Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

  • KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    by DennyP

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Kings Canyon Rim Walk: WATER

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    Once you start your ascent, there is no water source for drinking. Be sure that you have ample water. I left one of my water bottles at the bottom and I was very dehydrated when we finished the walk. Bring 1 L of water per person for each hour hiking.

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Be prepared for lots of annoying flies

    by MLW20 Written Jun 28, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    See the flies on my hat

    As you visit Uluru and the Olgas, flies are everywhere. They will be flying in your face (expect to swallow a couple) and also be all over the back of your shirt. Bring bug spray!!! Some people buy bug nets to wear over their hats to cover their face. The nets look silly but is probably worth wearing.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Don't Go if it is cloudy!

    by ATXtraveler Written Apr 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One thing that you will notice about the tours at Uluru is that they are fairly expensive. I felt that most of the tours were very good value as we learned alot, and really enjoyed the attitude and professionalism of the tour guides.

    Having said that, make sure you look at the weather before you book your tours however.... we went on 5 tours with AAT Kings, of which 4 were excellent. The 5th was not so great, mainly because it was overcast and cloudy for our sunset tour. The tour guide was sincere when he said "well, we can't change that!". I agree with him, but still, we were paying almost 100 dollars each, and all we really got was one shade of Uluru and plenty of wine!

    Ok... turning off the whining.... it was still a nice evening!

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    Weather alert

    by Restless-in-kl Updated Feb 24, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Being in the outback brings extreme weather temperatures and landscape. It can get really hot /dry in summer or really cold/dry in winter. Best be prepared. Here's what you must have :

    Summer months
    - Wide brim hat
    - Sunglasses and sunblock
    - Lotsa of water
    - Insect repellant
    - Cover your shoulders, arms and legs to prevent sunburn
    - Good walking shoes (preferably covered)

    Winter months
    - Wide brim hat
    - Sunglasses and sunblock
    - Lotsa of water
    - Warm jacket
    - Body lotion
    - Good walking shoes (preferably covered)

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    To Climb or Not to Climb

    by Restless-in-kl Written Feb 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saw a number of people doing the climb but was not tempted to due to the multiple signs advising people not to.

    The climb crosses an important dreaming track, which has been a cause of sadness and distress among traditional owners. Neverthless, they are unable to prohibit climbing, and climbing Uluru is a popular attraction for a large fraction of the many tourists who visit it each year. A rope handhold makes the climb easier, but it is still quite a long and steep climb and many intended climbers give up partway up. There are several deaths a year as a direct result of climbing the rock, mainly from heart failure.

    As this is a sacred site, I believe we should respect the wishes of these Aboriginal owners.

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    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    Staining from Ayers Rock

    by Restless-in-kl Written Feb 23, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sandstone

    Ayers Rock is a large sandstone formation. It's rich, orche colour leaves stains on unsuspecting visitor's shoes and clothes if you wear light coloured items.

    My light coloured khaki pants came back with some orangy hues.

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    • National/State Park

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  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    No Photography Please

    by RedEaredPanda Written Oct 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    No Photography in some parts of Uluru

    There are certain parts of the Uluru where you will find signs such as the picture warning and reminding visitors not to take photographs of the rock.. Parts of the rock are sacred areas, either men's or women's and hence the aboriginal people ask people not to take photographs.. My picture is of the sign only and not the part of the rock the sign was refering to..

    Although parts of Uluru are sacred to the aboriginal people, all of Kata Tjuta is men's sacred area.. Hence to this date, some aboriginal women while driving by kata tjuta or the Olgas, turn their head and do not look at the men's sacred rocks!! Very interesting how the tradition is kept to this date in some families... *

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  • RedEaredPanda's Profile Photo

    The Uluru Climb Is Dangerous

    by RedEaredPanda Written Sep 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Climbing Uluru may lead to serious injury or even

    Despite Anangu Aboriginal wishes for visitors not to climb Uluru, many do. Climbing Ayer's Rock is quite dangerous if the climber is not experienced and not in the best physical shape and capability. Many People have died while attempting to climb and many others have been seriously injured.

    The climb to the top is in two parts.. The first part is the climb or walk to the part where the chain begins and the next is the chained portion to the top. We stood there and watched many people attempt to climb the rock to the start of the chain and couldn't.. The climb is a bit steep and they were discouraged and turned around and walked back down.

    Hence if you find yourself in the situation where you've decided to climb the rock against its traditional owners wishes and you have overcome the "respect" issue, you should assess your physical capability to climb the rock right from the start before you reach the chained portion of the climb.. If it feels not right, turn around and walk back down!!

    There is always the option of walking around the Ayer's Rock which many people decide to do, including myself!!!

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  • pugwashman's Profile Photo

    Flies, flies, and more FLIES !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    by pugwashman Updated Aug 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Count the flies

    As stunning as Uluru is, and it is, it is also where the majority of the flies in Australia congregate to play a game of "enter the orifice". The mouths an easy target so not too many points for that, but up the nostrils is a bit more tricky so that's worth a few extra points, as is the ear and landing directly on the eye. If any other orifices come into play then you've really only got yourself to blame !! Basically the flies are everywhere, and you will not be able to keep them off. You try and tell yourself to ignore them but then one goes up your nostrils or down your throat and I defy anyone to ignore that ... YUK.
    Still, I guess they were there first.

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  • AmazingAdventures's Profile Photo

    WATCH OUT FOR EMU

    by AmazingAdventures Written Apr 5, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Broken windscreen after the Emu effect

    I took the bus from Adelaide to Alice Springs, normally about 18 hours via Greyhound.

    Unless you have an Emu hit your windscreen (windshield). this photo was takena few minutes after an unformtuate feathered friend tried to cross the road in front of the bus.

    The Emu did not survive the impact. The windscreen was badly shattered. The bus driver pulled over and taped up the cracked window, and then boarded it up - we were in the middle of nowhere, so no chance of getting another bus or replacing the glass.

    this accident occurred on the main road around 10:30am, we were supposed to arrive in alice at 4pm, but since the window was not fully stable, the driver had to reduce his speed for the rest of the trip, so we ended up arriving in Alice after 6pm - 2 hours late.

    There is also a big danger of hitting kangaroos in the middle of the night on the road, depsite the most experienced drivers, sometimes accidents with the animals in the outback just can not be avoided.

    Be prepared for anything while travelling in the outback!

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  • AmazingAdventures's Profile Photo

    FIRE HAZARD in the OUTBACK

    by AmazingAdventures Written Apr 5, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The regeneration process in the Outback

    Lots of fires in the outback are started by lightning. This one was surrounding the road entrance to Uluru and all the traffic was stopped for about 45 minutes, while we waited for the fire danger to reduce.

    Due to the massive water shortage in these dry parts, they usually do not put alot of effort forward to put out the fires unless they pose extreme danger, normally these fires just take their natural course and life goes on.

    Much of the vegetation in this area actually THRIVES on the fires and are born again when the rain comes.

    During my several days in the outback, there was more than a few fires that were burning very close the road

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    ADVICES FROM THE PARK AUTHORITIES

    by xuessium Written Apr 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As below:
    1) Stay on the marked track.
    2) Always climb with another person.
    3) Carry and drink 1litre of water for every hour you are out in hot weather.
    4) Wear sturdy rubber soled shoes, a hat with a secure strap, a long sleeved shirt and maximum protection sunscreen.
    5) Go out in the coolest part of the day.
    6) Do not climb if you have high or low blood pressure, heart problems, breathing problems, a fear of heights or if you are not fit.
    7) Do not try to retrieve things that have blown away from the climbing track.
    8) Do not drink alcohol or eat a large meal before you walk or climb.
    9) Obey all instructions, notices and warning signs.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    PLEASE DO NOT CLIMB ULURU!

    by xuessium Updated Apr 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ClimbingUluru

    This is sacred ground for the Aborigines! Please respect their customs by NOT climbing Uluru. It's rude and insensitive. Besides, every year, there will be always be at least one death, from careless climbers who slipped and came crashing down to Earth.

    Note: The authorities will not allow climbing on days when weather is bad.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Hold on to the Rope on Uluru!

    by Lildeer Written Mar 9, 2005
    Going up is easier than down

    Aboriginals honor Uluru as their most sacred religious site. It is climbed by select members of the group as a rite of passage into adulthood.Tourists are encouraged to respect Aboriginal wishes not to climb Uluru.

    If you decide to make the trek, however, be forewarned: a memorial at the bottom remembers the 30 odd tourists that have died in the attempt.

    Wear hiking shoes (no thongs or sandals), carry water with you, and leave the heavy backpack at the bottom. There is no vegetation on the monolith to save you from falling, and little below to cushion your fall, so hold on to the rope!

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • BerniShand's Profile Photo

    DOS AND DONTS

    by BerniShand Written Jan 10, 2005
    uluru

    when you buy your entrance pass you will be given a list of dos and donts

    these ARE enforced, and penalties are high
    the penalty for removing any earth material is a whopping $5,500 and a criminal offence

    interfere with any animal or plant life, or cause any damage to the heritage site and the fine is $55,000

    the Aboriginal people have treasured and cared for Uluru for thousands of years, please respect their culture and this special part of the Earths heritage

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

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