Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

  • KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
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  • KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
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  • KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
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Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • Traveling to the park

    by grkboiler Written Dec 17, 2004

    Driving to the park will take you through miles and miles of land with nothing around. Make sure that if you do take a car, you have plenty of supplies in case of a problem. Also do not pick up hitchhikers - with all this empty space, if you disappear for some reason, there is a good chance nobody will ever find you, plus you don't know who is out there.

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  • Climbing Uluru

    by grkboiler Updated Dec 17, 2004

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    Although it is recommended you do not climb Uluru, many people can't help themselves to a once-in-a-lifetime chance to do it.

    People have died over the years trying to climb the rock, so take any safety issues seriously, including the type of shoes to wear, not climbing in extreme heat, and taking your own physical health into account.

    If you have high blood pressure, heart disease, breathing problems, or problems handling the heat, it is a good idea not to climb.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Be prepared for the Walk

    by Myndo Updated Aug 31, 2004

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    Remember on all walks that it is important to be well prepared.

    Wear a hat, strong shoes, long sleeves and sunscrean for protection.

    In the hotter months you should carry and drink one litre of water per hour and conduct all strenuous activities during the cooler early morning hours.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Flies!

    by Hewer Updated Jul 25, 2004

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    Hiding from the flies at Lake Amadeus

    There are few places on earth with flies like Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park and its environs. They pursue anything that walks in a desperate quest for moisture. You`ll find yourself swatting constantly as you move about. It makes eating outside a near impossibility, and even talking is a risk as your open mouth becomes an inviting target.

    You can get used to it after a few days, one thing you can do is purchase a fly net to place under your hat. These don`t cost much more than a few dollars and are available in most souvenir shops and kiosks.

    It is worth mentioning that there are much fewer flies between May and August.

    In this case, I didn`t have a flynet. I just wrapped my cloak around my face in frustration :-)

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Don`t try to catch the Reptiles

    by Hewer Written Jul 24, 2004

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    Perentie

    Pictured here is a perentie, native to the national park and the second largest lizard in the world after the komodo dragon. It can grow to two and a half meters in length.

    There are some seventy species of reptiles in the National Park. Whilst many are harmless, some can deliver a painful and even lethal bite. The best policy is to just leave them alone.

    (The man pictured here is a professional handler :-)

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Spinifex: Be Careful!

    by Hewer Written Jul 24, 2004

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    The Olgas with Spinifex in the foreground

    Be extra careful of spinifex when going off any desginated walking trail.

    Spinifex is hardy arid-region grass and has several varieties. It grows very slowly and hard spinifex is sharp and very strong.

    Usually the worst you`ll get is a scratch or a minor cut, but it can be more serious. I fell heavily in patch of spinifex, causing splintering in my left tibia.

    Spinifex covers about twenty percent of the Australian continent. The patches of spinifex in the foreground of this picture are between five and ten years old.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Be extra careful when 4WDing

    by Hewer Updated Jul 23, 2004

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    No way out?

    If you head off-road, make sure you have the right equipment to get yourself out of a bind.

    Whilst there are usually large numbers of visitors around the main attractions of the National Park, some of the service roads and fire trails, especially outside of the park, might see less than one vehicle per day. Many areas are not serviced by conventionmal communication networks.

    One friend of mine got stuck in the dunes by Lake Amadeus and had to walk thirty kilometers back to the resort. Not to mention the reovery costs.

    This photo was taken ten kilometers north of Ayers Rock Resort. We got stuck deliberately in this case just to practice ;-)

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Dingoes

    by Hewer Updated Jul 22, 2004

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    Dingoes, near the Camel Depot, Ayers Rock Resort

    Don`t approach dingoes if you encounter them. They tend to be shy of humans anyway and will generally slink away if you approach.

    They will often appear where food is being cooked outdoors or where people regularly leave scraps behind. Remember to throw away your leftovers and don`t try to feed them - they look fairly docile but are capable of some serious damage if cornered or provoked.

    There have been a few injuries over the years, often bites to the hand, to people trying to feed these animals.

    Related to:
    • Desert

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  • marki's Profile Photo

    Climb the rock early

    by marki Written May 31, 2003

    It gets pretty hot on the rock during the day, particularly in Summer. So its best to leave early. The rock climb oftern closes to climbers by 10.00 am in Summer if the temperature is expected to be over 37 C. One of the commonest causes of problem on the rock are exhaustion and heat stroke.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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  • Xemx's Profile Photo

    Flies and Hot Weather

    by Xemx Written Apr 4, 2004

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    The desert at King's Canyon

    It will get very hot so make sure you drink plenty of water and use sunscreen. Beware of the flies - there's tons of them!

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Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

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