Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

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Best Rated Warnings and Dangers in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Annoying Australian Black Flies

    by AKtravelers Written Jun 16, 2007

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    Dressing smartly for the flies at Uluru

    As mentioned on my Australia page, there are no non-biting insects in the world more annoying than the buzzing, moisture-obsessed Australian Black Flies. Usually, there aren't too many of them in the winter at Uluru, which is bad news for you summer visitors since they were still very annoying in May. This couple was smart enough to purchase netting to keep the flies away from the nose, mouth and eyes -- their (the flies) favorite places.

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    The Anangu wish you would NOT climb Uluru

    by 850prc Written Feb 16, 2007

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    Uluru.  The Anangu wish you'd look and NOT climb

    One of the highlights for many visitors to Uluru or Ayers Rock is to actually climb the rock. And while the view is reportedly stunning, and the sense of accomplishment huge, do remember that this park and this land is sacred to the Anangu. They clearly feel that your climbing the rock is harmful and disrespectful to them and their culture. In every document produced, every service spot announcement, they literally BEG you NOT to climb Uluru.

    Considering that I didn't want to be sore for the next three days, passing on the climb was made even easier knowing that it was the right thing to do for our hosts. :)

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Be extra careful when 4WDing

    by Hewer Updated Jul 23, 2004

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    No way out?

    If you head off-road, make sure you have the right equipment to get yourself out of a bind.

    Whilst there are usually large numbers of visitors around the main attractions of the National Park, some of the service roads and fire trails, especially outside of the park, might see less than one vehicle per day. Many areas are not serviced by conventionmal communication networks.

    One friend of mine got stuck in the dunes by Lake Amadeus and had to walk thirty kilometers back to the resort. Not to mention the reovery costs.

    This photo was taken ten kilometers north of Ayers Rock Resort. We got stuck deliberately in this case just to practice ;-)

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  • Hewer's Profile Photo

    Don`t try to catch the Reptiles

    by Hewer Written Jul 24, 2004

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    Perentie

    Pictured here is a perentie, native to the national park and the second largest lizard in the world after the komodo dragon. It can grow to two and a half meters in length.

    There are some seventy species of reptiles in the National Park. Whilst many are harmless, some can deliver a painful and even lethal bite. The best policy is to just leave them alone.

    (The man pictured here is a professional handler :-)

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    PLEASE DO NOT CLIMB ULURU!

    by xuessium Updated Apr 2, 2005

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    ClimbingUluru

    This is sacred ground for the Aborigines! Please respect their customs by NOT climbing Uluru. It's rude and insensitive. Besides, every year, there will be always be at least one death, from careless climbers who slipped and came crashing down to Earth.

    Note: The authorities will not allow climbing on days when weather is bad.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    No Solitude for Sunset

    by AKtravelers Written Jul 4, 2007

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    Crowds at the sunset viewing area

    Sunset at Uluru is supposed to be a surreal experience. It was for me, but not in the expected way -- after all, clouds deflected the setting sunlight away from the rock and all we got to see was a shaded monolith gradually go dark (apparently I was to blame for climbing the rock in the first place). Instead, it was interesting and a bit disturbing to watch tour bus after tour bus pile into our parking lot and set up camp for the sunset. If you expected solitude in the middle of this vast empty continent called Australia, you must have breathed too many tour bus fumes. At least 1500 people watch sunset every night, so don't be surprised.

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    Weather alert

    by Restless-in-kl Updated Feb 24, 2006

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    Being in the outback brings extreme weather temperatures and landscape. It can get really hot /dry in summer or really cold/dry in winter. Best be prepared. Here's what you must have :

    Summer months
    - Wide brim hat
    - Sunglasses and sunblock
    - Lotsa of water
    - Insect repellant
    - Cover your shoulders, arms and legs to prevent sunburn
    - Good walking shoes (preferably covered)

    Winter months
    - Wide brim hat
    - Sunglasses and sunblock
    - Lotsa of water
    - Warm jacket
    - Body lotion
    - Good walking shoes (preferably covered)

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  • pugwashman's Profile Photo

    Flies, flies, and more FLIES !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    by pugwashman Updated Aug 17, 2005

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    Count the flies

    As stunning as Uluru is, and it is, it is also where the majority of the flies in Australia congregate to play a game of "enter the orifice". The mouths an easy target so not too many points for that, but up the nostrils is a bit more tricky so that's worth a few extra points, as is the ear and landing directly on the eye. If any other orifices come into play then you've really only got yourself to blame !! Basically the flies are everywhere, and you will not be able to keep them off. You try and tell yourself to ignore them but then one goes up your nostrils or down your throat and I defy anyone to ignore that ... YUK.
    Still, I guess they were there first.

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    Staining from Ayers Rock

    by Restless-in-kl Written Feb 23, 2006

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    Sandstone

    Ayers Rock is a large sandstone formation. It's rich, orche colour leaves stains on unsuspecting visitor's shoes and clothes if you wear light coloured items.

    My light coloured khaki pants came back with some orangy hues.

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Vallay of the Winds Walk: STEEP CLIMB

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

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    Part of the valley of the winds walk has an extremely steep climb. If you are able to climb it, it is rewarding. Just lean forward and maksure that in case anything happens you will fall forwards and not break your back.

    It is not very scary though. Just take your time and most people can do it.

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  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Be prepared for the Walk

    by Myndo Updated Aug 31, 2004

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    Remember on all walks that it is important to be well prepared.

    Wear a hat, strong shoes, long sleeves and sunscrean for protection.

    In the hotter months you should carry and drink one litre of water per hour and conduct all strenuous activities during the cooler early morning hours.

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  • Restless-in-kl's Profile Photo

    To Climb or Not to Climb

    by Restless-in-kl Written Feb 23, 2006

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    Saw a number of people doing the climb but was not tempted to due to the multiple signs advising people not to.

    The climb crosses an important dreaming track, which has been a cause of sadness and distress among traditional owners. Neverthless, they are unable to prohibit climbing, and climbing Uluru is a popular attraction for a large fraction of the many tourists who visit it each year. A rope handhold makes the climb easier, but it is still quite a long and steep climb and many intended climbers give up partway up. There are several deaths a year as a direct result of climbing the rock, mainly from heart failure.

    As this is a sacred site, I believe we should respect the wishes of these Aboriginal owners.

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  • pugwashman's Profile Photo

    Don't climb it

    by pugwashman Updated Feb 11, 2009

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    Uluru (Ayers Rock)

    Lots of visitors go to Uluru to climb the rock, but resist the temptation and do one of the many walks around the bottom instead. Uluru is a sacred sight for the Aborigines and there are signs everywhere asking people to respect this and not to climb, but people still take no notice. We did take notice and didn't climb, and don't feel we missed out in the slightest. Besides which the Climb is closed on many days due to winds, rain, high temperatures etc.
    So come on peeps, show a bit of respect.

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  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Kings Canyon Rim Walk: STEEP CLIMB

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

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    The Rim walk starts with a very steep climb up the mountain with small stone stairs. Although there is a path, you have to forge your way a little bit. You may have to stop a few times before reaching the top (yes it is that steep!).

    If you have any fear of heights or do not have a sure step, do not go on this hike. There are many places where the path takes you right to the cliff and certain areas where you have to climb without railings on narrow stones. This is not an easy hike.

    CAVEAT EMPTOR

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Be prepared for lots of annoying flies

    by MLW20 Written Jun 28, 2006

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    See the flies on my hat

    As you visit Uluru and the Olgas, flies are everywhere. They will be flying in your face (expect to swallow a couple) and also be all over the back of your shirt. Bring bug spray!!! Some people buy bug nets to wear over their hats to cover their face. The nets look silly but is probably worth wearing.

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking

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