Hoi An Things to Do

  • ENTRANCE TO BRIDGE
    ENTRANCE TO BRIDGE
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  • CHINA BEACH
    CHINA BEACH
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  • The japanese bridge in Hoi An.
    The japanese bridge in Hoi An.
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Best Rated Things to Do in Hoi An

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    Visit MY SON CHAM HOLY LAND

    by balhannah Updated Apr 11, 2011

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    scenery on way to My Son
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    Do a tour to My Son. The scenery is good on the way there, passing by many fields of Rice, and lovely mountain views.

    At My Son, the guide told my group about the site, then we had about 1.5hours to look around on our own, this was plenty of time.
    On the way back, I came back by boat, ( you have a choice, either boat or bus) we stopped at a carpentry village. I didn't find it very interesting at all.

    Back in the Boat again, we happened to pull up beside a Fisherman as he is throwing his net into the water. Guess what.... He had a fish, but it was dead and on a piece of string, a set up for the tourist's. Of course he came alongside the Boat with his hand held out wanting money for the demonstration!

    This was the end of the tour, and we were dropped off at the markets, and you find your own way back to your hotel.
    A good tour.

    It cost me $10us,(2008).......
    this included bus, boat, and basic lunch of rice, banana and water.

    It did not include the entrance fee of 60,000dong.

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    TAN KY ANCIENT HOUSE

    by balhannah Written Oct 10, 2009

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    Inside Tan Ky ancient house
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    This certainly doesn't give an impression of anything worth seeing from the outside, but inside, its a different matter, nice and interesting.

    It was built nearly 200 years ago. The owner of the house has preserved its interior design and old furniture, as well as many relics of the prospering trade and cultural exchanges among the Vietnamese, Chinese and Japanese in the late 17 century.

    The person who built the house was a Minh Huong (a Chinese native) who came to Vietnam to do business in the 17th century. Seven generations of owners have successively lived here. The house was built from traditional materials, influenced by Chinese and Japanese styles. It is charming and elegant.

    The front hall used to be a shop selling cinnamon, tea, silk, wood and medicines obtained from rare animals' bones.

    The second compartment is the centre of the house. It is bigger than the first one, and it used to be a guest room, but today its used for worshipping as well as receiving guests.

    On 17th February 1990 Tan Ky house was listed as a national historical vestige.

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    PHUNG HUNG HOUSE

    by balhannah Written Oct 10, 2009

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    Phung Hung Old House

    In a lane full of beautiful buildings, the old Phung Hung Old House stands out. It's still a family home, having housed eight generations over 226 years.
    The House is over 100 years old, has unique architecture, with high wooden ceilings and large corridors.
    Here you will find information about the lifestyle of merchants who lived in Hoi An, a long time ago.

    On the 29th of June 1993 the house was listed as a national historical vestige.

    Its worth a wander through, some souvenirs, various handicrafts and hand embroidery is on sale here.

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    UNESCO World Heritage Site: Hoi An Ancient Town

    by cal6060 Written Jul 31, 2011

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    Hoi An Ancient Town, Vietnam
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    Ho An is an ancient town with many impressive old architectural buildings, the Cham Nam river divided the town into two areas, the local rich tradition, and historical with settlers' remnants. This town is already famous with tourists from all over the world. Most of the Vietnam travelling video guide will cover this part of Vietnam. You can spend days covering the area with museum, architectures, foods, history, cultures, arts and many more. Overall, it is a beautiful town like living in the past.

    Visit Hoi An Bookstore to buy book to learn more about this town.

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    Sights and Sounds and Smells....the Market..

    by Greggor58 Written Feb 27, 2010

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    COLOUR...The Market,Hoi An,Vietnam.
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    This is certainly a portion of the HEART and SOUL of Hoi An…I say a portion because I think in addition to the market area of Hoi An…the river also plays a significant role in the heartbeat of the city…

    In any event…THE MARKET is a bustling, lively, and colorful MUST see when you’re in town…just to browse the many stalls of goods available...vegetables, eggs, the noodle maker, the lady selling salt by the bag or the man carving wooden Buddha’s …you’ll need to dodge motorbikes and people on bicycle … prepare yourself if you’re in someone’s way to get a strong finger in the small of your back to get you to move out of the way..Ha…It happened a couple of times to me…

    There’s a section sort of off on its own where the fish mongers are at work…buying and selling. but if you arrive after early morning its mostly just selling…

    The smells, the noises, the color all make it a really interesting spot to hang out for a while.
    Just be warned that it’s a busy spot and you really need to keep your wits about you…

    I visited a few times…as this was a way to cut through to our favorite lunch spot.,. the Banana Café…

    You likely cant help but find the market…its along the waterfront street…on Bac Dang Street just West of the bridge that goes over to Can Nam Island…

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    take a cooking class

    by ellielou Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    dissecting squid at the market
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    I've never taken a cooking class, but the one at the Red Bridge Cooking school was highly recommended, and I figure, well, I love Vietnamese food, so what a fun thing to do!

    The classes are held twice during the day, a morning and an evening. You meet at a restaurant, have a morning appropriate beverage, take a tour of the nearby market, take a boat trip on the river to the cooking school, learn about Vietnamese herbs from the cooking school's garden, watch the chef cook, try your hand at cooking yourself, eat, and then take the boat ride back to town. (Well, that's for most people. The chef decided to take me around, so I went back into town via motorbike...a bit more fun, really!)

    Now, about the cooking: Despite being an unrepentant 'foodie,' I have learned that I should never think of changing my career and trying to enter culinary school, but it was fun all the same.

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    Southeast Asian fairytale: Sunset in Hoi An

    by King_Golo Written Jun 28, 2005

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    Tung, rowing in Hoi An

    When in Hoi An, don't miss going to the river in the early evening. You can rent a rowing boat just next to the market hall (appr. VND 10.000-15.000). Look out for Tung - he's a friendly and funny guy (if you can make out what he wants to say...), and he'll row you around for about an hour. Try to do this shortly before the sunset and you'll feel like gliding on liquid gold. Another good place to be is Cam Nam Bridge. It's the big bridge that is open to cars, too. From Cam Nam Bridge, you'll have a wonderful view onto the market and its hustling and bustling. In the soft evening light, this view could be from a southeast Asian fairytale! Watch the vendors calling for potential customers, washing their lettuce or having a chat with their neighbor. Enjoy the atmosphere of the market, and if brave enough, go there and buy something yourself! Remember to haggle over everything - otherwise people will cheat you.

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    MY SON - AREA OF C1

    by balhannah Written Oct 11, 2009

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    Deities on C1

    In this area you will find good 8th century celestial figures. These look to have Javan influence,
    The low, wide belts worn by the figures are thought to be of Indian origin, and it is believed the style came to Cham from Indonesia.

    OPEN 6.30 - 4.30pm daily

    you can take a mini-bus from Hoi An.
    There is an admission charge to pay if not on an organized tour

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    How to spend time in Hoi An

    by magor65 Written Nov 29, 2008

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    the streets of Hoi An
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    Hoi An is often described as a 'living museum' and it is not a mere reconstruction for tourists but an authentic working town. So if you are tired of visiting its numerous tourist attractions it can be a good idea to walk leisurely around and enjoy people watching.
    Hoi An is also renowned for its tailors. Many tourists leave the place with their suitcases filled with made-to-measure clothes for just a fraction of a western price (buying a dress for 10 dollars or a suit for 25 won't definitely ruin your budget). You can make your order on one day and your garment will be ready for the next day.
    When you feel hungry, go to one of many restaurants facing the river and sample their delicious food. Being rather conservative with new dishes, I usually opted for fried rice or spring rolls, and I loved them.
    What is important, Hoi An is a small town. You don't need any transport to explore it, just a pair of your own legs. The old Town is closed to cars, which is a relief after visiting other Vietnamese citiies.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    QUAN CONG TEMPLE

    by balhannah Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    QUAN CONG TEMPLE

    Quan Cong Temple was recognised as a "National Historic and Cultural Site" on 29 November 1991.

    The temple was built in 1653 and dedicated to Quan Cong, a prominent mandarin of the Han Dynasty. It's been restored many times in (1753, 1783, 1827,1864, 1904 and 1966), and still today, the temple's original structure has been kept almost the same.

    There is a 3mtr statue of Quan Cong, who is dressed in a green royal robe, and is rather red in the face, he has a long beard and his two hands clasped together as he rides a kneeling white horse

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    Concert of traditional music

    by magor65 Updated Nov 29, 2008

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    traditional dances
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    The entrance ticket to Hoi An attractions entitles you to attend one concert of traditional music or to visit an artisan workshop. We found out that concerts were given twice a day in an artisan shop in Nguyen Thai Hoc. So it's possible to combine two events at the same time.
    We came to the shop about twenty minutes before the scheduled start of the concert, which turned out to be a good decision, as the room was filling up with tourists very quickly.
    We enjoyed the show, especially the dances performed by a couple of charming young girls. The whole programme didn't last longer than half an hour, after which we visited the shop. I was especially impressed by colourful pictures embroidered by skillful artisans. We also watched wood carvers and lantern makers at work.

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    Wet Market (Central Market)

    by muddybok Updated Nov 30, 2006

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    Market Place

    This market is so close to when i stay, it was my first visited spot in Hoi An. In fact this is one most happening place for Hoi An in the morning. You can observe all the local activities, taking pictures of them. Its always good to smile and point to your camera as a gesture to seek approval to take their photos. You're likely to get a smile or nod to indicate you're allowed to take their photos.

    Nothing strange if some young girls approach you & telling you their mothers own the best tailor shop and asking you to follow them so that they can pass you a business card.

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    My Son Sanctuary...

    by Greggor58 Written Mar 4, 2010

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    My Son Sanctuary,Vietnam.
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    My Son is a UNESCO Heritage site that is essentially the remains of a religious settlement about an hours drive from Hoi An.

    The remains are a collection of structural remnants and artifacts of the people of the Champa Kingdom. Most of the structures were built in the 10th century and occupy a space of about ten hectares. It’s not a condensed site and requires walking a fair amount to access some of the venues so take warning if you might have mobility issues. Your access might be limited.

    The first mention of the “Kingdon of Champa” dates to about 192 AD in Chinese scriptures where it appears under the name Lin-Yi. It was a culture that was influenced and developed with beliefs and some practices of Indian Hinduism. The culture flourished well into the 13th century and likely faded as a results of conflict with various and more powerful civilizations.

    Throughout central Vietnam there are a few archeological sites that can be found that are from the Champa era although My Son is the most complete and the most studied, likely as a result of the status UNESCO gave to it in the late 1990’s.

    During the “American War” parts of the site were bombed by the USA and consequently some areas of the complex were obliterated. During the conflict and previous to the bombing communist forces were taking refuge in the area and hence the bombing. There are still areas where access is prohibited because the area has not been cleared of unexploded ordinance. You’ll see the odd rusted sign with a skull and crossbones attached to fencing here and there…DO NOT CROSS the line…

    I booked the tour through my hotel and paid only $ 8.00 for the entire tour. This included bus transport to the site accompanied by a guide for the duration of the tour and return by boat. Lunch was included for this price but soft drinks were not. We had the option of returning by bus or by boat. To return by bus the cost was only $ 6.00.
    The boat made a stop along the way back to Hoi An at Kim Bong carpentry village where we were able to walk around and visit wood carving shops where if you liked…you could purchase any of the available carvings.

    The tour was about a six hour adventure. And we spent about two hours actually on site. We arrived fairly early in the morning and as the morning wore on the crowds began to grow. I think the tour groups from farther away than Hoi An arrived later in the morning. It got crowded fast so I would recommend an earlier tour than the one that departs at 9:00 AM…there is an option to start at 5:30 AM and this would get you there much earlier and make for better photos I think.

    DO visit My Son if you are in the area…its certainly an interesting and memorable way to spend some time.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE "FRESH" MARKETS AT HOI AN

    by balhannah Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    Dawn at Hoi An Markets
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    Hoi An, and if you really want to see the locals going about there business at the wet markets, then you must be up early, just past dawn.

    At this time, the Market is a buzzing hive, so busy, its when you see all the fresh fish, vegetables, meat etc for sale, the sellers arriving with boats full of their goods, ready for sale at the markets.

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    HAINAN ASSEMBLY HALL

    by balhannah Written Oct 10, 2009

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    Inside Hainan Assembly Hall

    Built in 1851, the Assembly Hall of the Hainan Chinese Congregation is a memorial to 107 merchants from Hainan Island who were mistaken for pirates and killed in Quang Nam province during the reign of Emperor Tu Duc. The elaborate dais contains plaques to their memorY, and infront of the central altar is a fine gilded woodcarving of Chinese court life. These Chinese served the community and organised Hainan religious activities.

    ADMISSION..........
    Entry to all historical sites in Hoi An is via a coupon system, where VND75,000 gets you a ticket that can be used to enter five attractions: one museum, one assembly hall, the handicraft workshop or the traditional theatre, and either the Japanese Bridge or the Guangong Temple. Tickets are sold at various entry points into the old town.

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