Batchelor Things to Do

  • THE ENTRANCE TO LITCHFIELD NATIONAL PARK
    THE ENTRANCE TO LITCHFIELD NATIONAL PARK
    by DennyP
  • BEWARE OF THE CROCODILES WHEN SWIMMING
    BEWARE OF THE CROCODILES WHEN SWIMMING
    by DennyP
  • Things to Do
    by sirgaw

Most Recent Things to Do in Batchelor

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    Litchfield National Park – Part 1

    by sirgaw Updated Aug 15, 2012

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    Tip posted on both Darwin and Batchelor ‘things to do’

    Our reason for staying in Batchelor was the nearby Litchfield National Park. Our brief look at the Top End included Kakadu, Katherine for the gorge and return to Darwin. It was easier staying one night in Batchelor rather than back tracking when staying in Darwin.

    The entrance to the park is about 120 km from Darwin and 18 km from Batchelor.and along very well maintained roads.

    The first of many attractions is the magnetic termite mounds that look like a vast collection of unloved and overgrown tomb stones as seen in wild west movies – except these are living monuments and built by white ants (termites) that have a fearsome reputation for destroying almost any timber structures – hungry little &^%$#@’s

    The Litchfield fact sheet states, ‘the magnetic termite mounds are in a north-south orientation, which acts as a built-in temperature control mechanism allowing only the least possible surface area to be exposed to the heat of the sun.’ Common sense would indicate that is wrong as N-S orientation gives the greatest sun exposure to in turn the E and W sides of the mound; however I am not an entomologist and just using logic.

    The Cathedral Termite Mounds (photo’s 1, 2 and 5) are far more spectacular and can be as high as 5 metres (photo 2 I’m standing in front of the same mound as per photo 1 and I am about 1.8 metres tall as a comparison)

    We did see the Cathedral Termite mounds in many parts of NT and from The Ghan train as it headed south, however Litchfield was the only place we saw the Magnetic mounds – unless we inadvertently mistook what looked ‘like a vast collection of unloved and overgrown tomb stones as seen in wild west movies.’

    Nature at its best, unless you happen to own a timber home - LOL

    Considerably more information on the NT Govt web site as below

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Litchfield National Park – Part 2

    by sirgaw Written Aug 12, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Tip posted on both Darwin and Batchelor ‘things to do’

    The only other part of Litchfield that we explored was the Buley Rockholes and Florence Falls area and combined that with a walk through aptly named Shady Creek walk.

    The rock holes were a spectacular collection of bathing areas completely safe from crocs, however not from the human morons who insisted on climbing a tree and in spite of the warning signs leaping into the pool. I was hoping that a pet croc or two might be interested in a quick snack, but then again the morons may not have been to the liking of crocs.

    The Florence Falls are even more spectacular than the rock holes with a number of cascades tumbling over sheer drops to the deep and inviting pool below – and yes many were taking advantage of a cooling swim free from the normal danger of hungry crocs.

    There are 137 steps that lead from the car park down to the well maintained path to the pool – and then there is a real clamber to find spots to wade in amongst the stones and boulders. I attempted a fully clothed balancing act to get a clear photo shot of the pool and I am far from being a circus performer, so what is shown is as best as I was able to manage (there were peels of laughter from the ‘younger ones’ as I showed off my complete lack of skills when it comes to slippery rock hopping).

    Lady Gaw is well known for being a wimp when it comes to death defying climbs up perfectly safe but see through type metal stairs. She managed to convince me that the Shady Creek walk was a better way of returning to the car park. I’m glad she did as it was a great little walk of about 1 km through a shady walkway that crossed many times a brook that led to the river. Sadly nature called her while we were surrounded by nature (why can’t girls just ‘go’ behind a tree?) and so we had to return quicker than I’d hoped.

    Sadly, and after our all too brief experience with Litchfield, it was time to hit the road for the 1.5 hour trip to Darwin and civilization and we missed out on many of the features in the park. Another regret was the rental car company took a dim view to their rental vehicles being used on dirt roads, so we had to partly retrace our journey through Batchelor rather than via the Cox Peninsula Road and 30 km unsealed road.

    Considerably more information on the NT Govt web site as below

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Budget Travel

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    Batchelor public loo's

    by sirgaw Written Aug 3, 2012

    As I said in the introduction to Batchelor, it is not a very big town. However it does have a unique attraction for those 'busting' to spend their time.

    Seems in many small towns the locals look for something, ANYTHING to fill in their day. Seeing that this town does not have traffic lights where the locals can linger and watch the passing parade of vehicles all controlled by red, amber and green lights, they got busy with paint and brushes to give the town another attraction.

    I can say it was well equipped inside. Flushed with success I decided to share this attraction with you all. There was a downside - it is segregated!!!!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel
    • Backpacking

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    VISIT LITCHFIELD NATIONAL PARK

    by DennyP Updated Apr 28, 2012

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    THE ENTRANCE TO LITCHFIELD NATIONAL PARK
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    My stop off in Bachelor was only brief and that was for fuel , essential water and some information on the National Park itself..being the middle of winter I was really appreciating the thirty degree C temperatures that made for a great day and perfect weather to be out and about , but after many hours walking at different sites in the National Park even the winter heat can take its toll on the unwary. There are many great sites waterfalls and swimming holes like "Buley Rockhole" to be enjoyed. You will surely be amazed at the size of the many "magnetic" Termite Mounds that dot the landscape with many standing over two meters tall and so named as the way they are placed in a magnetic north / south orientation. to maintain a certain temperature within the mound. Make sure that you visit "The Lost City"
    Take notice of the WARNING signs for crocodiles and ONLY swim where its safe to do so
    I and four friends hired a small car in Darwin and set out for the day ...This was a very cheap way to see the National Park as your own transport is a neccesity..The round trip for the day was about three hundred kilometers and after fuel and hire car rates with all costs split five ways ...it was only AUST$20.00 each..so ..what an inexpensive day out!!! to see one of the great National Parks here in the Northern Territory..

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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Batchelor Things to Do

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