Sports Events in Australia

  • Jet Ski Hamilton Island
    Jet Ski Hamilton Island
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  • Then enter a surfing competition!
    Then enter a surfing competition!
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    Attacking shot
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Most Viewed Sports & Outdoors in Australia

  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Sydney: Climb the "Coat-Hanger" !

    by globetrott Written Dec 18, 2014

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    Since the year 1998 it is possible to step up to the very top of the Harbour Bridge in Sydney, the local people also call it "Coat Hanger". I did not do it, but from some distance I could watch a group of people doing it. This adventure is not cheap at all, and yet it seems to be quite hard to get one of the few tickets that are available.
    The biggest downpoint for me would be the fact that it is totally forbidden to take my camera with me, when climbing up the bridge.
    You will get special dresses and you will be breath-tested for alcohol before you will start to climb the bridge in small groups of people, who are fixed to each other on a rope, just like in the mountains.
    Calculate a total time of at least 3 hours for the adventure !

    Equipment: no special equipment necessary, BUT good shoes will be essential !

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    a great swimmingpool in Boorowa

    by globetrott Written Dec 13, 2014

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    I was driving around in my small motorhome and mostly it was quite hot at the end of November and I did not find a lot of places along my way to relax a bit in a swimmingpool. Here in Boorowa I found a large swimmingpool, right next to the large recreation-area in the centre of the village. I did not get inside, as it was closed already,when I arrived but I could take a look through the fence and can imagine that it is the best place to spend a great day, when it is hot in the spring or summertime. I was there in November and it was a really hot day there !
    The Boorowa Memorial Pool is open daily from 01.00pm till 06.00pm !

    Equipment: bring your own

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    Archery On the Road

    by pedroswift Updated Jul 29, 2013

    Having been born under the Star Sign Sagittarius (the archer), pedroswift has been unable to overcome a predilection towards the noble art/pastime/sport of Archery. "de tir à l'arc" in French...from tirez "to pull" - pull the curve. It congers up the beauty and the utility of the instrument - the bow.
    As a result of this interest, it is only natural that your scribe carts Archery equipment with him when he and his navigator head off on Road Trips in Australia.
    There are many field archery clubs in Australia with outdoor ranges that are available to archers who are non club members as long as they meet certain conditions.
    Although your scribe does not use his bow to hunt animals, he has no philosophical prejudice against those archers who do so as long as they are skillful and ethical in their pursuit. After all, Pope John Paul II was a bow hunter during his younger days after WW2, feeding his fellow seminarians game hunted with bow and arrow.
    One of the facets of archery in Australia is Bow Hunting. There are many clubs in both urban and country locations that have amalgamated themselves under the Australian Bowhunters Association
    A.B.A. Clubs usually welcome members of other clubs who are members of the Association.
    They may allow visitors to use their ranges on payment of a "range fee" typically 5 dollars a day. Ranges may be available 7 days a week even if the clubhouse is not open. Some may restrict visitors to days upon which the club is open (weekends and public holidays).

    So when planning a road trip, your scribe usually checks the ABA web page to find likely places along the way where practice targets are available. The ABA website displays ABA clubs with address; web site if it has one; &/or a contact phone number.

    Equipment: It is best to bring your own archery equipment.
    Keep in mind crossbows are not allowed.
    Clubs may conduct training days during which a small fee will allow visitors to borrow equipment from the club and receive tuition on both the physical aspects of archery and the safety rules observed on archery ranges.

    Typical target (only feral animals are pictured) quite a few ABA clubs in Oz some ranges make it difficult
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    White Water Rafting in Rainforest

    by martensd Written Feb 3, 2013

    Thinking about my rafting trip after answering a forum question, decided to send out this tip for those thinking about diving on the Barrier Reef in Cairns Australia.
    Yes I did the reef and had an incredible trip.
    But as a white water rafter in the U.S.A. (and Costa Rica), I was thrilled to find that there was an excellent river to raft in a tropical rainforest a few hours outside of Cairns.

    We booked a trip with Raging Thunder White Water (another company is R & R). After a long but enjoyable bus ride, we got to the river, where we broke into groups, met up with our individual guides and got some quick lessons on the river, paddling and river etiquette.
    We hit the river and hit about 45 rapids from class 2 to a couple class 4/5 rapids.
    About half way through, we had an excellent river lunch and then finished off the rest of the river.

    There were a number of places that you can jump out of the raft (and some you would rather NOT)
    and have a very nice and relaxing time floating on your back down the river.
    Then back to the outfitters to get your t-shirts and pictures of your trip and then....the long ride home.
    I highly recommend this trip for both river rats and novices.
    Add that to your diving on the reef and your action packed Cairns trip will be complete....or....

    Equipment: The outfitter will have all the equipment you need.
    Sunglasses with a strap is important as is sun block. Quick dry shorts and light shirt. Change of clothes for the ride home.
    Bring one of those waterproof disposable cameras.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel
    • Rafting

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Raiders of the Lost Arch - made it!

    by iandsmith Written Aug 21, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We made good progress but then the sandstone wall ended and, despite looking, we hadn’t sited the arch. The next obstacle was a crossing over Gap Creek but we decided to go on top of the rock face and have a look but, as Ken got to the top it looked like we’d drawn a blank so I said I’d head off across the creek and, if I couldn’t see it, we’d head back.
    No sooner had I started out than Ken yelled he’d found it; so I joined him and there it was, in a clear spot on top of the rock face with views across a valley where we could see clouds building up for the predicted afternoon storms but we were too excited about our find and scrambled to get pictures of it before the occasional drop became a downpour.
    We gingerly walked across it, the type of thing men seemingly have to have to do to prove who-knows-what, and took several pictures of each other doing it as proof of our manhood or stupidity before we were satisfied. That coincided with the rain starting to fall a little more earnestly so we moved back under the canopy though it soon eased so we went down to the streamlet again to photograph its erratic course through vines and moss laden boulders for the third time that day.
    We had a nice session before the gloom returned and foretold that our day in the Watagans was rapidly coming to an end with the coming of heavy raindrops this time so we spurted back down the trail and reached the car without getting too drenched and rocked up to our favourite cafe (they have pies) in Cooranbong. The only difference here was that Ken didn’t leave blood on the floor and a squirming bloated leech to remind other patrons we’d been there like last time and thus we celebrated our finding of the “lost” arch.

    Equipment: Rub vaseline or such around your ankle where the top of your socks are to prevent leeches sucking your blood.

    Ken atop the arch Eucalypt with large knot Gap Creek with Ken in the background The arch from below Gurgling Gap Creek
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Raiders of the Lost Arch

    by iandsmith Written Aug 21, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I can’t even remember who the man was, can’t remember where I met him, only remembered that he knew where the arch was; the arch I’d read about in some obscure document in a research library. He’d told me how to get there, gave me some little known details and had related how it was hard to find even if you knew where you were going.
    It was like an ache; it wouldn’t go away and kept coming back when my mind was on other things. And it wasn’t really anything at all, just an arch secreted away in the bush; one of only three apparently in the whole Hunter Valley.
    Heck, I’d been in America just two months previously and had visited a national park with over 2,000 of them in an area not even as large as the valley. Still, it gnawed at me.
    Ken was keen to go and have a look as well so we made a date and then postponed it but eventually we headed off for the Watagans, for that is where the arch was to be found.
    At the Gap Creek carpark we checked our gear and rubbed Vaseline around our ankles to keep the leeches at bay that had pestered us last time before moving off.
    The trail is easy to follow initially; in fact, we’d started out on it last time but rain came and we called it quits when we were shooting some Bridal Veil Stinkhorn fungi. We had no such problem today and stopped several times to shoot more fungi then pushed on until, as the man had warned me, we came to where a large tree had fallen over the trail and after that the track was difficult to follow.
    We slid over the log and moved on, at times not sure where the trail actually was but making headway in the general direction anyway though at times the walking was tough as we negotiated steep slopes with few toeholds. In time we found ourselves beside a cliff face, partially laden with mosses and lichen and luckily with a narrow clear path alongside.

    Equipment: Wear good walking shoes or boots, take water with you.

    Gurgling Gap Creek Pynconoporous (orange) above Schizophyllum cluster Phellinus fungus Beside the sandstone wall
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Bungee Jumping (AJ Hacket in Cairns)

    by darthmilmo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is no better trill then those that come from the sky. AJ Hacket, the original bungee jump creators, has a site in Cairns. I didn't bungee jump though. Instead, I took a plunge on the giant Minjin Swing, which is a giant swing in the jungle. I have ridden this type before, but boy was it fun. Anne, a fellow traveler who joined me on the ride, and I screamed our hearts out as we reached 100km an hour flying through the jungle in the safety of the swing.

    Minjin Swing (AJ Hacket in Cairns)
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Bungy Jumping
    • Adventure Travel

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Salty’s Dive shop and the Venus II

    by darthmilmo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Salty’s is a PADI certified dive shop that caters to both English and Japanese speakers. Venus II is the vessel that took us to the Southern Great Barrier Reef on a trip of a lifetime. It went on for 3 magical nights and 3 wonderful days. Circus Kris was the British instructor in charge of the diving on the boat. Throughout the next few days, the small group of divers and non-divers onboard became like a family. Ashley was the Captain and Andy was the second-mate as well as being one of the best cooks in Australia.

    Diving was great! We got to see so many exotic fish, sharks, turtles, corral, crustaceans, and more. We dove on several amazing places in and around several islands located in the southern Great Barrier Reef. We dove inside and outside the lagoon at Lady Musgrave Island, on the unprotected beautiful reefs around Lady Elliot, and dozen of more sites.

    The trip offers more then diving. We got to see humpback whales on their migration path, a school of dolphins swimming along the boat, several curious sea turtles showing their head above the water, and more. We also got a few excursions into several of the islands. We had a few hours to walk on the infamous Lady Musgrave Island. We also were among the last tourists to walk on Fairfax Island before it closed down as an exclusive natural bird sanctuary.

    In between dives, whenever we had some leftover energy (which is not common) we went out snorkeling. It is true what they say, you sometimes see more snorkeling then diving. On one occasion, Sandra and I saw even followed a turtle that showed us the way to a giant sting ray, then it in turn led us to 5 more turtles in a row; finally we saw a small white tip shark before we had to swim back to the boat.

    The trip on board the Venus II was not only amazing, but unbelievable cheap. For the price of a regular dive trip we got to see more things that usually cost more money. This include whale watching, diving off Lady Eliot Island, as well as a visit to Lady Musgrave Island!

    Getting ready to go underwater!
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Beaches

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Sea Esta - Great Barrier Reef and Yongala

    by darthmilmo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I boarded the "Sea Esta", a live-aboard dive boat operated by Pro-Dive in Townsville. The crew were Kim (skipper from Australia), Nathan (young Kiwi instructor with a thick accent), Charlie (Britt instructor), and Glen (Aussie cook). I spent some time with the fun crew and friendly internationally diverse passengers. We all had a pleasant time this trip. We all enjoyed some fun dives followed by interesting conversations. In the evenings we relaxed and had fun.

    This is one of the best dive trips in Australia. You get to dive 8 times in the Great Barrier Reef. Then, on the return journey you get two wonderful dives on one of the most impressive wrecks in the world, the SS Yongala Wreck. Read all about it on my relevant “Must see” tips.

    The daily routine for the trip went as follows. You wake up to a light breakfast, followed by the 1st dive, followed by the 2nd breakfast, followed by the 2nd dive, followed by lunch, followed by the 3rd dive, followed by afternoon tea and biscuits, followed by the a night dive (4th dive), followed by dinner and dessert. At times I felt they were just feeding us in there...hehehe. Alas, as in any dive trip, we were always exercising. In a way, diving is like running... imagine running for over 40 minutes 4 times a day! That's how hungry we get :).

    SS Yongala Wreck
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Aussie Rules Footy

    by keeweechic Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Aussie Rules Football is a mixture of soccer, gaelic football and rugby and was originally created to keep cricketers fit during the winter months. During the lat 1850’s the first game was played in Melbourne and has changed and grown over the years into a huge national sport. The season usually lasts 18 weeks depending on the number of teams competing. Then there is the final series which are a knockout series where teams are eliminated when they lose, with the last two teams playing off in the Grand Final which is a big annual event in Australia.

    The game is played over 4 quarters and stops at the end of each quarter so that the teams can change ends for their goals. Each quarter lasts roughly about 20 mins. A player must always be tackled below the shoulders and above the knees. A player must bounce the ball approx every 10 meters when running with the ball and a player must either handball or kick when disposing of the ball. At each end of the ground there are 4 white posts. To score players attempt to kick the ball between the two taller posts at their end of the field. If the ball travels or rolls between the two white posts without being touched it is 6 points (goal) scored for that team and the ball is taken back to the centre where the game begins again. If though the ball hits the white post, it is a point to that team and the opposition team has a free kick back into play. If the ball is handballed or knocked through the posts by either team, it is a point to the team kicking towards that end. If the ball travels between a goal post but inside the red post, it is a point scored. If the ball hits the red post it is out of bounds. A goal is worth 6 points and is scored when the ball is kicked between the white posts. One point is scored when the ball hits the goal post, travels between a goal & behind post or is handballed or knocked through any scoring area.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Formula One Grand Prix

    by keeweechic Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Annually in March, The Australian Formula One Grand Prix is held around Albert Park in Melbourne and draws hundreds of thousands of people to what is the most prestigious racing category in the world.

    There are also other displays such as stunt bikes, jet-plane fly-overs and aerial displays.

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    Visitors at Green 9

    by tini58de Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    These vistors at the 9th green made playing golf a little more difficult!!!

    The owner of the golf course pointed out to us, that at the 9th green there were always many kanguroos and that some golfers were rather trying to hit them instead of putting the ball in the hole...!

    kanguroos
    Related to:
    • Golf

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  • unravelau's Profile Photo

    Australians on the whole are pretty sports minded.

    by unravelau Updated May 30, 2010

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    While enjoying my once a month breakfast at the beach two sundays ago, I was reminded of how sports conscious Australians are. It is not unusual where I live to see the triathalon taking place on any weekend really. They (the athletes) can be seen jogging, bicycling or swimming pretty seriously and despite weather conditions, that would send me back to bed.

    Anyway, some, on this day even managed to half invite themselves for a cuppa and a chat...........LOL.

    Equipment: I am pretty sure that if you are a participator in this kind of event you would be well equipped and have your specific likes and dislikes, although everything that you would need can be purchased here.

    Triathalon in progress Foreshores area at the Jetty Coffs Harbour
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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    Daytrips

    by SirRichard Written Sep 1, 2009

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    Travelling around Australia you will find hundreds of daytrips and activities in every place you go. In most backpackers & hostels there are many many leaflets offering you 1-2-3 days trips to visit nearby interesting places. You can make the reservations there at reception desk and they pick you up at the hostel gate. Most include lunch.

    Leaflets at Dougies Backpackers
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel

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    Round the Rock (Uluru)

    by SirRichard Written Sep 1, 2009

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    If you visit Uluru (Ayers Rock), instead of climbing the rock (sacred, so it's a bit of an offence to aboriginals), go walking all around. There is a tracl around the rock (more than 10 kms I think) and it's a nice walk, as you can see closer details of the many holes, caves and wrinkles that Uluru has got. It took me about 2.3 hours to get around. Bring water, good shoes and a big hat. There are 2 water taps in case you run out of water.

    A closer view of Uluru
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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