pictures.

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  • vickigb's Profile Photo

    Private Tour

    by vickigb Written Sep 16, 2010
    China Beach
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    We recommend Hoi An Buffalo Travel if you are looking to arrange some activities.

    We organised two trips. The first was a car and driver to take us to Da Nang and surrounding areas. We visited Marble Mountain - what a climb, it is certainly not for the faint hearted, but the views and temples make it worthwhile. After leaving Marble Mountain we went to the Cam Museum to look at Cam artifacts, it was interesting and doesn't take long to view. We followed this my a trip to a shopping centre (only about 12 stores) in comparison to western standards very minimal and not alot of selection. the next few hours were spent at China Beach lazying on a sunbed watching the world go by, without only one or two others around. It was lovely and peaceful.

    our second trip was by far the best, Vu - the owner of Buffalo Travel arranged for a car to collect us from our hotel and drive us to the Pottery Village, after a guided tour and an attempt at making a pot be then boarded a charter boat for a trip down Hoi An River. Our captain was Yen, and he was fantastic and made the trip so enjoyable. We stopped off at the Carpentry Village and visited a couple of local families making wonderful timber pieces - one family was even making boomerangs for export to Australia!

    We continued our journey down the river and past the Hoi An markets. We observed fishermen at work and finally met Vu at his family village to enjoy lunch with his family. This was brilliant, the hospitality was generous and warm and it was wonderful to be immersed in local culture. Vu's family were very welcoming and prepared a wonderful feast for us to enjoy.

    We loved the whole day and it has to be one of the best memories we will take home of our trip to Hoi An. So if you are ever in Hoi An and looking for something to do, the please speak to Vu.

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    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

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  • A great way to visit My Son heritage.

    by lodenius Updated Sep 13, 2010

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    My Son is indeed very beautiful and a big thank you to all staff for making our stay here a wonderful one. We booked a trip to My Son and cooking class with Cinnamon Cruise. The cruise was very relaxing and the guide was very professional and knowkledgeable. The cooking class has been fabulous and it was very nice to visit a local market . The trip was spectacular for exceeded our expectation. We will definitely tell more people to take this.

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    • Food and Dining
    • Cruise

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  • A great way to visit My Son heritage.

    by lodenius Written Sep 13, 2010
    My Son and cooking class

    My Son is indeed very beautiful and a big thank you to all staff for making our stay here a wonderful one. We booked a trip to My Son and cooking class with Cinnamon Cruise. The cruise was very relaxing and the guide was very professional and knowkledgeable. The cooking class has been fabulous and it was very nice to visit a local market . The trip was spectacular for exceeded our expectation. We will definitely tell more people to take this.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Cam Kim Island

    by Willettsworld Written May 8, 2010

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    Cam Kim Island is located about 2km southwest of Hoi An and can be visited by taking a ferry from the pier just to the east of the market along Bach Dang. Departures are frequent - a lot of people live on the island and this is their only way to and from Hoi An town. I came here as part of a day tour I did which involved taking in the temples at My Son in the morning and visiting the island in the afternoon. Once you get off the pier on Cam Kim Island, a few hundred metres along the pier road, you'll start to see wood-carving shops, with artisans at work and merchandise on display. You'll also see boatbuilding using traditional methods.

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    My Son

    by Willettsworld Written May 8, 2010

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    My Son (pronounced Mee Sun) is a Hindu temple complex, located in the village of Duy Phú, 69km southwest of Da Nang. It comprises many Champa temples, in a valley roughly two kilometres wide, surrounded by two mountain ranges. It was the site of religious ceremony of kings of the Champa dynasty, and was also a burial place of Champa royals and national heroes between the 4th and 14th centuries. The temple complex is one of the foremost temple complexes of Hinduism in South East Asia and is the foremost heritage site of this nature in Vietnam. As of 1999, My Son has been selected by UNESCO as a world heritage listed site as a foremost evidence of Asian civilisation which is now extinct.

    Altogether there are around 70 temples and tombs here which were studied, in 1899, by Henri Parmentier. He classified them into 14 groups, including 10 principal groups each consisting of multiple temples. For purposes of identification, he assigned a letter to each of these principal groups: A, A', B, C, D, E, F, G, H, K. Within each group, he assigned numbers to the edifices comprising it. Thus "My Son E1" refers to the edifice at My Son belonging to group "E" that has been assigned the number "1." All of the temples and tombs are pretty small and in various states of repair and condition due to neglect and after the Americans carpet-bombed the region in August 1969. Although they're not as impressive as the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, they're still well worthy of a visit from Hoi An. I came here as part of a day tour from Hoi An which also included taking a boat back to Hoi An, lunch and a visit to Cam Kim Island which cost 110,000 VND with Sinh Cafe. More info and photos can be found on my My Son page below:

    Admission: 60,000 VND

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    Cua Dai Beach

    by Willettsworld Written May 8, 2010

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    Four kilometres east of Hoi An centre stretches Cua Dai Beach, over 3km in length and up to 300m wide. The beach boasts fine white sand and is ideal for recreational activities like swimming and other sea sports. In the shady palm-lined road bordering the beach stand some large seaside resorts such as Hoi An Beach Resort or Victoria Resort. I hired a bicycle and cycled here along the main road from the town but there was a strong wind blowing in my face from the sea which put an end to any sunbathing I had in mind (well it was January and this is the cooler, wilder season as far as the climate goes, here).

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    • Beaches

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    Hoi An Cathedral

    by Willettsworld Written May 8, 2010

    The only spectacular thing about this Catholic cathedral is its resilience. Originally built in 1903, the structure was rebuilt in 1964 with the influx of greater numbers of Catholics seeking refuge from persecution in the North. If you go, have a look at the cool contemporary stained glass depicting the early French missionaries alighting in Hoi An.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

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Hoi An Things to Do

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