Tra Kieu Tay (1) Travel Guide

  • More elephants frolic above a door at My Son
    More elephants frolic above a door at My...
    by mtncorg
  • Empty cyclos wait for customers at Japanese bridge
    Empty cyclos wait for customers at...
    by mtncorg
  • Gateway to Phuoc Khien Assembly Hall
    Gateway to Phuoc Khien Assembly Hall
    by mtncorg

Tra Kieu Tay (1) Things to Do

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    by mtncorg Written May 11, 2010

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    From the parking lot it is about a walk of one kilometer up into the ruins. Before entering into the ruins, you have a hut that serves refreshments and sells souvenirs. Opposite is a small open-air theater where several times a day locals perform Cham music and dance to get the tourists in the right frame of mind. The performances last about 20-30 minutes.

    Cham music and dance performed at My Son
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Music

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    by mtncorg Written May 11, 2010

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    Group G from the 11th century is damaged by time and remains both off the beaten path and overgrown. Group E was from the 8th - 11th centuries. Group F - 8th century - while badly damaged - bomb craters next to the kalan - has a nicely carved lingam in the altar. Kings are buried round about.

    Preservation attempts at Group F Remains of carvings from the past at Group F Bomb crater next to Group F from B 52 strike Cham kings were laid to rest next to the kalan Ancient Cham temple stands mutely in jungle
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    by mtncorg Written May 11, 2010

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    This group was devastated from the bombing which left piles of brick all around. The tower of A1 was the largest building at my son and it was the only kalan with two doors - east facing the Hindu gods and west facing Groups B, C and D where the spirits of the ancient kings were buried. Atop A1, a stone altar has been pieced back together. Here and there sculptures remains. One that caught my eye was an elephant looking out towards the ancient kings to the west with the Hon Quap (Cat’s Tooth Mountain) rises in the distance. The mountain used to play a role here at My Son, but the question of mines remains a serious problem for today’s would-be hiker.

    Hon Quap rises above yoni of Tower A 1 The reconstructed altar of A 1 Sculptured bases lying in the grasses of Group A Joss sticks from more recent pilgrims to My Son Elephant looks out from west entrance to A 1 kalan
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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

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Tra Kieu Tay (1) Local Customs

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    by mtncorg Written May 11, 2010

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    We came upon a group of Vietnamese visitors from the north who had gathered together in prayer about some of the different aspects of the ruins here. They shared their respect with those who had come before making My Son what it is today.

    Gathering for prayers to those who came before Incense offered to the ancient Cham Prayers of another sort
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    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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Tra Kieu Tay (1) Off The Beaten Path

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    by mtncorg Written May 11, 2010

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    One UNESCO site deserves another. Only some 25 km from My Son is the former port city of Hoi An. For many tourists, Hoi An is Vietnam. Built as a port for the Champa kingdom, the town’s best days came after the Cham left - 17th through 19th centuries - with Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Portuguese, Dutch and others all milling about in the name of trade. Eventually, the Thu Bon River silted up the harbor enough for the ships to seek out the newer harbor of Da Nang to the north. The town’s old quarter dates back to the early part of the 19th century - some much earlier. The Japanese Covered Bridge - originally built in 1593 - serves as a symbol for Hoi An today. Several old homes are open to visitors as are several restored Chinese Assembly Halls. There are many hotels and restaurants in the town and many more just a short hop to the north in Da Nang and along China Beach. Hoi An is a magnet for tourists coming to Vietnam. As such, it can get a bit much between the tourists - I saw a whole busload being carted down the street in a convoy of cyclos - and the T-shirt vendors. Capitalism is alive and well here in the People’s Republic.

    Empty cyclos wait for customers at Japanese bridge Japanese Covered Bridge - symbol for Hoi An today Along the Thu Bon River at Hoi An Cyclos mass outside the Museum of Trade Ceramics Gateway to Phuoc Khien Assembly Hall
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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