Blue Mountains National Park Things to Do

  • Elysian Lookout and its strange rock formation
    Elysian Lookout and its strange rock...
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  • It's easy to understand why people go here
    It's easy to understand why people go...
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  • Elysian Lookout
    Elysian Lookout
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Most Recent Things to Do in Blue Mountains National Park

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    Scenic Skyway

    by cjg1 Updated Jun 23, 2011

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    Flying High...
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    The Scenic Skyway is an awesome way to see some of the Blue Mountains attractions. We boarded the skycab which took ups high above the Jamison Valley and 720 meters across. During our ride we saw the Three Sisters, Katoomba Falls, Mount Solitary and the never ending trees of the Jamison Valley.

    The ride was fairly smooth and it lasted about 15 minutes in duration. During the ride the Electro-Sceniglass floor opens to reveal a birds eye view of the Valley below. It's not for those who have a fear of heights but it is very cool to experience.

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    The Three Sisters

    by cjg1 Updated Jun 23, 2011

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    The Three Sisters
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    The Three Sisters are three large rock formations that are 922, 918 & 906 meters tall, 3000 feet above sea level. The Three Sisters are a major attraction in the Blue Mountains for visitors. Standing out on a platform looking at the Three Sisters was one of the moments in life when you really feel small when surrounded by such great natural beauty.

    The rock formations even have a legend:

    The Aboriginal dream time legend has it that three sisters, Meehni, Wimlah and Gunnedoo lived in the Jamison Valley as members of the Katoomba tribe.

    These beautiful young ladies had fallen in love with three brothers from the Nepean tribe, yet tribal law forbade them to marry.

    The brothers were not happy to accept this law and so decided to use force to capture the three sisters causing a major tribal battle.

    As the lives of the three sisters were seriously in danger, a witchdoctor from the Katoomba tribe took it upon himself to turn the three sisters into stone to protect them from any harm. While he had intended to reverse the spell when the battle was over, the witchdoctor himself was killed. As only he could reverse the spell to return the ladies to their former beauty, the sisters remain in their magnificent rock formation as a reminder of this battle for generations to come.

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    Scenic Railway

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Scenic Railway through the trees

    This is a way to get a thrill ride and views with a difference... Drop 415 metres through a cave and come out the other side the railway that is also known as "The Mountain Devil". It takes you to a great boardwalk walkway which allows you to wander amoungst the rainforest of the Blue Mountains a little below the canopy. This is the steepest railway in the world and great to take the kids or just experience as an adult for that matter.

    Built originally to transport coal skips up and down the mountain it started so far back as 1878, can you believe it??? It has grown from coal carts to passengers and been upgraded over the year from a rebuild in 1928 to electric in 1935, but you are still travelling down a little piece of history on the decent today. It now can carry up to 85 passengers, takes 7 minutes to travel those 415 metres at a speed of 4.0 metres per second at 52 degrees and a gradient of 206.5 metres.

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    Scenic Skyway

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View of falls from the cable car

    The Scenic Highway hovers 270 metres and travels 720 metres above the Jamison Valley of the Blue Mountains from Scenic World. It is a great way to explore the views of the Blue Mountains from above the tree tops. You will see Katoomba Falls, a haze of blue both sky and trees and some great views of the rocky cliffs for some photo oppotunities.

    Adult passes are $16AUD, $8 for kids and $40 for a family pass.

    Originally installed in 1958, now the new cable car which has operated since 2004 is set up to carry 84 passengers right in front of the Three Sisters and Echo Point.

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    The Three Sisters

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Three Sisters - Meehni, Wimlah & Gunnedoo

    Standing at 922, 918 & 906 metres tall , not only are these three amazing formations perched high above the Valley across from Echo Point above the Blue Mountains a beautiful photographical natural wonder that will simply awe you at their beauty, they are also the stuff that legends are made of.

    The Aboriginal dreamtime story of the sisters tells us that Meehni, Wimlah & Gunnedoo of the Katoomba tribe - the three sisters for which the amazing rock formations are named after - were set in stone to protect them from harm as they had fallen in love with three brothers from a Nepean tribe - and tribal laws forbade them to marry. The brothers were not happy to accept this law and legend tells that this caused quite a drama and tribal battles.

    The spell was intended to be reversed once the battle was over, however this did not work, so they are cast here in stone for eternity, there to share their beauty with us all.

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    Blue Lake

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Blue Lake near Jenolan Caves

    Located in the area surrounding Jenolan Caves Blue Lake is one of the spectacular sights you can see on the walks that surround the caves.

    What may surprise is that Blue Lake is indeed not natural and a man made feature of the mountains. It was constructed in 1908, principally to supply water to the Jenolan Hydroelectricity plant. The giveaway being the dam wall that you can view the Lake from the path that treads along. It is also home to Platypus.

    The Lake is quite spectacular taking on some of the amazing hues of blue from the mountains and its high mineral content forms an incredible blue green that adds to the blue mountains.

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    Carlottas Arch

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Carlotta's Arch

    Located near Jenolan caves the walk to Carlottas Arch starts opposite Caves House. As you reach the top wonderful views of the Blue Lake and Jenolan below can be viewed through this rock formation. The walk continues down through the Devil's Coach House and returns to Caves House via the Grand Arch.

    The Arch itself is testiment to the years of development of sedimentary strata in the region. The limestone structures in this area have developed over 430 million years from the very slow evaporation of water with dissolved calcium carbonate. This mineral, when deposited is called calcite, and in crystalline form makes up stalactites, stalagmites, shawls, straws and other beautiful features of the caves system that we enjoy as Jenolan Caves.

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    Echo Point

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011
    View from Echo Point

    The viewpoint for the spectacular scenery of the Blue Mountains finest Three Sisters, Echo Point offers not only views of those amazing rock sisters that are so well known but also a great gaze across the blue hue of the mountains Jamison Valley. At 170m high Echo point is the tourist hub of the Blue Mountains and is visited by over two million people every year. There are a number of lookouts for visitors to gaze from at this point. It also has a visitors centre all the souvenirs for people to take something quitessentially Aussie Blue Mountains style from the tacky to the terrific, teatowls, postcards, to teaspoons and so forth.

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    ZIG ZAG RAILWAY

    by balhannah Updated Feb 20, 2011

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    Steam train ride on a Wednesday
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    The Zig Zag Railway, built in the 1860's, is a full size, narrow gauge tourist railway located at Clarence.
    The line was constructed to transport people and produce from the western plains of NSW to Sydney. It was replaced in 1910 by a 10 tunnel deviation.
    The trains, track and rollingstock are maintained and operated by the Zig Zag Railway Co-op Ltd, a voluntary, “not for profit’ co-operative.

    On leaving the Station, you pass through quite a long tunnel, be aware that there is
    NO AIRCONDITIONING OR LIGHTS IN THE TRAIN, so it is pitch black, and if your window is down, then you may be covered in soot.

    The steam train descends the steep gradient from Clarence to Bottom Points, through historic tunnels and over sandstone viaducts, revealing the engineering brilliance of the Zig Zag.
    At each zig.....zag..... you are allowed to get off (12mins) and go for a stretch of the legs while the engine changes to the other end of the carriages.

    On reaching the bottom, a little more time is available. As it was lunch time, and there was a Cafe, a "Mrs. Mac's" pie was a must. A little more time was allowed here, enough to eat lunch and to visit the Toilet if necessary.

    The whole journey takes about 1.5 hours
    The Zig Zag Railway can be reached by road or by CityRail train.
    Zig Zag trains run every day of the year (except Christmas Day)

    Steam trains run on Weekends, Public Holidays, Wednesdays and NSW public school holidays

    It is advisable to arrive early as most of the Carriages are reserved for Tourist coaches. When finding a seat, sit on the side nearest the platform as this is the side with the BEST VIEWS.

    COST IN 2009 was $25 adults

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    SCENIC WORLD - SKYWAY

    by balhannah Updated Feb 14, 2011

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    The Skyway

    Scenic World is touristy, but I still think it is nice to do, it's the experience that its all about!

    I have done it a couple of times, once in the old cable car, and once in the new Skyway.

    This is only a short journey, but if you are scared of heights, then you may not like it, as high up you are, suspended in mid air over the top of the 270 metre deep valley, with great views to the valley floor, the Three Sisters, Katoomba Falls, Mount Solitary and the Jamison Valley.

    In the new one, the floor is glass, are you feeling squeemish just reading this? don't worry, it is extremely strong! ......and they DO NOT make you walk on it!....But I did!

    Scenic World is open every day from 9.00am to 5.00pm (last rides at 4.50pm)

    I did the combination ticket, it worked out the best value. It includes everything.
    PRICES IN 2010..... Adult $28.00
    Child (4-13) $14.00

    Skkyway on its own
    Adults....$16 Children $8

    Scenic World, on the corner of Violet Street and Cliff Drive, Katoomba, is only 3km from Katoomba's town centre and railway station.

    From Katoomba you can hop on a Blue Mountains Explorer or Trolley Tours bus that will drop you off right at the front door.

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    Echo Point

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    The beautiful Jamison Valley
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    Echo Point is one of the highlight attractions in the Blue Mountains. From here there is a perfect view of the Three Sisters and the Jamison Valley. We began our visit here with the beautiful views of the rock formations and valley below.

    There is also a Visitor's Center here with brochures, guides, maps, food options, souvenirs and even a wine shop (wine tastings for free).

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    The Thousand Steps

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    The Thousand Steps is the large incline that starts at the botom of the Jamison Valley and takes you back up to the point. We decided to not do that since personally I was tired, Liz was cold and the rain was going at a steady fall at this point.

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    Wentworth Falls

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    Wentworth Falls is a three tiered seasonal waterfall in the Blue Mountains. The waterfalls are fed by the Kedumba Creek. Depending on the rainfall of the season the falls can either be a small trickle of water or a large gushing flow of water. The day we visited the falls were not gushing but it was far from a trickle.

    You can access the falls by walking the pass or passing overhead via the Scenic Skyway. Not far from the falls they discovered rock carvings that are believed to be the first signs of human habitation in the area.

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    Grand Canyon part two

    by iandsmith Written Oct 24, 2010

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    Dripping veils
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    Veils of droplets descend in delicate crystal showers from fern roots desperately clinging to niches in the sheer sandstone walls. The blipping sound of the water into the pools beneath is interspersed by the gleeful croaks of frogs happy to see the water once again returning more regularly to the ponds they call home. Lichen clings to other sites and fungi occasionally makes an appearance on some long ago fallen tree.
    A massive log jam on one side is a reminder of what force nature can unleash when unrestrained yet the soft moss carpeting the rocks seems to belie any such maelstrom. Here and there the brightness of the sky penetrates this eerie world, lighting walls that man has ne’r touched and dancing on the ripples below the numerous cascades.
    Amazingly, probably only 1-2 kilometres away, as per the flying crow, Katoomba Airport is located yet down here it might as well be on another planet. The only flying thing you can hear is the occasional bird call bouncing around the sandstone walls.
    Too soon my time is up and I turn around and head back, retracing my steps all the way to the motorhome with one or two stops on the way out. It’s not until I’m almost at the carpark again that the first of the weekend bushwalkers put in an appearance. I’m grateful to have had the 2 ½ hours down there to myself and vow to repeat the dose some time in the future.

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    Grand Canyon

    by iandsmith Updated Oct 24, 2010

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    Deep in the canyon
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    I hit the trail well before 7 a.m. The wind was brisk and the red sunrise foretold of a day that was not going to be totally benign. A quick glance at the view across Grose Valley from Evans Lookout into the mist tinged floor and I began the descent, initially on the old stone stairs and then on the new, solid, almost shiny, rock stepping stones whose absence had caused the trail to be closed for months.
    I moved through the wildflowers, predominantly yellow, purple and white, and the matchstick straight eucalypts and coachwood that were such a contrast to their bent and gaunt counterparts atop the wind ravaged plateau. Water was trickling through the small gully beside the track, gurgling with delight that the remnants of yesterday’s violent storm had given it life. The greater the number of steps the more the chasm narrowed; ferns became a dominant vegetation in this world where light has but a fleeting presence.
    After half an hour I came to the intersection where you can go straight ahead to Beauchamp Falls or right to the Grand Canyon and Neates Glen. The former option was closed so it wasn’t really an option at all.
    It’s also where two streams meet. Stepping across the stony creek bed I picked up the track again and pushed on into the surreal world of the Blue Mountains canyons.
    I push on until I come to the turn off to the left indicating the Grand Canyon walk but ahead of me there’s another. I decide to take it.

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Blue Mountains National Park Things to Do

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