Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

  • KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    by DennyP

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

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    BE CAREFUL WHILE HIKING HERE..

    by DennyP Updated Oct 26, 2011

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    KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
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    ULURU AND KATA TJUTA NATIONAL PARK.
    ..Take extra care when walking and hiking in this park...make sure that you have good comfortable shoes or hiking boots...make sure that you are always with someone..and always be careful climbing on these loose rocks as a fall or a twisted or broken ankle out here is a disaster..this is a REMOTE area...and most likely your cell phone won't work here...and remember... the flying doctor is your hospital here...always carry plenty of water as this can get extremely hot here..ALWAYS TAKE EXTREME CARE HERE..

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Get to the Rock Early...

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Uluru Viewing Area

    If you are a serious photographer, or just want to enjoy a good position where people are not constantly walking in front of you for the sunrise or sunset, then I would highly recommend getting to the Uluru viewing stations early!!

    As you can see in the picture, there are plenty of people that are there 30 minutes before the daylight even totally breaks!

    As a general rule, the tour groups head out 90 minutes before sunlight, so if you get on the road about 60 minutes ahead of time, you should be able to park properly before the bus' get everyone ready and loaded and make it over there.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    To climb or not to Climb....

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Well, let me give you the full story from both sides, so you can make your decision.

    1 - It is not illegal or immoral to climb to the top of Uluru. Even the Aboriginal people do not forbid it, they just ask politely for you not to.

    2 - The reason the Aboriginal people ask you not to climb is not because it is a sacred site per se, it is just that they would feel sadness for you, your family and for themselves for allowing you to climb the rock in case you fell off and joined the 30+ people who have died on the rock's property. (Many more have died as a result of their rock experiences, via heartattack, stroke, or other physical exertion).

    3 - There is really nothing to see at the top. After all, the things you want to see and experience are much better on the ground around the base of the rock. On top, there is nothing but a view of the Outback. On the ground you can see paintings, watering holes, rock formations, and sometimes waterfalls!

    After all this, make an educated decision, its your choice.

    Sarah and I chose to respect the wishes of the traditional land owners of this property, so we did not climb!

    Nganana Tatintja Wiya - 'We Never Climb'

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  • pugwashman's Profile Photo

    Don't climb it

    by pugwashman Updated Feb 11, 2009

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    Uluru (Ayers Rock)

    Lots of visitors go to Uluru to climb the rock, but resist the temptation and do one of the many walks around the bottom instead. Uluru is a sacred sight for the Aborigines and there are signs everywhere asking people to respect this and not to climb, but people still take no notice. We did take notice and didn't climb, and don't feel we missed out in the slightest. Besides which the Climb is closed on many days due to winds, rain, high temperatures etc.
    So come on peeps, show a bit of respect.

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    • National/State Park

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  • Assenczo's Profile Photo

    This is not a pet!

    by Assenczo Written Sep 16, 2007
    Emu on a reconaisance mission
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    One of the advantages of Curtin Springs is the presence of the wild life of Australia that proves to be so elusive on and around Ayer’s Rock. For a quick preview, the courteous owners have provided the visitors with a snap-shot of birdlife of any size that otherwise would roam the continent so inconspicuously that one might never see it. The biggest attraction is her majesty the EMU, presumably because size matters. Moreover, she is free and the others are stuck in the cages to sing and shout as much as they can. Most important lesson for the Uluru authorities and a top-on-the-wish-list item for the tourists is that emus and kangaroos should be hopping all around the Rock to give it more authenticity and charm.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    No Solitude for Sunset

    by AKtravelers Written Jul 4, 2007

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    Crowds at the sunset viewing area

    Sunset at Uluru is supposed to be a surreal experience. It was for me, but not in the expected way -- after all, clouds deflected the setting sunlight away from the rock and all we got to see was a shaded monolith gradually go dark (apparently I was to blame for climbing the rock in the first place). Instead, it was interesting and a bit disturbing to watch tour bus after tour bus pile into our parking lot and set up camp for the sunset. If you expected solitude in the middle of this vast empty continent called Australia, you must have breathed too many tour bus fumes. At least 1500 people watch sunset every night, so don't be surprised.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Annoying Australian Black Flies

    by AKtravelers Written Jun 16, 2007

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    Dressing smartly for the flies at Uluru

    As mentioned on my Australia page, there are no non-biting insects in the world more annoying than the buzzing, moisture-obsessed Australian Black Flies. Usually, there aren't too many of them in the winter at Uluru, which is bad news for you summer visitors since they were still very annoying in May. This couple was smart enough to purchase netting to keep the flies away from the nose, mouth and eyes -- their (the flies) favorite places.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Religious Travel

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  • davidjb83's Profile Photo

    Dont Climb

    by davidjb83 Written May 3, 2007

    There is a walkway and rail to climb but id ask people not to as its offensive. This place is sacred. Me and my friends walked around it and i think this is just as amazing. Show respect while you are here.

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    DON'T LOSE YOUR PARK TICKET

    by 850prc Written Feb 16, 2007

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    Your precious Uluru-Kata Tjuta park use ticket

    When you enter Uluru-Kata Tjuta, you'll be purchasing a park entry ticket. Much like a passport, you'll need to keep this ticket with you and close at hand. There are supposedly "snap inspections" by park rangers, although we didn't face any.

    What you WILL need is your ticket anytime you go into or out of the park area...and you do this a lot as you travel (for example) between Uluru, your campsite, the Olgas, the Valley of the Winds, etc. You don't want to get caught outside without your ticket, as it may cost you another $25 Aussie dollars to get back in.

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    The Anangu wish you would NOT climb Uluru

    by 850prc Written Feb 16, 2007

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    Uluru.  The Anangu wish you'd look and NOT climb

    One of the highlights for many visitors to Uluru or Ayers Rock is to actually climb the rock. And while the view is reportedly stunning, and the sense of accomplishment huge, do remember that this park and this land is sacred to the Anangu. They clearly feel that your climbing the rock is harmful and disrespectful to them and their culture. In every document produced, every service spot announcement, they literally BEG you NOT to climb Uluru.

    Considering that I didn't want to be sore for the next three days, passing on the climb was made even easier knowing that it was the right thing to do for our hosts. :)

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    Uluru is beautiful, but a harsh environment

    by 850prc Written Feb 16, 2007

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    A well-hydrated Sara, out on the trail
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    Exploring and enjoying Uluru-Kata Tjuta is an experience of a lifetime. But, never lose site of your surroundings and its dangers. The following are from the official Uluru-Kata Tjuta Visitors Guide:

    (1) Stay on marked trails.
    (2) Always walk or climb with one other person
    (3) Carry and drink one liter of water for every hour you walk or climb in hot weather
    (4) Wear sturdy boots, a hat with a secure strap, a long sleeved shirt and max protection suncreen.
    (5) In the hottest weather, restrict climbing and walking activity to cooler parts of the day
    (6) DO NOT TRY TO RETRIEVE THINGS THAT HAVE BEEN DROPPED OR THAT HAVE BLOWN AWAY ON THE TRAIL, ESPECIALLY IF CLIMBING ULURU.

    If you feel ill or have been injured, stay where you are and have someone contact a park ranger. Rangers can be contacted at any time by using emergency alarms available at
    (1) Mala walk carpark, base of Uluru
    (2) Kuniya Piti water tank at eastern end of Uluru
    (3) Kata Tjuta dune viewing, along Kata Tjuta road
    (4) Walpa gorge carpark at Kata Tjuta
    (5) Valley of the winds carpark at Kata Tjuta
    (6) Valley of the winds walk at the "T" junction, Kata Tjuta

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    FLIES

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    They are extremely annoying. They seem to follow you on all your hikes and everywhere you go (thankfully not the hotel room). They drive you bonkers and even get you to slap yourselves. Many of them are very quick but some are slower and more annoying!

    You can buy nets to wear over your head (which we didnt). Next time, I think I will bring a dustbuster to get them!

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Vallay of the Winds Walk: STEEP CLIMB

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

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    Part of the valley of the winds walk has an extremely steep climb. If you are able to climb it, it is rewarding. Just lean forward and maksure that in case anything happens you will fall forwards and not break your back.

    It is not very scary though. Just take your time and most people can do it.

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Driving: ROAD KILL

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    The roads in the outback are good sealed roads. However there are many slight hills along the way, which under normal circumstances wouldnt make one bit of a difference. However, here the animals crossing the street get struck all the time.

    Be careful of wildlife when going over the hills, not only for live animals but dead ones. You could injure yourself if you hit a dead large animal. We saw kangaroos (with a vulture eating out its eyes) and a camel.

    Dont kill any poor animals and take care of yourself.

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Kings Canyon Rim Walk: STEEP CLIMB

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

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    The Rim walk starts with a very steep climb up the mountain with small stone stairs. Although there is a path, you have to forge your way a little bit. You may have to stop a few times before reaching the top (yes it is that steep!).

    If you have any fear of heights or do not have a sure step, do not go on this hike. There are many places where the path takes you right to the cliff and certain areas where you have to climb without railings on narrow stones. This is not an easy hike.

    CAVEAT EMPTOR

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