Bathurst Off The Beaten Path

  • Ben Chifley Dam
    Ben Chifley Dam
    by balhannah
  • Ben Chifley Dam
    Ben Chifley Dam
    by balhannah
  • Rockley
    Rockley
    by balhannah

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Bathurst

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    O'CONNELL

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    O’CONNELL, is another small town classified by the National Trust. It was Surveyor George Evans, who I had previously read about in Bathurst, who crossed the plains in 1813 naming them O’Connell Plains. The small village of O’Connell was not settled until the 1820's, when it became a staging post on the main western road from Sydney to Bathurst.
    Desert Ash trees line the street from Bathurst end, commemorating locals who lost their lives in WW1. There was an old Hotel, built in 1865, and a gorgeous small church that somebody has made as their home.

    O’Connell is located in a picturesque setting, just 18kms south east of Bathurst.
    There are plenty of nice picnic spots and a hotel with pub meals and accommodation

    LOCATION.....On the Bathurst to Oberon road, near Bathurst end.

    Church @ O'Connell Cottage at O'Connell On the way to Chifley Dam
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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    WALKING SOFALA

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    This little village is easy to walk, and if you have picked up the “WALKING SOFALA TOUR” you will be able to enjoy it more.

    The only place that was doing plenty of business when we visited, was the Royal Hotel that was established in 1862. It’s a typical early goldfield’s Hotel. The Hotel does have accommodation available.

    In this same street were some lovely old weatherboard Cottages, the Post Office, which was built in 1879. Hyland’s Hotel was interesting, it is now a private residence.

    There are 18 buildings listed on the pamphlet, dating back to 1860.

    Located 45kms north of Bathurst, via Peel & Wattle Flat

    Sofala Weatherboard cottage in Sofala Royal hotel at Sofala
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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Old buildings of SOFALA

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    With a map in hand, these are some of the old buildings I saw in Sofala.

    The 1st one is a good example of a slab timber shed.
    When he First Fleet arrived in 1788, only a few carpenters and a small supply of poor-quality tools were brought out from England. This meant the colonists were forced to build sheds and homes out of any natural materials. They tried the traditional British wattle and daub method, where clay or mud was plastered over the weave to make a solid wall, this didn't work the best in Australia, as heavy rains destroyed the walls. Then they found building with timber and bark worked better!
    Bark was often used for the roof, but in my photo, you can see corrugated iron was used instead.

    I still have the brochure, but have had difficulty remembering which goes with which, so have just left the rest unamed, as I may put the wrong description with the photo!

    slab timber shed Another old home
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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    ROCKLEY MILL MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    Located in the main street of Historic Rockley, is the Mill, a red brick building that was built in 1864. It is now the town's museum with displays of historic mill machinery, historic clothing, old newspapers with interesting reading ...............

    AND old police records for the district

    One of Australia's most famous Bushrangers, "BEN HALL" and his gang arrived in Rockley in 1863. In October 1863, Ben Hall and his gang arrived at the home of Harry Keightley. Keightley had little time for bushrangers and a fierce battle broke out in which one of Hall's comrades, Mickey Burke, was killed.
    Unfortunately Keightley ran out of ammunition and was captured by Hall who forced Keightley's wife to ride to Bathurst and claim the £500 reward for killing Burke.

    OPEN .....11.30am - 4.30pm on Sundays and Public HolidayS.

    Rockley Mill Museum
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    • Museum Visits

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    CHURCHES OF ROCKLEY

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    St Patrick's Roman Catholic Church (1870) and St Peter's Anglican Church (1867) were designed by a Mr. Edward Gell, the architect who designed the beautiful gates of the Bathurst Gaol.

    St Patrick's is typically High Victorian Gothic style made out of local rubblestone with a slate roof, a rather pretty Church.....and........
    St Peter's has decorative brickwork and an iron roof and a slate steeple.

    ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH ST. PETER'S ANGLICAN CHURCH
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    • Religious Travel

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    VISIT ROCKLEY- OBERON -BEN CHIFLEY DAM

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    We did a round tour from Bathurst to Oberon, had hoped to see “Mayfield Gardens” near Oberon which are one of the best in Australia.
    Unfortunately, they were only open on the weekend, so did not get to see them. These gardens are open in October.
    ADMISSION IN 2015
    Water Garden ticket prices
    Adult $10 Chd $5 (children 0-6yrs free)
    Family $25 (2Ad + 2Chd)

    Mayfield Garden ticket prices
    Adult $25 Chd $10 (children 0-6yrs free)
    Family $65 (2Ad + 2Chd)

    CHECK THE WEBSITE FOR PRICING AND DETAILS ON THE GARDEN.

    We did find ROCKLEY, which is another historical village, listed by the National Trust.
    It is one of the oldest settlements outside of Bathurst. Copper & Gold were also found in this area, and once again, there are some lovely old buildings. Ben Hall, the bushranger, held up the Bank of New South Wales (b1878)

    There is a nice park, which has Public Toilets which is located beside the weir on Pepper's Creek. The water was so clear that I could see quite a few Fish.

    The drive to and from Rockley was pretty, altogether this was a scenic & interesting day's outing.

    pretty setting in rockley Hotel in rockley Looking down onto Rockley Rockley Rockley
    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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    BEN CHIFLEY DAM

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    The building of this Dam commenced in 1947, and wasn't completed until 1956. The Dam, named after a Prime Minister of Australia name Ben Chifley, is located on the Campbell River, and is a nice area for water sports or that quiet holiday by the water.

    It has a picnic area with shelters, BBQ's, a Children's playground with a flying fox, Toilet block and a safe swimming beach.
    There are two boat ramps if you have your own boat, or you can hire equipment from the Kiosk.
    Fishing is allowed.

    There are different types and levels of Cabins, with the Mediterranean cabin (has 3 units) sleeping between 4-9 people.
    The Pacific Cabins are fully self-contained with 6 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and kitchen & living
    rooms, and they sleep between 16 - 20 people.
    You need to bring bed linen, blankets, towels, pillows, food drinks, perhaps extra chairs.
    The Cabins are what was used by the Athletes in the Sydney Olympic games in 2000.

    Bookings and information on the Cabins is through the Bathurst Visitor information centre at 1 Kendall drive, Bathurst

    It looks a nice place for a water sport holiday.

    Located on 20mins from Bathurst...Take the Perthville road and follow the signs to the Dam.

    Ben Chifley Dam Ben Chifley Dam
    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Water Sports
    • Sailing and Boating

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    VISIT SOFALA from BATHURST

    by balhannah Updated Jan 25, 2015

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    A nice day trip from Bathurst is to Sofala, pronounced So-far-lah.

    This is “AUSTRALIA’S OLDEST SURVIVING GOLD TOWN.” At this time, thousands of people called Sofala home.

    This town dates back to the beginning of the Gold rush in 1851. Located in a valley, whichever way you enter, you have nice views of this little village. We came down the hill from Ilford, this was the nicer way of entering the village. I thought it gave the best views.

    The streets are narrow, the surviving buildings are old, it’s like stepping back in time!

    Pick up a “Self-Drive” tour of Sofala brochure from the Bathurst Information centre before leaving on your drive.

    Located 45kms north of Bathurst, via Peel & Wattle Flat.

    Coming down the hill into Sofala Looking down on Sofala
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    • Road Trip

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    The gold that built Bathurst

    by iandsmith Written Feb 8, 2006

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    Of all the old gold mining towns in New South Wales Sofala is one of the most interesting and unusual.
    Its cousin down the road, Hill End, has much more to offer but you should tarry awhile here and soad up the genuine village atmosphere and an authentic charm that remains from its days as a gold rush town.
    It's basically little more than two streets that have no formal construction, no curbing and guttering and yet which can legitimately claim to be 'Australia's oldest surviving gold town'.
    Sofala is situated just over 40kms out of Bathurst in the Turon River valley.
    If you drive past the museum the road follows a picturesque part of that stream.
    Sofala came into existence as a direct result of the goldrush which had been precipitated when Edward Hargraves discovered gold at Summerhill Creek on 12 February, 1851. There are many who will tell you that Hargraves was the first but, in point of fact, other discoveries preceded his but they were deliberately kept quiet by those in power at the time. Eventually word got out and by June that year a tent city spread across the valley and both the Royal Hotel and a General Store were built in 1851. By 25 June more than 200 ounces of gold taken from the Turon Valley to be sold in Bathurst.
    The rush was extraordinary. When the local landowner realised he would never move the miners off his land he became a butcher and started selling mutton.

    Delightful setting of Sofala
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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    University Campus Tour

    by phoebelosophy Written Jun 7, 2004

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    A lot of high school students take advantage of the university tour, as it's "Open Day Everyday". But you don't have to be a student to take the tour.

    Charles Sturt University - Bathurst is actually quite a lovely campus, with modern buildings set against a country backdrop.

    As you can see in the picture I snapped, there are even a few resident kangaroos!

    If you're in the area, the campus tour is a great idea for a beautiful quiet stroll!

    Kangaroos on campus
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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