Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Things to Do

  • Starting Back to Valley of the Winds Trailhead
    Starting Back to Valley of the Winds...
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  • Kuniya Walk - Trail to Hunters' Cave
    Kuniya Walk - Trail to Hunters' Cave
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    Valley of the Winds
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Best Rated Things to Do in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Kata Tjuta - The Olgas

    by Myndo Updated May 9, 2005

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    the Olgas

    The Olgas are located 42 km east of the Ayers Rock. Uluru (Ayers Rock) can be seen from there.

    The Olgas consist of 27 round sand stone Domes.
    The Aboriginal name for them is Kata Tjuta, meaning "many heads".

    The biggest one, Mount Olga is 546 m high, wich is 200 m higher than Uluru.

    You can walk around and through them and soak in the special atmosphere.
    Just make sure to take enough water with you. It can get bloody hot!

    There are two major walking trails, namely The Valley of the Winds and The Olga Gorge
    The former takes about three hours and leads you to several deep gorges. The latter leads up to the beautiful Olga Gorge and to its deadened cliff face and a rock pool.

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    Walk Around the Rock is Fun

    by RedEaredPanda Written Sep 28, 2005

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    The dirt is So RED and full of Iron!!  It's beauti

    When you get to the Uluru or the Ayer's rock and you're in mood for some physical activity, besides climbing the rock (which is disrespectful to the aboriginal people), you may choose to walk around the rock. Walking around the rock is in my opinion one of the best ways to see Uluru. We followed the red dirt road around and had a lot of fun taking pictures of all the various formations and creations of shapes and forms on the rock.

    Walking around Uluru leisurely took us around 3 & 1/2 hours. There are benches on few occasions with overhanging trees to create shadows if you decide to take a rest..

    Later on that day, we were in the cultural center in the park and we came upon a bumper sticker that said "I walked around Uluru" so we just had to get it as a souvenir..

    We recommend walking around the rock but please assess your physical capability before you take on the task because once you're half way or so around, there is no turning back.. At points we thought we were just around the corner but we ended up walking another hour or two more to get to where we started from..

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    "VALLEY OF THE WINDS" WALK AT KATA TJUTA..

    by DennyP Written Sep 16, 2008

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    SIGN INFORMATION
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    Be aware that the "Valley of the Winds" walk is steep..rocky and very difficult in places..use extreme care here ..as this is a very isolated place.. 7.4 Kilometers .allow 3 to 3 1/2 hours..carry plenty of water..

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Uluru - rock around the rock

    by vtveen Written Dec 15, 2006

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    Uluru - start of the Mutitjulu Walk
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    Of course we knew Uluru from pictures and looking at these it seemed to be just a solid massive rock in the middle of the Australian desert. But visiting Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park and coming very close to Uluru it was much more.

    Uluru is a red coloured monolith rising from the red plain with height of 348 metres, a lenght of 3 km’s and a circumference of 10 km’s. But even more than this figures tell, the views of Uluru were fantastic when we were driving around and stopped to come as close as possible. We could see the rugged surface of Uluru and it is obvious not a smooth piece of rock. There were amazing holes, caves, valleys and crevices and on some places the red wall of rock rose steep from the surrounding desert.

    We walked the (short) Mutitjulu Walk, more or less into Uluru and were surrounded by rocks and gum trees, which can survive because there is a water hole at the end of the track.
    (It is also possible to do the Base Walk around Uluru: 10 km, which will take 3 to 4 hours.)

    Please don’t climb Uluru !!
    ‘If you worry about Aboriginal law, then leave it, don’t climb it. The chain is still there if you want to climb it. You should think about Tjukurpa and stay on the ground. Please Don’t Climb.’
    Barbara Tjikatu, Anangu traditional owner

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Walk with the Mutitjulu

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

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    After you enjoy the first glimpse of Uluru in the morning with 500 of your closest neighbor campers, head onto one of the tour buses that is headed to the base walk with one of the guided tours. We decided to go on Uluru Sunrise and Base Tour with AAT Kings, which included a tour to the Mutitjulu Watering Hole, and then around the southern side of the rock. The tour will teach you about the bush vegetation and animals, including the Tjukurpa laws that bound the Aboriginal people.

    We enjoyed plenty of the Aboriginal cave drawings, as well as the stories of how Uluru was formed according to the Aboriginal ancestors.

    Enjoy. The tour costs $84 AUD.

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Multitjulu Walk - traces of the Rainbow Snake

    by Myndo Updated May 9, 2005

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    Mutitjulu

    Multitjulu Walk - when walking around Uluru, you will also get to this walk. It is also accessible from a Carpark nearby. It can also be done by wheelchair.

    Length: 1km, 45 Minutes return time.

    The track leads to a waterhole at the rim of the Uluru.
    It is the home of the ancient water snake Wanampi.
    Once there was a fight between this snake and another (evil/dark) one. The traces of the fight can be seen on the Rocks (darker spots and bands and so)
    It is actually interesting, if you have someone who can explain you what happened (according to the story) and where you have to look....

    Easier to see are the rock paintings from the Aboriginal people, these can also be found here.

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Olgas Sunset

    by Hewer Updated Sep 8, 2004

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    The Olgas at Sunset

    The Olgas, known as Kata Tjuta to the traditional owners of the park, are located about 45 kilometers west of Uluru.

    Sunset at the Olgas is definitely worthwhile if you are spending more than one night in the area (sadly, a one night stay is common). There are less people around so it is more low-key than sunset at Ayers Rock, which often involves more than one thousand people in two small areas.

    The Olgas are less famous than their monolithic counterpart but certainly exude their own charm and the sunset there is spectacular.

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    To Climb or not to Climb......?

    by Hewer Updated Jul 24, 2004

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    At the top, with Kata Tjuta in the background

    This could almost qualify as `Must Not See` activity. The traditional owners of the National Park, the Anangu, ask visitors not to climb Uluru.

    The decision of whether or not to climb is entirely up to you. There are plenty of great activities in the National Park that do not involve climbing, among them walking around Uluru and walking through the Valley of the Kings at Kata Tjuta.

    Having said that, I climbed Ayers Rock four times (once for each year I lived there) - 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000.

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Kings Canyon Walk

    by vtveen Updated Dec 15, 2006

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    Kings Canyon
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    One of our main destinations while visiting the Red Centre was Kings Canyon. The only way to see its beauty is to walk around in the Watarrka National Park and in spite of the expected heat we decided to give it a try.
    From our accommodation (Kings Creek Station) we had to drive 35 km’s, but succeeded to reach the car park at 8.30 am. And a lot of other visitors intended to do the same as we: start as early as possible, although the temperature was already 35 degrees Celsius !!

    The Canyon Walk starts with a very steep climb through a kind of staircase with about 500 steps. On the other side of the canyon we had great view of the so called ‘domes’ of the Lost City. After we reached the first rim the track became a little bit easier, although it went up and down over bare rocks, all absolutely red coloured. Sometimes we passed apparently water holes, because in the middle of this harsh landscape we saw trees, palms and other lush vegetation. Almost unbelievable.

    In 1 hour we reached the famous rim of Kings Canyon and we stood a little while completely speechless. This is an absolutely breathtaking and overwhelming scenery. Sheer walls of rock on the other side of the canyon and the green valley far beneath us.
    Because a part of the track was closed (we couldn’t visit the Garden of Eden and the Lost City) we to return along the same track. But with different views and going down it was again a fantastic walk.

    All together it took 2 hours to reach the car park and we were happy being back, because it was getting warmer and warmer. Temperature was already 40 degrees Celsius !! But without any doubt this was one of the highlights of our Australia trip.

    Be aware: this walk can be very difficult, you need steady walking shoes, sunscreen 30+, a hat or cap, if possible a fly net, something to eat and lots and lots of water !!!

    (The Creek Walk is much easier and follows the valley for 1,5 km's)

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  • I would hope you came here to see the rock...

    by grkboiler Updated Dec 17, 2004

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    Uluru

    The centrepiece of the national park is obviously Uluru itself, which is more commonly known as Ayers Rock, or simply "The Rock". The world's largest monolith (not a mountain!) is 318m tall and 8km around its base. Many scientists believe it extends over 3 1/2 miles below the surface.

    Uluru was first discovered by Europeans in 1873. It is named Ayers Rock for the Premier of South Australia, Sir Henry Ayers.

    Uluru, as it is called by its Aboriginal name, is a very sacred site to the Anangu people. You definitely should take a walk around the rock and see the Aboriginal paintings and natural formations. Each one tells a story, and each story is written on a plaque near the paintings and formations. The walk takes a good 3 hours.

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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    ANANGU TOURS at ULURU

    by DennyP Written Sep 16, 2008

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    DESERT COLOURS..BLUE SKIES..ULURU N.P.
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    ANANGU TOURS ..Depart daily from the Cultural centre at Uluru..Anangu guides give commentary in their language of the "Tjukurpa" about thier history and their lifestyle and demonstrate their many bushskills..A real insight into aboriginal bushcraft skills..

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    SUNSET PHOTOGRAPHY..BE EARLY

    by DennyP Written Sep 16, 2008

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    MANY COLOURS OF ULURU AT SUNSET
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    Like everyone else I really wanted to get some good photos of "sunset on the Rock"..although there is a lot of room I was amazed just how many tour busses and cars started arriving just before sunset..so as viewing is just in one location it pays to be early if you are a serious photographer..

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Kathleen Springs

    by vtveen Written Dec 12, 2006

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    Kathleen Springs
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    More or less between Kings Canyon Resort and Kings Creek Station (our accommodation) is a turnoff from the sealed Luritja Road. After about 500 metres dirt road we reached the car park and we were surprised there were just two other cars.

    Here starts a walkway into the gorge with absolutely ‘crazy’ rock formations of red and almost orange rocks. Further along the walkway were some information boards, explaining the Aboriginal culture and the recent cattle industry in this part of the desert. Unbelievable to realise that cattle could live in this harsh landscape.

    After 1300 metres the walk ended at the spring fed waterhole: Kathleen Springs. This waterhole was surrounded by reed and other vegetation and surrounded by red coloured rock walls. It would have been a fantastic place to stay a little bit longer, but as always the flies …..

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    Mereenie Loop Road - desert adventure

    by vtveen Updated Dec 11, 2006

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    Mereenie Loop Road - 'sometimes a highway'
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    After Gosse Bluff we reached Larapinta Drive, coming from Alice Springs and Hermannsburg, and we had driven 71 km’s, most of them on a dirt road and it took more than 2 hours. Till that moment we hadn’t seen any human being or other car.

    After the turnoff to the Aboriginal village of Areyonga, the real Mereenie Loop Road started. We crossed kilometre after kilometre through the desert, sometimes the road was dead straight and then winding along and over hills. Sometimes it was like a ‘motor way’ and then again for kilometres like a washboard. It felt quite comfortable to have a 4WD on that parts of the road.

    But everything around us was red coloured: the dusty road, the desert as far as we could see and the termite mounts.
    To be honest it is not the most scenic drive one can imagine, but at least it is quite an adventure driving through this landscape, more or less on your own. Just now and then a cloud of red dust announced an oncoming car.

    Although officially not permitted we made some stops along the road, before reaching ‘Jump-up’ rest area and look out, just north of the Morris Pass. From this point we had a view of the Georg Gill ranges with King’s Canyon.

    After the Morris Pass the road was much better and there were even road constructions. Did read about plans to seal the Mereenie Loop Road; so if you want to have a really adventure in the Australian desert you have to hurry.

    Mereenie Tour Pass is available at the Information Centre in Alice Springs, Glen Helen Resort and Kings Canyon Resort. It costs AUD 2,- and comes with a booklet with a lot of information about the journey.

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    Let the Sun go down on Kata Tjuta without you

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

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    Watch the sunset while enjoying a drink with a local tour group on the trip to Uluru and Kata Tjuta. The package includes a great hike through the Valley of the Winds, then onto a viewing station where you can sip on champagne and nibblies while watching this beautiful view.

    The view is worthy of a picture every 3 minutes or so, allowing you to see the subtle changes of the coloration on the Olgas.

    Our tour started around 3pm, and the sunset near 7pm. From there, we headed back to Yulara, where we enjoyed a beautiful barbeque under the stars, ending with a little astronomy lesson from the guides.

    AAT Kings was our tour guide for this entire journey and did an excellent job!

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