Blue Mountains National Park Favorites

  • Brabourne garden
    Brabourne garden
    by iandsmith
  • Ilion garden
    Ilion garden
    by iandsmith
  • Private garden
    Private garden
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Favorites in Blue Mountains National Park

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Leura Gardens Festival

    by iandsmith Updated Oct 5, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rustling's Garden statue
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Every year, about the first week of October, Leura has a garden festival. Several locals open up their gardens to the public for about 10 days. You can visit them yourself in your own transport or catch a shuttle bus that goes around.
    If you get lucky you might even find a garden that's open that's not on the list, as I did in 2012.
    If you'd like a little tip from me, try not to say one is better than the other, what they are is different. Where one has some Australian natives, mature and young, another has a classic cold climate garden with moss laden paths whilst still another is open with spectacular views across the valley.
    You can enter each garden individually and pay at each venue or buy a ticket to see the lot. Basically, if you're going to see four or more gardens, get the overall ticket. It works out very inexpensive if you go to them all, which you can comfortably do in a day, and the money goes to charity anyway.

    Fondest memory: The garden named Blue Mist is that favourite of most people simply because it has stunning views over the valley. If you keep your eyes open here you'll also notice some wonderful stone work behind some of the stepped garden.
    There's so much colour, at times it's dazzling, especially if the sun's out.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Women's Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    More Leura Gardens festival

    by iandsmith Written Oct 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brabourne garden
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Seemed a shame to waste all my pictures so I thought I'd throw in a few more, mainly because nobody reads travelogues.
    The lady in the last picture, Claudia Fisk, is actually the owner/creator of the garden.
    Once you're in Leura the signs are everywhere and maps are freely available at all the gardens as well as the Tourist Information Centre.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Vere Gordon Childe

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 20, 2012
    Last view that V Gordon Childe saw

    Favorite thing: Childe was a noted archaeologist and philologist who specialized in European pre history. In addition, he was also a devout Marxist. Once upon a time he was both Director and Professor of European Prehistory at the Institute of Archaeology in London.
    In mid 1956, Childe decided to retire from his position as Director a year prematurely and gave the impression to one good friend of his that he felt that his academic career should come to an end. The archaeological discipline had rapidly expanded and changed across Europe during the 1950s, leading to increasing specialisation of different areas and making the synthesising, that Childe was known for, increasingly difficult. That year the Institute was moving to a new premises in Bloomsbury and Childe wanted to give his successor, W.F. Grimes, a fresh start in the new surroundings. To commemorate his achievements, the Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society published a Festschrift edition on the final day of his Directorship which contained contributions from people all over the world, something that touched Childe deeply.
    Upon his retirement, he mentioned to many of his friends that he planned to return to Australia, visit relatives and then jump off a cliff. The reason mentioned for this was that he was terrified of becoming old, senile and a burden on society.
    Noticing his body functions deteriorating, he suspected that he had cancer.
    In England he sorted out his affairs and donated much of his extensive personal library and all of his estate, to the Institute of Archaeology.
    After a vacation spent visiting archaeological sites in Gibraltar and Spain in February 1957, he sailed to Australia, reaching Sydney on his 65th birthday.

    Fondest memory: As an amazing turnaround, the University of Sydney, which had once barred him from working there, now awarded him an honourary degree.
    He travelled around the country for the next six months, visiting various family members and old friends. He was unimpressed by what he saw of Australian society, coming to the opinion that the it had not progressed in any way since the 1920s, having become reactionary, increasingly suburban and un-educated.
    Meanwhile, he also began to investigate the prehistory of Australia, forming the opinion that there was much for archaeologists to study in this field and he gave several lectures to various archaeological and leftist groups. In the final week of his life he even gave a talk on Australian radio in which he argued against the racist and dismissive attitude of many Australian academics towards the Indigenous Australian peoples of the continent.
    Before his death he wrote letters to many of his friends on a personal note.
    He also wrote a letter to W.F. Grimes, requesting that it not be opened until 1968. In it, he described his fear of old age and stated his intention to take his own life, remarking that "Life ends best when one is happy and strong."
    On the morning of 19 October 1957, Childe went walking around the area of the Bridal Veil Falls in the Blue Mountains where he had grown up. He had left his hat, spectacles, compass, pipe and Mackintosh atop Govett's Leap at Blackheath, before jumping 1000 feet to his death.
    His death certificate claimed that he had died from an accidental fall whilst studying rock formations and it would only be in the 1980s, with the publication of his letter to Grimes, that his death became recognised as a suicide.
    Later noted archaeologist Neil Faulkner said he believed that part of the reason why Childe decided to take his own life was that his "political illusions had been shattered" when he had lost faith in the direction being taken by the world's foremost socialist state, the Soviet Union.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Grand Canyon - a different view

    by iandsmith Written Mar 12, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Weird rock formations beside the trail
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: I remember a noted writer and T.V. presenter suggesting that you should always look back so as not to miss a photo opportunity. She cited an example and had produced a wonderful shot of the Napalese foothills.
    I mention this because I deliberately did the Grand Canyon loop in a different direction this time to my previous few trips and, lo and behold, as usual I saw things differently.
    I was mainly after a shot of a feature I call the shower. It's a waterfall that forms a wet curtain and looks so beautiful when it's running properly; i.e. when there's a lot of water around.
    That aside, I also got to veiw other places from different perspectives and it backed up my view that it's the best day walk in the Blue Mountains, I hope you agree.
    The 2 1/2 hour walk I managed in around 4 1/2. Of course, I did take around 250 photographs so I guess I have some excuse.

    Fondest memory: It was such a perfect day for pictures, almost 100% cloud cover and lots of water which makes it tricky when you reach the numerous creek crossings but excellent for the waterfalls.
    Though I was focused on getting down the shower which was about 80% of the way through my trek; I was seeing areas in different ways and had to stop to take pictures constantly, passing by an English couple and about 15 canyoners on the way.
    The lushness of the area was almost unprecedented and precipitation oozed from every second rock slab.
    Then I eventually got to the shower and it was special and I finally managed to nail it to my satisfaction and later on saw some fungus which finally justified why I'd carried my macro gear around. Hope you enjoy.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Empress Falls

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 18, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Watery delights
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: This is your reward at the base of the steps. It is about the third of many on this walk. The falls have cut a meandering path through the soft sandstone to get this far.
    This serene and tempting picture should be coupled with a warning. In January 2005 a person died here. Caught in the wrong place at the wrong time (when a storm had just dumped heaps of water) he perished at what normally is a very safe spot (except for the occasional slippery rock).

    Fondest memory: Of course, as shown in the other pictures, there is much more to Empress than just the one, much photographed, fall. Beyond down the trail there is much more from the tiny to the wonderful.
    I hope that the other pictures convey that image.....pardon the pun

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    LOST CAMERA'S @ SCENIC WORLD.

    by balhannah Updated Mar 1, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This bit of information may be of help if you have lost your Camera at Scenic World.

    If a camera is handed in, then they try to find the owner.

    A picture off its memory card is taken and put it up the 'lost property' page of the website. If the owner sees the picture and recognises it, he or she can email them, giving their name and address, the make (and preferably model) of the camera, and a description of a couple of other pictures that will be on the memory card. Given sufficient proof, they will post the camera back at there expense, pretty good, eh?

    Email your claim to: Scenic World

    TIP: Print your name and address on a piece of white paper, photograph it and always leave that photo on the card that's in the camera. If you lose the camera, this will make it easier for the finder to get it back to you.

    Fondest memory: http://www.scenicworld.com.au/index.php/scenic-world-info/lost-cameras-en

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    SCRIBBLY GUMS

    by balhannah Written Nov 22, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When I was walking the "WALLS LOOKOUT TRACK" I noticed that there are quite a few Scribbly gums in the area. ( eucalyptus)

    Have a look at these Trees as they are quite different.
    This eucalyptus tree has a very smooth, pale trunk with distinctive brownish 'scribbles' over it.
    These are made by the larvae of the tiny scribbly moth. These larvae are harmless to the tree and, though found on many eucalypts, it's only in a few varieties where the signatures become the most pronounced feature of the tree.

    Once you know what you are looking at, then you will be able to find them in other states and areas of Australia.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MEMORIAL GARDENS & PLAYGROUND

    by balhannah Updated Nov 15, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Playground equipment
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Travelling with children you often need to find a nice park, where you can rest, and the children can channel their energy into the play equipment.

    A really nice park in the Blue Mountains is Memorial park at Blackheath.
    It has picnic tables & shelters, Electric BBQ's, a swimming pool that is open during summer and is FREE, a lake and ducks and excellent play equipment.

    Fondest memory: Turn off the highway into Govett's leap road, and take the 3rd turn to the left, down Prince Edward Road at Blackheath.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • supercarys's Profile Photo

    Bushwalking

    by supercarys Updated Apr 22, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bright sunny day in Autumn
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: When you are walking through the bush, take a look from every clear point you can find, you will almost certainly be rewarded with a great view.

    Much of the bushwalking trails in the mountains wind around the sides of mountains and cliffs so even though it may not be a major lookout, you will see the view from another perspective.

    Fondest memory: The thing I miss most about the Mountains when I'm not here is the smell of the bush, the feel of the hard earth beneath my feet and the sounds of the birds and wildlife crackling through the undergrowth.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • saw50st8's Profile Photo

    Water

    by saw50st8 Written Sep 14, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Make sure to travel with enough water! As always when hiking, water is hard to find and you do not want to dehydrate in the middle of the forest! Always carry at least 1 L of water per hour per person in hot weather, though I would do this even in cooler weather. Always better to have too much water than too little.

    Was this review helpful?

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Blue Mountains Map

    by aussirose Written Nov 25, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Blue Mountains Map

    Favorite thing: Here's a map that shows the towns and railway stations of the Blue Mountains. The train leaves Sydney Central Station and you'll notice that after Penrith, the scenery will change as the train winds and climbs the mountain. It's a nice trip.

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • gonzo747's Profile Photo

    Take enough water with you

    by gonzo747 Written Oct 18, 2005

    Favorite thing: If you go hiking in tha Blue Mountains you should take at least a liter of water. If you're in Katoomba it's best to buy it in the center. You can get water at the visitors center at the three sisters , but they only had half liters which wasn't enough and more expensive.
    And when i went i needed more then that half liter.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Blue Mountains National Park - Three Sisters

    by ATXtraveler Updated Jun 28, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Three Sisters

    Favorite thing: I would never be able to do justice to what the tour operators and other historians have already done in regard to the story of how the three sisters were formed. Whether you are interested in Aboriginal History, or just a beautiful landscape, Echo Point offers this beautiful view in the heart of Katoomba.

    If you are interested in the stories, just Google Three Sisters Katoomba, and you will plenty of explanations.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Blue Mountains National Park - Wentworth Falls

    by ATXtraveler Updated Jun 28, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wentworth Falls

    Favorite thing: Here is another shot of the scenic vista, that you can visit from the Wentworth Falls portion of the Blue Mountains National Park. It was only a couple hundred steps down the side of the hill from the parking area, and took 10 minutes down, and maybe 15 to climb back up. Definitely worth 30 minutes of your time!

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Blue Mountains National Park - Wentworth Falls

    by ATXtraveler Updated Jun 28, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wentworth Falls

    Favorite thing: Wentworth Falls Walking Trail is the home to a wonderful Waterfall view in the heart of the Blue Mountains National Park.

    The highlight of this walk are the forests of eucalypts and angophoras, as well as the great view of Wentworth Falls. There are three different trail distances from novice to advanced!

    Bring some water in the summer time, as it does get pretty hot!

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Blue Mountains National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

88 travelers online now

Comments

Blue Mountains National Park Favorites

Reviews and photos of Blue Mountains National Park favorites posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Blue Mountains National Park sightseeing.

View all Blue Mountains National Park hotels