Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

  • KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    KATA TJUTA..SCENE..
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    KATA TJUTA ..SCENE
    by DennyP
  • KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    KATA TJUTA..ONE OF MANY DOMES...
    by DennyP

Best Rated Warnings and Dangers in Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

  • marki's Profile Photo

    Climb the rock early

    by marki Written May 31, 2003

    It gets pretty hot on the rock during the day, particularly in Summer. So its best to leave early. The rock climb oftern closes to climbers by 10.00 am in Summer if the temperature is expected to be over 37 C. One of the commonest causes of problem on the rock are exhaustion and heat stroke.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Kings Canyon Rim Walk: WATER

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    Once you start your ascent, there is no water source for drinking. Be sure that you have ample water. I left one of my water bottles at the bottom and I was very dehydrated when we finished the walk. Bring 1 L of water per person for each hour hiking.

    Was this review helpful?

  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Driving: ROAD KILL

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    The roads in the outback are good sealed roads. However there are many slight hills along the way, which under normal circumstances wouldnt make one bit of a difference. However, here the animals crossing the street get struck all the time.

    Be careful of wildlife when going over the hills, not only for live animals but dead ones. You could injure yourself if you hit a dead large animal. We saw kangaroos (with a vulture eating out its eyes) and a camel.

    Dont kill any poor animals and take care of yourself.

    Was this review helpful?

  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    FLIES

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    They are extremely annoying. They seem to follow you on all your hikes and everywhere you go (thankfully not the hotel room). They drive you bonkers and even get you to slap yourselves. Many of them are very quick but some are slower and more annoying!

    You can buy nets to wear over your head (which we didnt). Next time, I think I will bring a dustbuster to get them!

    Was this review helpful?

  • davidjb83's Profile Photo

    Dont Climb

    by davidjb83 Written May 3, 2007

    There is a walkway and rail to climb but id ask people not to as its offensive. This place is sacred. Me and my friends walked around it and i think this is just as amazing. Show respect while you are here.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Assenczo's Profile Photo

    This is not a pet!

    by Assenczo Written Sep 16, 2007
    Emu on a reconaisance mission
    1 more image

    One of the advantages of Curtin Springs is the presence of the wild life of Australia that proves to be so elusive on and around Ayer’s Rock. For a quick preview, the courteous owners have provided the visitors with a snap-shot of birdlife of any size that otherwise would roam the continent so inconspicuously that one might never see it. The biggest attraction is her majesty the EMU, presumably because size matters. Moreover, she is free and the others are stuck in the cages to sing and shout as much as they can. Most important lesson for the Uluru authorities and a top-on-the-wish-list item for the tourists is that emus and kangaroos should be hopping all around the Rock to give it more authenticity and charm.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • BerniShand's Profile Photo

    DOS AND DONTS

    by BerniShand Written Jan 10, 2005
    uluru

    when you buy your entrance pass you will be given a list of dos and donts

    these ARE enforced, and penalties are high
    the penalty for removing any earth material is a whopping $5,500 and a criminal offence

    interfere with any animal or plant life, or cause any damage to the heritage site and the fine is $55,000

    the Aboriginal people have treasured and cared for Uluru for thousands of years, please respect their culture and this special part of the Earths heritage

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Desert
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Hold on to the Rope on Uluru!

    by Lildeer Written Mar 9, 2005
    Going up is easier than down

    Aboriginals honor Uluru as their most sacred religious site. It is climbed by select members of the group as a rite of passage into adulthood.Tourists are encouraged to respect Aboriginal wishes not to climb Uluru.

    If you decide to make the trek, however, be forewarned: a memorial at the bottom remembers the 30 odd tourists that have died in the attempt.

    Wear hiking shoes (no thongs or sandals), carry water with you, and leave the heavy backpack at the bottom. There is no vegetation on the monolith to save you from falling, and little below to cushion your fall, so hold on to the rope!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Traveling to the park

    by grkboiler Written Dec 17, 2004

    Driving to the park will take you through miles and miles of land with nothing around. Make sure that if you do take a car, you have plenty of supplies in case of a problem. Also do not pick up hitchhikers - with all this empty space, if you disappear for some reason, there is a good chance nobody will ever find you, plus you don't know who is out there.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Xemx's Profile Photo

    Flies and Hot Weather

    by Xemx Written Apr 4, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The desert at King's Canyon

    It will get very hot so make sure you drink plenty of water and use sunscreen. Beware of the flies - there's tons of them!

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock)

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) sightseeing.

View all Uluru National Park (Ayers Rock) hotels