Hoi An Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Hoi An

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    Beach in Hoi An

    by shavy Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    Rent one of the sun lounger
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    We rent a bike for a day, and discover Hoi-An especially outside where the local people lives. It's the best thing to do while you are in this town "renting bike" outside the town of Hoi-An you'll see where the fishing area.

    You also seen how the people do with their daily life, this a very small town, as we already travel from bigger towns and cities around Vietnam and comparing to this town
    I would say, here, you will find peace of living. People here are different that any other places in Vietnam more friendlier and respectful

    A four km from the town a remaining stretches of beach that remains, also the best sea foods area in Hoi An, if tanning and beach lounging are your thing, for the price of a bottle of water you can hire a sun lounger for the day
    Like all good beach bars and restaurants should, they stay open as long as there are customer

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    • Cycling
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    Lanterns

    by shavy Written Oct 13, 2013

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    Beautiful in colors
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    After an evening stroll through the old town its fairly likely that you’ll see everywhere with the iconic lights the Hoi An silk lanterns
    And it's available in shapes and sizes, fabrics and colours, and then of course there are dozens of artisans lining up to hand paint also in different price, haggling is also available here

    How bigger your Lantern how more you pay the price, It's very tempted to have this as a souvenir at home
    I was checking the material of the Lantern is very sensible as it's made from a fabrics, so I didn't bought
    I bought another souvenir instead

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    Thu Bon River in Hoi An

    by shavy Written Oct 13, 2013

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    River cruise at Thu Bon  river
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    Getting out of the touristy old quarter and into Hoi An's picturesque countryside is a must one of the best ways to do this is by hiring a boat to take you on a cruise of the Thu Bon river
    You could do this the posh way by jumping aboard one of many tourist boats, but we recommend hopping in one of the small sampans rowed by elderly locals don't expect them to speak fluent English by any stretch, but these hearty souls know how to make a foreigner smile, and they are incredibly adopt rowers who will cover a lot of water in an hour

    A one hour cruise should cost around 100,000 VND, though expect to pay more if wanting an evening row
    Avoid the midday sun, to pick up your boat, simply loiter on the Bach Dang riverside street, make eye contact with the first boatperson you like, and negotiate with a smile

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    The Hoi An Japanese Bridge

    by shavy Written Oct 13, 2013

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    In the middle of the bridge
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    This bridge is 18 meters long, 3 meters wide, and has 7 compartments sheltering an altar in the middle, the bridge is also used as a place of worship the pagoda is said to protect the bridge and the inhabitants against monsters and to grant peace for the town

    The bridge boasts a distinctive architecture, typical of tropical Asian countries built on stone foundations, it is a covered bridge, with a roof of double tiles the Japanese architecture is clearly visible on the outside of the bridge, notably the curved rood with its turned-up corners inside, the style is more Sine-Vietnamese
    The bridge is arched and paved with blocks of wood on both sides, small plinths were ounce used to display goods for sales the patterns and decoration lacquered and sculpted
    The pagoda situated in the middle of the bridge at each end of the bridge is a pair of statues, one of them dogs and the other monkeys these statues are carved in Jack fruit wood

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    Danang

    by shavy Updated Oct 13, 2013

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    The dragon bridge
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    We flown from Ho Chi Minh to Danang, but we escape Danang and goes straight to Hoi An it only 30 minute with a taxi we know there's no much around here exceptional for chic resorts is in the area

    There's more to Da Nang than just the beach, though, Da Nang boasts the excellent Cham Museum, which is a great primer for a visit to My Son further to the south the city also has a large Cao Dai temple, a pleasant riverfront boulevard, and wide leafy boulevards

    There are some good options for eating, drinking, and getting down in the evenings, which are likely to expand as the city does the immediate area includes attractions like Marble Mountain, Monkey Mountain and the Ba Na Hill Station

    Besides, most tourists just passing through here

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    The marble Mountain

    by shavy Updated Oct 13, 2013

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    This was taken at the top
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    The Marble consist of five isolated lie the mountains these rising up rock masses is made ​​accessible one, upon arrival at the foot of the mountain we have to climb up the stair in a very hot day

    The tour starts from a moment we steep it is necessary to take a break
    At the end of the stairs we come to a real gateway behind it are some caves that once designed as temples and now have their attraction for tourists

    One of the caves was very nice to see beautiful painted images. Buddhist statues are worth and well enough at least for some pictures after a moment looked out from the top floor and having enjoyed the beautiful view

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    Half day tour to My Son

    by shavy Updated Oct 13, 2013

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    The Heritage
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    One of the most popular half-day trips from Hoi An is a visit to the Cham ruins of My Son, approximately 35 kilometres from the old town

    Now, the hype surrounding the UNESCO-protected Champa temple complex built in the years between the fourth to 14th century, generally makes for a rather disappointing trip if you do it the standard way

    This means a crack of dawn departure in a cramped minibus hurtling down the busy highway after so much time spent doing hotel pick ups that you completely miss the sunrise and generally hit the coach park at the same time as 20 other busloads of tourists

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    Japanese bridge

    by Twan Updated May 14, 2012
    Japanese bridge
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    Chua Cau (translated as Japanese Bridge) is a covered pedestrian bridge in the Vietnamese city of Hoi An which is part of the historical center, a World Heritage Site. This bridge is painted pink and made of wood. Especially in winter, this bridge is under water. He is part of the Tran Phu street and runs over the Thu Bon River.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Heaven and Earth Bicycle Tours

    by TheAndos Written Mar 22, 2012

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    This tour was recommended to us by fellow travellers when we were in Ha Long Bay. I booked the two hour "Herb Village" but there is a variety of tours available - half day, overnight homestay. The company is run by Pascal, ex pat French, and his Vietnamese wife, Thu. I set off down to their office on one of our hotel bikes, crossed the bridge to the southern part of Ho An, and followed the map on their card.

    I swapped bikes for a more robust and newer model and we set off - five of us, with guide Chum (spelling?!) and an assistant guide at the back. Both spoke good English and were enthusiastic and informative. We headed north out of town, and headed into the fields on a path. Chum told us about the rice and peanut crops and was open to questions. Then we headed on a path through a village to a house where the family rice at 3am to make rice noodles. The process is complicated as the rice is soaked, pounded to a dough, steamed in layered oven over a big fire. Then the noodles are put in a mixer before they are rolled out, and sliced on a hand machine. THEN they are steamed again before being delivered to restaurants. Some are dried under fishing nets (to protect from birds).

    It was very peaceful to be away from the honing of horns, past roosters and chicks, water buffalo. Next stop was at a market garden where we smelled fresh herbs and tried at hands at watering the garden, Vietnamese style.

    Sometimes we crossed a road, or rode along one but mainly you are in the country. The pace is easy and the road flat. Fortunately there was a little cloud so it wasn't too hot.

    Highly recommended. $5

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    Heaven and Earth Bicycle Tours

    by Robert1212 Written Dec 4, 2010

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    I recently went on a bike tour with heaven and earth tours. It was not a touristy set up and was a wonderful way to see the authentic countryside.

    I did the morning tour and was travelling with a nice group of six. we started with a short ride through the streets of Hoi An (a cyclist's paradise) before taking a short ferry ride to nearby traffic free islands.

    We visited a boat builder, mother of pearl woodcraft 'studio, an ice factory and then those who wanted to try the basket boat.

    Great for families or anyone who would like to see more of the rural life outside Hoi An.

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    Walking Around

    by NedHopkins Written Feb 28, 2006

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    A typical Sino-Viet house
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    Hoi An is -- as are Ouro Preto, Firenze, Takayama, and other UNESCO World Heritage Sites -- a wonderful place just to walk around, admire the architecture and the ambience, and pop into buildings that interest you.

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    • Seniors
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    Phuoc Kien Temple

    by NedHopkins Written Feb 26, 2006

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    Main courtyard, looking back toward the modern gat
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    Also known as the Fujian Chinese Congregation Assembly Hall, this temple complex was begun in the 18th century to commemorate six families that fled China during the chaos accompanying the Manchu (Ching Dynasty) overthrow of the Ming. Its original purpose was a meeting place for the Fujian Chinese; additions were made and the complex was converted into a temple.

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    Tan Ky House

    by NedHopkins Updated Feb 26, 2006

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    Tan Ky House, exterior
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    The Tan Ky house was built four centuries ago, according to a local I met, by a Japanese merchant who was stranded when the Tokugawa shogun closed Japan, forbidding Japanese to leave their country and Japanese abroad to return.

    It's an interesting story and accounts for the unusual construction: a Japanse-style ground floor, a Chinese-like first story. Interesting but not true. The house was built in the 1800s.

    While the curators prefer you enter from Nguyen Thai Hoc St, you may also come in from the Bach Dang St door -- so long as you have a pip left on your visitors' card.

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    Japanese Bridge

    by NedHopkins Written Feb 24, 2006

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    A must-see in Hoi An is the Japanese Bridge. Constructed in the 1590s its exterior has remained unchanged while its interior has undergone many modifications. The French, for example, flatened its pathway to accommodate automobiles; following independence and unification in 1975, the roadway was returned to its original shape.

    While it would not be extraordinary if found in Kyoto or Nara, the bridge is striking in Hoi An because it is so much more subtle in design and color than the town's many exhuberantly colorful Chinese and Chinese-influenced structures.

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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Chaozhou Chinese Assembly Hall

    by NedHopkins Written Feb 27, 2006

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    Another of the beautiful Chinese congregation halls, this one was begun in 1776, a year in which Vietnamese independence was ending just as American independence was beginning.

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    • Seniors
    • Arts and Culture

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