Darwin Warnings and Dangers

  • A COUPLE OF ROADTRAINS AT A TRUCKSTOP
    A COUPLE OF ROADTRAINS AT A TRUCKSTOP
    by DennyP
  • VERY VULNERABLE KANGAROOS LIE ON THE WARM HIGHWAYS
    VERY VULNERABLE KANGAROOS LIE ON THE...
    by DennyP
  • Blue-Green Algae Warning
    Blue-Green Algae Warning
    by AlbuqRay

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Darwin

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    Crocodiles, Box Jelly Fish & Blue-Green Algae

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jul 1, 2012

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    Temp Warning About Blue-Green Algae on Signpost
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    As almost always near any saltwater in Northern Territory, there are warning signs about crocodiles. This was true along both the Rapid Creek and Nightcliff Foreshores, and Rapid Creek itself. Box jelly fish are also a danger if you get in the water. When I was there (August 2010), there were also signs warning about the blue-green algae. Needless to say, I didn't see many people in the water.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    WHEN SWIMMING ...BE CAREFUL

    by DennyP Updated Mar 23, 2012

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    A SALTWATER CROCODILE.
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    Darwin
    Like most Australian capitals Darwin has some good beaches...but here one must be wary of crocodiles that frequent the area...To swim locally one must be just be vigilant at all times..Saltwater Crocs have been known to venture miles out to sea.The whole of the northern Australian coastline is infested with crocodiles.ALWAYS take notice of the warning signs.

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    • Road Trip

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    ALWAYS CARRY PLENTY OF WATER OUT HERE

    by DennyP Updated Mar 23, 2012

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    always carry sufficient fresh bottled water

    NORTHERN TERRITORY
    When out and about here in the Northern part of Australia..ALWAYS make sure that you are carrying sufficient amount of fresh bottled water for your daily needs. Make sure that you have at least a litre for every hour that you are out hiking or just walking. Replacement of lost fluids due to the excessive heat is a must.There are very few places to replenish your water supply in the National Parks so make sure that you have enough...to be without water here is extremely dangerous.I always carry a wet face cloth in a small zip lock plastic sandwich bag..

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    • Camping
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    • National/State Park

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    BEWARE OF ROADTRAINS WHEN DRIVING OUT HERE!

    by DennyP Written Jan 3, 2012

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    A SEVENTY WHEELER WITH FOUR HUGE TANKERS
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    DARWIN
    To drive out in the Territory is fantastic.Once you are out of the city Limits it doesn't take long to be out in the bush..The main roads are fine and the traffic can be dangerous like anywhere.. Just watch out for the huge roadtrains that fly along these outback Highways. People talk of the usual 18 wheelers they have back home...but these roadtrains have sometimes 70 or more wheels under four or five huge long trailers. Always be careful of the last trailer as they tend to "snake" being on the end. Give yourself plenty of time and room to overtake these huge trucks and trailers. Sometimes patience is the answer..
    Another obstacle on the highways can be wildlife..These can cause you big problems.

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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    WHEN DRIVING WATCH OUT FOR THE WILDLIFE

    by DennyP Updated Oct 22, 2011

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    A BABY WALLABY WHOS MOTHER WAS KILLED BY A CAR
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    TAKE CARE
    Many visitors when driving in Australia's "outback" DO NOT take the wildlife into consideration . These animals can be very numerous and to hit any at speed can be disiasterous even fatal. The driving distances here are vast with Towns and Road Houses long distances apart.and although the areas are so sparsely populated speeding vehicles having accidents with wildlife and feral animals is inevitabel.
    Local people usually do not drive, if at all, at high speeds at night . I always try and be off isolated country Highways at sunset and organising my camp or accomodation. as sunset is when wildlife comes out to eat and "fossick for food". There are other animals ALSO to be aware of when driving here as there are numerous large "feral" animals roaming the outback ie: camels, horses, buffalo, lost cattle, wild pigs ,donkeys, wild dogs and of course then there is all the natural wildlife..Please remember this can happen in extremely isolated areas where there is NO help and NO communication....so Please take care when driving "Aussies outback"
    PLEASE TAKE NOTICE OF ADVISORY WILDLIFE ROAD SIGNS..THEY ARE THERE FOR A GOOD REASON

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    • National/State Park
    • Camping

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  • wise23girl's Profile Photo

    Kakadu...Nourlangie

    by wise23girl Updated Sep 23, 2011

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    Mind yourself on the climb.

    Mind yourself on this 1.5 circular walk. After a relatively easy day (except for distance to arrive at Kakadu) and carting hats and water around that we really did not need up till then, suddenly we were on a hot dusty guided walk in the hottest part of the day. No water , small hat...me...I was caught out!

    There was no special reminder to bring water nor did I see any signs. Sure we did get to shady spots to view the outstanding aboriginal art on the cave walls but I was certainly ready for the shade by then.

    We saw indentations in the rocks where food was once prepared and later climbed the rocky surface of a cliff for a great view of the surrounding area. Not a climb for everyone .

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  • robertgaz's Profile Photo

    Illegal fishing vessels

    by robertgaz Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Seen better days

    The Federal Government has an ongoing battle with illegal fishermen entering Australian water poaching fish and in particular shark fins and trochus shells.

    Many fishing vessels end up being torched to destroy pests and diseases or just left to rust in Darwin Harbour.

    The Australian Navy has just spent squillions on new patrol boats that are faster with capacity to stay at sea longer.

    Poachers beware!

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Food Imports

    by MikeAtSea Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Prohibited Items

    Australia has got a very strict policy of what one can take into the country and what not.
    Most of the food items are prohibited upon arrival and even if you have an apple in your hand luggage you may get fined.
    If in doubt check the web page link below and see what you can bring with you.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    CARRY AND USE RELIABLE MOSQUITO REPELLANT

    by DennyP Written Mar 11, 2010

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    A GOOD INSECT AND MOSQUITO REPELLANT IS A MUST

    When travelling in the Northern part of Australia locally referred to as the "Top End" ,it is strongly advisable to carry and use a reliable insect and mosquito repellant..Especially in the evenings by the water or the local rivers.Don't worry about the aroma as everybody else (if they are smart ) is wearing it as well....Dengue fever has been reported in some parts of northern Australia..

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    • Camping

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    "The Build Up"

    by balhannah Updated Sep 9, 2009

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    "The Build Up" as they call it in the Northern Territory, is before the storm season starts. October to March, is when the wet, storm season is, and its very hot and humid.

    If you are not used to this kind of heat, you will not like it. We were there at the start of it, and I was in the pool at 7am, and at night we had air conditioning and fans going all night.
    If you can, try and visit at a slightly cooler time, unless you want to see some spectacular storm action, and rain like its being poured from a bucket.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Crocodiles & Water - Includes Waterholes

    by Mikebb Updated Sep 5, 2009

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    Notice - Crocodile Warning

    Saltwater crocodiles are most likely the most serious animal danger facing tourists in the Northern Territory.

    Saltwater crocodiles are not restricted to salt water, that is the ocean and bays surrounding the landmass. They are often found in rivers and inland freshwater pools and do inhabit inland National Parks such as Litchfield.

    During the "Wet Season" when rivers and creeks swell the saltwater crocodiles move along the inland waterways. Always beware of crocodiles, read the signs alongside waterways and obey the instructions as your untrained eye most likely will not see the crocodiles submerged in the muddy waters.

    During the "Dry Season" the Park Rangers remove Satwater Crocodiles from certain swimming holes in National Parks but not all waterholes. Read the signs before entering any waters. If no sign, Do Not Enter Water.

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    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Family Travel

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    Australia's Crocs

    by Tripack Written Jun 16, 2008

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    Say cheese!
    1 more image


    Please sensitive soul do not look my (last) picture...

    Yes I was so scare by my Croc experience... but hopefully for me my Corc buddy prefer some Swiss chocos instead of my Swiss flesh... so I survided. But it was almost my last picture...

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    • Zoo

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  • OH_DK's Profile Photo

    Take care of mine shafts

    by OH_DK Updated Jun 11, 2008

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    Do never step back when you're near a mine shaft in Australia.
    I did so - I was told by Ann:
    Ok, here's the story... you and Patrick were posing for a photo shoot and you
    accidently stepped back and fell down a mine shaft....and till this day, you are
    still at Miners Park, Pine Creek....somewhere :o)
    But all is not lost....

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    • National/State Park

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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Don’t upset the Rangers!

    by tiabunna Updated Jun 10, 2008

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    Reg 87, part B, sub-clause 5, second  line, says..

    This ‘warning’ is so unlikely that it almost belongs in 'local customs'! Our host for the VT meeting was Zig (1+1) who has lived for many years in the Darwin area and who is himself a Park Ranger in the Kakadu National Park controlled by the Australian Government. So it’s fair to say that he looked more than slightly bemused when, as we arrived in our mini-bus for our catered picnic lunch at Berry Springs Nature Reserve, he found himself confronted by two Northern Territory Park Rangers!

    They explained to us that some obscure law required a permit for catered lunches in their Nature Reserve! So Zig explained patiently that nobody had ever heard of this rule, there were no signs to indicate it existed, we weren’t proposing to sell food to the public, we were entirely a private group etc. Zig even pointed out that there were many other private groups having lunch there, the only difference was that they were preparing their own meals. Finally they relented and we were allowed to have our lunch on the proviso “as long as it doesn’t happen again”.

    Isn’t a little power a marvellous thing! It would be churlish, I’m sure, were I to comment that some effort to clean and freshen the toilet/change rooms, which were the least savoury we saw on our entire trip, would be more useful to the community than this puffing about some obscure regulation! So I shan’t say that.

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    • Eco-Tourism

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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    A few basic precautions

    by tiabunna Written Jun 9, 2008

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    This will slow down the mossies!

    The Port Victoria settlement failure, at least in part, followed the classical old “white man’s grave” story: malaria, tropical diseases, and simply collective despair and failure resulting from a lack of ability to cope with living in the tropics. It’s a very long time since Australia had any malaria problems, but other problems could easily arise if you aren’t careful.

    Away from Darwin, you can expect to be assailed by swarms of voracious mosquitos if you are anywhere near the wetlands as the sun goes down. They don’t carry malaria, but they can carry other diseases and create significant allergy reactions, quite apart from being a nuisance. In these areas, be sure to have the most powerful mossie repellent you can find!

    The mossies aren’t such a problem during the day, but in daytime two diffferent issues become relevant – neither a problem if you take simple precautions.

    ● In the short term, dehydration can develop very quickly because of the high temperatures: be sure to drink copious amounts of water – at least 8 glasses daily is recommended. Don’t wait until you feel thirsty, just drink lots regardless! And no, alcohol and coffee don’t necessarily count because they tend to be diuretics – so drink an equivalent amount of water in addition to them, ie a glass of water alongside your coffee.

    ● Use a good quality sunscreen (SP30+ rating) or cover up to minimise the risk of sunburn (which comes easily) and, as a longer term possibility, the risk of skin cancer. Northern Australia’s white communities have the world’s highest rates of skin cancer. It also helps to wear a hat with a brim!

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    • Eco-Tourism

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Darwin Warnings and Dangers

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