Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Favorites

  • Leaving Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park
    Leaving Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park
    by AlbuqRay
  • Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Toll Booth
    Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Toll...
    by AlbuqRay
  • What is Open
    What is Open
    by AlbuqRay

Most Recent Favorites in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Kata Tjuta 2

    by iandsmith Written Oct 1, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Kata Tjuta means many heads and the peak that sits beside you as you start out on the trail has no apparent name and is 40 metres lower than Mount Olga. The walk is a rubber necker’s delight; you have to keep gazing aloft in awe as the scenery sweeps you up in its grasp and then you crest the first small rise and tempting glimpses of others come into the scene beyond. The path then descends to Kara Lookout where the distant domes can be better viewed but, already from those on the trail, I’m hearing about the second lookout.
    Just after Kara the trail turns right, heading up a narrow canyon on a goat track where a sometime waterfall is traversed. Massive boulders carrying huge stones line up beside you, torn from the mountain aeons ago. The dark stain of the watercourses streak the cliffs and are in stark contrast to the orange rocks; the holes from whence these boulders came add decorations to an already mesmerizing vista.
    Then you’re turning left, moving steadily upwards, noting yet another peak looming on the right in this fertile canyon with its appropriate name. The air bursts through the channel afforded it by the domes and bows the plants as it whistles by.
    There’s now a sense of anticipation as you near Karingana, the second lookout, and the truly wonderful spectacle as you reach the top does not disappoint. Looking behind or in front will have you shaking your head trying to take at least some of it in. There’s such a contrast in colour as well, all dependent upon the time of day you’ve arrived. The distant domes are a brooding brown while behind me the ochres of granite, gneiss and basalt are dazzling in the early morning sun.

    Fondest memory: The steep drop now takes you to the grassy plain below utilizing the rough track until it levels out and becomes a lot easier. Here it’s a different world, less dramatic, perhaps more pretty but still windblown. It sweeps around to the left and continues up another incline until, looking to your rear, you have clear sweeping views of the band of lesser domes to the south some of the 36 all told. They appeared so bulbous from the other side this morning at the viewpoint yet from here they appear as benign bubbles floating on a sea of spinifex and desert oak.
    Ahead there’s a welcome drink station with cool H2O and shade and many stop here, glad for the drink and glad for a reason to pause. I, too, relax and reflect and think how this walk fulfilled my expectations and then some. I never thought I’d do a walk in Australia that would rival those done in Karijini, but this one certainly did.
    Most of the 2.6 kms back to the carpark goes over the initial path and my legs aren’t too happy after days of endless rocky paths and inclines, but there’s still Uluru to go.

    Panorama from the valley Heading back Erosion holes Looking back to the second lookout The domes of Kata Tjuta
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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    A reason to go

    by iandsmith Written Oct 1, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I have to admit here to a bias. I really wasn't visiting the area to see Uluru, though obviously it was on my agenda; no, Kata Tjuta was my goal. Everyone who knows me that has been there told me to do the "Valley of the Winds".
    The following is my story of that day, " THE AGONY AND THE ECSTACY
    The whole trip hadn’t been about one thing, but if it had been, Valley of the Winds would have been it. Of all the things I planned to see, this was the most cherished.
    I’d risen early, heck, I was even under way before the sun reached over the horizon after a night at Curtis Springs, some 100 kms distant from Uluru NP. I cruised along, anticipation building as I conjured up things I might see today; excitement was in the air. I rocked up to the park entrance and got a three day pass and soldiered on, pictures of Kata Tjuta flowing through my brain and I took the turn off and saw the sign, “Valley Of The Winds – CLOSED”. The red background of the sign matched the colour of my complexion as expletive deleteds in considerable numbers burst from my lips. I couldn’t believe it; I was totally shattered, devastated and felt like my whole holiday was in ruins.

    Fondest memory: At the first lookout on the road I stopped and tried to make sense of it. There’d been no other warning, no reason given forth; I could only assume that it was because the temperature seemed like it would be hot and that Occ. Health and Safety had taken over. I moved off again until I reached the Valley of the Winds carpark turn off and decided to go see what the problem was. Well, the problem was you couldn’t get a park!
    Here a tourist bus, there two motorhomes, elsewhere a dozen 4WDs. I stopped and asked a tour guide what was going on and referred to the sign. He said it was open as far as he knew and said they often closed it at 11 a.m. on hot days. I replied I understood that but it was only 8.30 and obviously a lot of other people had driven past the sign because they were coming in behind me.
    Suddenly my joy was manifest, my smile permanent, my enthusiasm bursting as I packed and set off behind a small group.
    Immediately this walk has impact. There’s something about these massive mounds of conglomerate that exude power and dominance. The embedded rocks are the size of a clenched fist and bigger, apparently remnants of a landscape that was inundated by the sea 600 million years ago before the whole thing was lifted and then eroded to form the inselbergs we see today. Mount Olga, at 1,066 metres, is around 110 metres taller from the surrounding plain than Uluru and, up close and personal, it feels it.

    Looking side on at Kata Tjuta The bulbous southern view First lookout on the Valley of the Winds Kata Tjuta panorama from the lookout Mount Olga on the right
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  • sheherezad's Profile Photo

    To package or DIY??

    by sheherezad Written May 8, 2012

    Favorite thing: One advantage of a 3D/2N package with tours (which I did) is that you get the relevant narration and explanations of the sights that you see. Otherwise, like a young woman in Sydney said of Ayer's Rock: "it's just a rock" and "there's nothing there", otherwise! ;-)

    With such narration/explanatory notes on every nook and crevice on the famed rock, I began to see the meaning and significance of everything to the local aborigines - it all made sense! So much so that I was enchanted by "the rock"! If you see my Uluru pages you might appreciate what I mean..

    Yes, appearance-wise, the Olgas may look more interesting. But aboriginal culture/story-telling wise, Uluru took so much more meaning, at least to me! :-)

    Fondest memory: See my Uluru pages? :-)

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  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Toll Booth

    by AlbuqRay Updated Apr 8, 2011

    Favorite thing: About 4 km south of Yulara on the Lasseter Highway, you come to the Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park toll booth. The Park 3-day use fee is 25 AUD per person. From the toll booth, it is 9 km to the sunset viewing area for cars, 13 km to the Cultural Center, 15 km to Uluru, and 48 km to Kata Tjuta (Olga Mountains). There is also a sign telling you whether the Uluru climb and the Kata Tjuta Valley of the Winds Walk are open. Please note that, although it is not forbidden except under bad conditions, the Aboriginal people ask that you not climb Uluru since it is a sacred site for them. There are also safety and environmental reasons.

    Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Toll Booth What is Open Road Into Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Last Chance to Go Back to Uluru Leaving Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park
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  • ernmalleyscrub's Profile Photo

    Flies in the Outback

    by ernmalleyscrub Updated Jun 11, 2009

    Favorite thing: Uluru is only a rock, but what a rock!Please be aware that Uluru is now often closed for climbing, due to the sensitivity of the local indigenous people and safety considerations. So don't expect to climb Uluru. It was always extremely dangerous anyway. Each year there were deaths from the climbing. This is a tragic fact of the steep and difficult climb and many tourists being not up to the effort and not admitting their lack of fitness. The walk around Uluru is easy and has plenty of points of interest. The round trip takes about two hours for fit people in a hurry, but can take three and a half / four hours if you like to dawdle.
    Please note ; The Olgas are under rated so go for a wander around them, always take water.
    If you wear glasses, even sunglasses, consider having a strap or strong thread connecting them around your neck. If you knock the glasses off when swatting at flies, you can lose or break them. Sunglasses are highly recommended in the Outback of Australia, all year round.
    Consider a mesh face protecter that can hang from your broad brimmed hat. It may look unfashionable, but is a great way of protecting yourself from flies and sunburn.

    Fondest memory: The vastness of the flat desert contrasts with the huge lump of Uluru, which is sitting at ninety degrees to the position that it was laid down hundreds of millions of years ago. What mighty force tipped this humongous rock on its side? How big was it when it was made ???
    Also the red dust of the area for hunrdeds or thousands of miles around Uluru is the same stuff that Uluru is made of.So the erosion of millions off years has not erased this mighty rock from existence. The walk around Uluru is very good. Get there early, especially if travelling during the hotter months.

    Uluru Northern Territory Australia Uluru from helicopter, highly recommended
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  • ShireLass85's Profile Photo

    Good Time for Flies?

    by ShireLass85 Written Jul 19, 2007

    Favorite thing: Go in the winter!

    I went to Uluru and hiked its diameter on June 17... which is midwinter in Australia, practically the shortest day of the year and cooler than usual.

    The black flies everyone complains about were practically non-existant. I didn't even notice any buzzing around until the last km of my 9 km hike around the rock when it was about midday. They were nonexistent at night at the sounds of silence dinner. I can't imagine doing the hike or the dinner with a net on and dozens of flies trying to go up my nose. Not a problem in the more winter months.

    It was still very hot, another reason I can't imagine going in the summer. It was a nice warmish day oon my hike, even needed a light jacket until the end where the midday sun made it HOT. The night was cold, so do wear sweaters and jackets. multiple. But if you are at the sounds of silence dinner, there are heat lamps outside Sit under one and you'll be fine in a couple of sweaters.

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    The motel at the gate

    by 850prc Updated Jun 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Right at the main entry area to the Uluru-Kata Tjuta lands is a lodge, the Yulara Outback Lodge. There are also a couple of "malls" with grocery stores, snack shops and clothing outlets. This area is the civilized part of the park.

    We were stuck around the Yulara Lodge one afternoon on our way BACK to Alice Springs. Due to the complications that often arise when travelling in the Outback, we had to wait about six hours for a bus service back to Alice. The folks at Yulara were friendly enough, but theres one very negative thing... You cannot buy a beer or any alcohol unless you are STAYING at the lodge. It's the rules laid down by the Anangu owners of the area. Gotta admit that it made very little sense to me, as a couple of beers would have made the hours go by more quickly.

    One thing that IS nice is that there are public showers...we found it quite refreshing to slip over for a quick shower to get some of the Uluru camping dust from our bodies. I"m not sure if we were "allowed" to use these showers, as we were not guests. But enforcement on the showers is much more lax than the serving of alcohol.

    Fondest memory: I can't imagine staying at the Yulara Lodge. If you came this far, you'd want to go out to Uluru itself and camp. And if you're into luxury camping, there is one place (Latitude something or other) that will feed your need for foo-foo camping and Zen to the tune of about $800 a night. But if you do want to visit the Outback Pioneer Lodge, to to www.voyages.com.au

    Yulara itself is just a motel, albeit a clean and friendly one.

    Then again, had we been stuck there for the night, I suppose I would have checked in and then RAN (not walked) back to the bar.

    Outback Pioneer Lodge at Yulara

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  • Free Park Passes

    by yankinwaoz Written Apr 21, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: To visit Uluru or The Olgas, you have to have a park pass. They cost $25AUD and are good for 3 days.

    I found that sometimes you can get a free "used" park pass from visitors that are leaving early. Some people only go for one day, so their park pass is still good for 2 more days.

    The passes have an expiration date on them. The holder is supposed to print their name of them, I suppose to prevent the pass from being given to others.

    Standing at the campground office waiting for a bus, I found that campers checking out would offer me their un-expired tickets.

    So if you are on a really tight budget, then perhaps you can ask people checking out if you can have their ticket. They are easy to spot because they park their vehicals on the outbound lane and run into to check out of the office.

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    • Camping

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    The Mala Man

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Although it is a little hazy as to whether or not the Aboriginal people saw this image and they made Uluru a sacred place. The image of the Mala man on the side of Uluru was instantly the first thing I noticed when I went to the Uluru sunrise tour.

    Since I am sure that most Aboriginals did not have mirrors, do you think they knew this looked like them?

    Points to ponder... in the meantime definitely turn up to Uluru to enjoy a sunrise, and a sunset!

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    The many views of Uluru

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of the most intriquing things about Uluru is that from every angle and every direction, you will get a completely different view.

    I really liked this position, because of so many different angles and colors of the rock at the same time. Rocks, fizzures, slow slopes, and then abrupt edges all together.

    Make sure you take the opportunity to walk up close and also see it from far away, so you can see everything that is Uluru!

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Why is it Red?

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

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    Favorite thing: One of the most interesting things to learn about Uluru is actually why it has its red tinge to it.

    The reason is because this is actually a grey rock with a high amount of iron inside it. When iron reaches the surface, it oxides, and Iron Oxide is better known as.... rust.

    So this entire rock really is just one large rust-bucket!

    If you walk up to the rock, feel free to actually rap your knuckles on a little of it, and you can feel a distinct hollowness to the top layer of the rock!

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Spinifex Pigeon - Geophaps plumifera

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of the great sites while looking at Uluru was the sighting of this cute little pigeon, known as the Spinifex Pigeon which is indiginous to the Northern Territory.

    I can not find out too much more information about the pigeon on the internet to share here, so I guess it is best to just enjoy the picture of him!

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Outback's Protector - Spinifex Grass

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Spinifex Grass (Spinifex Sericeus) is one of the best protectors in Australia's outback. Very painful to the touch because of its long stalk, then the sheer size and abundance of it throughout the country makes it the perfect way to keep the sand from blowing!

    In addition to keeping the sand down, and poking larger animals and humans as it passes, it is also the home and shelter to many of the outbacks small animals who can burrow under it.

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  • sneakye's Profile Photo

    Best time to see the rock

    by sneakye Written Feb 27, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: In my personal opinion - the rock is best at sunset.
    I saw the rock both at sunrise and sunset.
    It's freezing cold in the mornings and you have to get up really early
    (and if you are not a early riser - i'm talkin like 5am) you're not going
    to amused. We saw the sunrise after the sunset and it was dissapointing,
    I was cold and tired and then had to go on a walk through the olgas - of
    course in no time it got really hot and i had to take all the layers off that
    I had worn in the morning.
    Needless to say - the sunset is amazing - take lots of photos. The rock
    really does change colours it is fantastic.

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    Entry Fee & Opening hours of National Park

    by xuessium Updated Nov 20, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The amount is A$16.25 (circa Jun 2003) and is valid for 3 consecutive days. Children under 16, could enter the park for free.

    OPENING HOURS:
    December-February: 5.00am-9.00pm
    March: 5.30am-8.30pm
    Apr: 6.00am-8.00pm
    May: 6.00am-7.30pm
    Jun & Jul: 6.30am - 7.30pm
    Aug: 6.00am - 7.30pm
    Sep: 5.30am - 7.30pm
    Oct: 5.00am - 8.00pm
    Nov: 5.00am - 8.30pm

    Fondest memory: You can email:
    uluru.informationdesk@ea.gov.au
    for more info.
    Tel: 61889563138
    Fax: 61889563139

    Uluru
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