Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Local Customs

  • DOMES AT KATA TJUTA..
    DOMES AT KATA TJUTA..
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA ..SCENE ..ULURU N.P.
    KATA TJUTA ..SCENE ..ULURU N.P.
    by DennyP
  • ONE OF THE
    ONE OF THE "MANY HEADS" KATA TJUTA N.P.
    by DennyP

Most Recent Local Customs in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • AlbuqRay's Profile Photo

    Tjukurpa

    by AlbuqRay Updated Apr 9, 2011
    Tjukurpa of Uluru by Malya Teamay

    The concept of Tjukurpa is complex. It embodies the principles of religion, philosophy and human behaviour that are to be observed in order for people to live harmoniously with each other and the land. The fundamental principle of Tjukurpa is that people and the landscape are inextricably one. Tjukurpa is also the creation period when ancestral beings (Tjukaritja) created the world as we know it, and from this the religion, Law and moral systems.

    Another perspective of Tjukurpa is that it is the traditional Law that explains existence and guides daily life. Tjukurpa is existence itself, in the past, present and future. Tjukurpa provides answers to important questions such as the creation of the world and how people and all living things fit into the total picture of life. It is the basis of the laws that sustain nature and all beings. The Tjukurpa is all around using the landscape itself. Each feature of Uluru has a meaning in Tjukurpa.

    The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park use ticket has a painting on the back, Tjukurpa of Uluru by Malya Teamay. The Anangu people ask that you respect the Tjukurpa by keeping your park use ticket, i.e., not discarding it or giving it away. It depicts the important stories of Uluru. Uluru is represented in the center of the painting by concentric circles. The different shades of color surrounding Uluru show the different land and vegetation (which is all Tjukurpa), crossed by these ancestral beings on their journeys to Uluru. The ancestral beings (Tjukuritja) represented in this painting are:

    Kuniya, the Python Woman with her eggs (top-right);
    Liru, the venomous snake (bottom-right);
    Kurpany, the dog like creature represented by the paw prints (bottom-left); and
    Mala the rufous hare wallaby represented by the wallaby tracks (top-left).

    The footprints and spears represent the warriors of the Warmala revenge party who traveled from west of Uluru looking for Kuniya.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Enjoy an ancient Art Gallery

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sarah and the Mutitjulu!

    Sarah and I enjoyed the cultural walk around the base of Uluru, and one of the most interesting views was in the cave structures where there were paintings that could be as old as 20,000 years (this is based on the fact that some of the drawings have been tested to have no carbon life of their own as it had been absorbed by the rock itself).

    One of the sad things however is that some of the early tour guides used to carry buckets of water to "remove the dust" from the paintings, which of course did nothing but remove some of the art with each bucket sprayed.

    The paintings shown here are part of the Mutitjulu walk, very close to the watering hole.

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  • Nganana Tatintja Wiya - "We Never Climb"

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Uluru

    Uluru is very sacred to the Anangu people. Although it is open for everyone to climb, they ask that out of understanding and education you do not climb the rock and respect their culture and religion.

    The Aboriginal people themselves do not climb the rock, and feel terrible when people get injured as visitors to their land.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    KATA TJUTA ...RESPECT LOCAL CUSTOMS..

    by DennyP Written Sep 16, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    DOMES AT KATA TJUTA..
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    When at Kata Tjuta..make sure that you stay to marked tracks when walking..This area is a sacred sight to local Anangu mens law..many areas are restricted..please respect marked areas..also they request that you use toilets located in the parking area before and after walks..

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  • Poolanos's Profile Photo

    Resist the urge to climb Uluru

    by Poolanos Written Jun 8, 2008

    I found it saddening at Uluru to see plenty of information urging tourists to respect the local aborigines beliefs, requesting visitors not to climb the rock (even a big sign at the base that everyone walks past). Yet you'll see plenty of conquistadors ignoring the request and scampering up the side. Such a beautiful place, so significant to many, and so many ways to enjoy it (like the beautiful, peaceful 4 hr base walk). It just doesn't need to be climbed. And don't forget Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) is equally magnificent in its own right and is only 50km away.

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  • Assenczo's Profile Photo

    Fines, prosecution or both

    by Assenczo Written Oct 12, 2007

    Australia seems to have an abundant arsenal of threatening signs. Along the roads, in the parks, and of course, in the cities, Big Brother is constantly telling yeah what is going to happen next if you do not follow the rules. To some degree the stern tone of the warnings surpasses the voice of similar means of communication in the countries of South America, where they had whole bunch of dictators and military juntas to polish up the grammar. So be aware and behave!

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Local Uluru Lolly Shop

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luke's Berry Farm

    One of the local customs in Uluru is obviously to live off the land. Although European settlers have moved right in, there is still an Aboriginal community here, and their customs are being passed on to the tourists of the area here, mostly by the tour guides like ours from AAT Kings, Luke. Luke was nice enough to share with me the original lolly store, which comes right off the vine.

    It was a small berry that looked very similar to a blueberry, but was nice enough to taste like bark. I still bit right into to it to enjoy the flavor of the outback.... but let me be your guinea pig... unless you are starving, pass on this one!

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Don´t take any stones

    by Myndo Written May 9, 2005

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    As in other national parks all over the world you are also advised here not to take any stones with you.
    Not only because they fear the tourists would transport half of the Uluru away, no.
    It is also bad luck to do so.

    In the visitor centre they have a corner where they show you the stones people have taken with them home and later sent back ... because they suddenly felt uneasy about it. In the letters they sent with the stones they write of the bad luck they had since having the stone...
    So to get rid of the bad luck they returned the stones.

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    REFRAIN from taking photos for parts of Uluru!

    by xuessium Written Mar 21, 2005

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    There are many Aboriginal sacred sites in and around Uluru. The authorities have placed signs all around these sites, advising tourists and hikers to respect Aboriginal culture and sensitivities by not taking photos at these locations. Please do your part as a responsible traveler - respect the wishes of the local people.

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    No pictures, please!

    by Myndo Updated Dec 12, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This time the "no picture available" on the left side is right.

    The Aboriginal people do not want to be photographed.
    No, that is actually not quite right.

    In the visitor Centre you can find a lot of pictures showing Aboriginal people. But on some of them have been stuck papers.

    The explanation for this you can also find there. On the paper is written: this Aboriginal is recently deceased. The picture has been stuck over with paper, in honor to the aboriginal culture, not to exhibit pictures (and names) of the death, so they can find their peace.

    So you could make a picture, but if the person dies, you must erase the picture. (and how could you know of that, so better leave it).
    It is also forbidden to take pictures or make videos in the surrounding of he visitor centre.

    Nothing should be left of the person, nothing reminding of him or her, no pictures and no names, because if you always remember the person, you kind of keep the ghost here on earth and it can not move on.

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Maku

    by Hewer Updated Jul 23, 2004

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    Eating maku

    If you`re lucky, you might get into a situation where you can try `maku`. This is the Pitjantjatjara word for witchetty grub.

    The standard line for unusual culinary fare is "Well, it tastes like chicken"... not in this case! It`s like a mix between egg and peanut butter.

    NB: If you're given a choice, try it cooked. The texture is better :-)

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    PLEASE DO NOT CLIMB ULURU!

    by xuessium Updated Apr 2, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ClimbingUluru

    This is sacred ground for the Aborigines! Please respect their customs by NOT climbing Uluru. It's rude and insensitive.

    Nganana Tatintja Wiya (We Don't Climb)

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  • Paulie_D's Profile Photo

    Don't call it Ayer's Rock

    by Paulie_D Updated Sep 5, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's not as dry as you think

    The Aboriginal peoples of Australia have, quite rightly, asserted their claim to an ancient land / monument.

    As such you are strongly advised to refer to it as ULURU whenever speaking about it.

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  • Paulie_D's Profile Photo

    Respectful Photography

    by Paulie_D Written Jul 20, 2003

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    Be respectful  when taking pictures

    Uluru is a sacred site to the Aboriginal peoples. As such they do not like parts of the rock to be photographed or filmed.

    Where ever possible stick to the designated (and marked) 'Photo' areas.

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