Coffs Harbour Things to Do

  • Looking to Coffs Harbour
    Looking to Coffs Harbour
    by iandsmith
  • It's really upright
    It's really upright
    by iandsmith
  • Bucca Creek beside Swans Road
    Bucca Creek beside Swans Road
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Things to Do in Coffs Harbour

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    BONVILLE HEADLAND - SAWTELL

    by balhannah Updated Nov 19, 2013
    Bonville Headland
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    Sawtell is located approx. 11kms from Coffs Harbour. It is worth the short drive as this area is quite pretty. I really enjoy it here, especially the coastline.

    We went to the Bonville Headland, which is the start or finish of the Solitary Islands Coastal walk. This is a 60km coastal walk to our next destination of Red Rock.
    It can be made as short or as long as you wish
    See website below for details on the walk.

    It was a pity it wasn't the best of days, a storm was brewing and drowned me before I finished my walk! The sea was rough and the wind was strong, so do be careful around here. There was a headstone in memory of a person who lost their life here.
    Here, the coast has lots of interesting cliffs and rock formations, and a sea swimming pool. There is plenty of free car parking and Toilets with a lovely seascape Mural.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing
    • Beaches

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    "FISH WATCHING"

    by balhannah Updated Nov 17, 2013

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    The boardwalk
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    Make your way to the Coffs Harbour Marina & Jetty, and walk along the boardwalks over the sea. The water is very clear, and here you will see lots of different fish. If you have some bread crumbs, then, you will have a lot more fish to admire.
    Entertaining for children and Adults, and its FREE!

    Update Nov 2013.... Came loaded with bread to feed the fish and there were hardly any, just a few small ones. A Taiwan tourist was happy though, so I gave her the remainder of the bread to have fun with!

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    • Family Travel
    • Beaches
    • School Holidays

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    Korora Lookout

    by iandsmith Written Nov 17, 2013
    Looking over the banana plantations
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    This is a half hour return walk, The entry point is just a couple of hundred metres short of the ever popular Sealy Lookout and offer expansive views over the north coastline that aren't visible from Sealy.
    They've recently installed a comfortable seat and benches up there so you can relax for a while.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Bruxner Park

    by iandsmith Updated Sep 9, 2013
    My motorhome at Sealy Lookout
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    Things to see and do
    •Bushwalking: The Rainforest Walk (1.6km/45min loop) and Creek Trail (20min one way) are two easy walking trails that join at Halfway Creek picnic area. The Rainforest Walk, with interpretive signs along the trail, starts at The Gap while the Creek Walk follows Bucca Bucca Creek to Swans Road. Pick up a map from the Coffs Coast Visitor Information Centre or Forests NSW.
    •Picnic & barbecue: Pause for a picnic or barbecue at Sealy Lookout, Halfway Creek or Swans Road Crossing.
    •Forest drive: Take a self-guided tour through the Flora Reserve along Bruxner Park Road. Pause to marvel at the Vincent Tree, a 65m high Flooded Gum close to the road and an example of the majestic vegetation found in the reserve.
    •Lookout points: Admire the sweeping panoramas north and south along the coast and out to sea from lookout points at Sealy Lookout and Korora Lookout.
    •Bird watching: The rainforest is a food source for bowerbirds, cuckoos, fruit bats and fruit pigeons, while boobook owls make their nests in the hollows of large eucalypts. Listen for the distinctive calls of other rainforest birds including the catbird and the whip bird.
    Enquiries
    For further information about Bruxner Park Flora Reserve and Sealy Lookout, contact Forests NSW on (02) 6652 0111 or visit the State Forest information page. Alternatively you can contact the Coffs Coast National Parks and Wildlife Service on (02) 6652 0900 or visit the National Park information page.

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    The Vincent Tree

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 27, 2013
    The Vincent Tree
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    Once you've had a look from the lookout, it pays to head further into the forest by returning to the main road and turning left. This will take you to the Vincent Tree, named after a Minister for Forests in the first half of the 20th century.
    The tree is an impressive Eucalyptus Grandisi (Flooded Gum), last measured at 215 ft high and 23ft in girth. Well, it used to be. These days it is but a sad remnant. The crown and all bar one of its branches has collapsed and are now rotting beside it.
    However, across the road and also a little further up there are two fig trees whose vines make an impressive display as you can clearly see in the pictures.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
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    Bruxner Park

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 27, 2013
    Vegetation of the reserve
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    Bruxner Park Flora Reserve, managed by Forests NSW, consists of 407ha of dense rainforest and eucalypt forest in Orara East State Forest. Just a 10-minute drive west of the city of Coffs Harbour, Bruxner Park is one of Coffs Coast’s most accessible and popular reserves.
    Thanks to its proximity to urban areas and its range of walking trails, scenic lookout points, picnic shelters and barbecue facilities, the park attracts around 200,000 people per year.
    You can drive up to The Gap through banana plantations and avocado groves, park the car and start one of several walking trails. Drive 2km further to Sealy Lookout where more parking, barbecues, picnic shelters and toilets are provided.
    At an elevation of 310m, Sealy Lookout provides excellent views over Coffs Harbour and south along the coastline. The Bruxner Park area was the scene of regular logging operations from the 1880s until 1914 when the British Australian Timber (BAT) Company’s sawmill at the Coffs Harbour Jetty burnt down. A logging tramline wound its way down from just past The Gap in Bruxner Park to the Jetty, along the route that is now Bruxner Park Road, the access road to the reserve.
    In 1933, the Minister for Forests and local Member, the Hon. Roy Vincent MLA, was sympathetic to local voices wishing to preserve the luxuriant forest types of the area and exclude it from future logging. He directed that a reserve should be established and named ‘Bruxner Park’ after Lt. Col. The Hon. M.F. Bruxner MLA, then Deputy Premier of NSW. Due to procedural delays and then the war, the declaration of the Flora Reserve wasn’t actually officially finalised until 1958.
    In 1961, the Hon. R.S. Vincent himself was honoured for his role in creating the reserve, when a large Flooded Gum along Bruxner Park Road was named after him. At a height of 65m and a diameter at breast height of 2.27m, the “Vincent Tree” is one of the biggest trees in New South Wales. Now you can read "WAS" because the top half has collapsed, along with all the branches bar one. Must have made a racket when it fell.
    In 1970, H.M. Queen Elizabeth II and members of the Royal Family visited the Flora Reserve and Sealy Lookout as part of the Bicentenary Celebrations’ Royal Visit to Australia.
    Bruxner Park was declared a Flora Reserve because of its abundance of contrasting forest types and to permanently conserve its flora and fauna. The park’s vegetation ranges from the flooded gum, blackbutt, blue gum, tallowwood, forest oak and turpentine of the eucalypt forest, to the booyong, yellow carabeen, crabapple, birds-nests, elk-horns and vines of the rainforest.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Coffs Creek walk

    by iandsmith Updated Sep 20, 2012
    View from the boardwalk

    Adjacent to the Botanic Gardens is the Coffs Creek walk. It follows the tidal mangrove-lined creek and has boardwalk over the tricky bits.
    Here you may learn to understand a little bit just how important these habitats are to the overall picture of life and how, without them, we basically would have little marine life.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Birdwatching

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    Park Beach

    by iandsmith Written Sep 15, 2012
    Looking north to the headland
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    Park Beach is the most common beach people head to when visiting because it's just north of the harbour itself and, with accommodation adjacent, is popular with tourists.
    These pictures were taken at the northern end where there's a carpark and a walk over the headland that takes you to Diggers Beach, more popular with surfers.

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    Sapphire Beach

    by iandsmith Updated Sep 8, 2012
    Beautiful colours of the water
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    Sapphire is just one of many beaches north of Coffs that have lovely names but are only good for a beach walk because the surf is not user friendly due to the steep dropoffs.
    Some of this is due to the offshore Solitary Islands that have a significant effect on the underlying structure of the beach.
    I walked the whole beach on a balmy day with my partner Lorraine and we had a cuppa at the park at Sapphire, a great place for families as evidenced by the number of mums with young children there.
    If you want to do the walk as we did, allow about 2 hours and remember the sand isn't easy; it's invariably soft and will give your legs a workout.

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    Charlesworth Bay

    by iandsmith Written Sep 5, 2012
    Charlesworth Bay
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    This is a secluded bay not that far from Coffs at all. It can be accessed from Diggers Beach by a walk over the headland or from Kororo Bay where there's a carpark at one end.
    It's not a place for surf and is generally protected from the swells unless there's a cylcone up north and the surf pushes down.
    As a place to walk and relax it takes some beating as hopefully these pictures indicate.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Beaches

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    Whale watching

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 16, 2012

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    Whale that passed close by while fishing

    You can whale watch at the end of Mutton Bird Island but it's certainly not the best place on the coast to do that. You can also jump on the local whale watching boat (try finding a port on the N.S.W. coast now that doesn't have one) which is an option with a much greater degree of certainty than standing on the shore and certainly means you'll get a much closer view.
    This particular shot was taken while I was fishing just north of Coffs Harbour. Apparently many come through here to scrape the barnacles off on the rocky sea bed that's here.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Fishing
    • Whale Watching

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    Butterflies aren't free

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 16, 2012
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    No indeed, they can cost up to $16 per person when I visited the Butterfly House just south of Coffs but, they have set it out well. I should warn all potential visitors that very warm and humid are the conditions you will encounter inside because that's what butterflies like.
    There's also a maze here, some lovely artifacts, particularly woodturning and light lunches and refreshments are available.
    It's great also if you're into photography of insects because it's easy to get up close and personal inside the house.
    It's open 9-4 except on Mondays when school is in.

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    • Family Travel
    • Photography
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    Mutton Bird Island

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 16, 2012

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    On a clear day
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    It's only a little island but its popularity far outweighs its size.
    Something to do with position. Something to do with being at the end of the marina.
    On a day like this, when you can see forever, it's almost enchanting. The short walk takes you to the other side and is very popular with tourists but, birds nest here at certain times of the year and you may not be able to walk there on those occasions.

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    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

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    Banana Madness - Would Annathrax love it?

    by aussiedoug Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Tallowood Stump at the Big Banana

    THE BIG BANANA

    Still not 100% sure if this is a must see or tourist trap! But my kids liked it & we had some fun on the toboggan ride. In fact we had fun on it a couple of times.

    If you want to know about the growing a harvesting of bananas then you can take a walking tour that shows you all the stages through to packaging.

    The photo with this tip shows my girls near a really big Tallowood stump, not far away from the actual Big Banana itself. Goodness knows how old this tree must have been when it was cut down. What a shame!
    There are other tours you can do & attractions to visit if you have the time. We wanted to do the Hillclimb train & railway ride to the top, but got there just a bit late after our toboggan rides. If only we'd done it the other way around.

    There's an indoor snow slope, but I personally wouldn't waste my time or money on it as we've tried that before at Mt Thebarton in Adelaide & it was like trying to ski on ice, not snow.

    If you have kids from little ones to big ones it's worth a visit, but it'll cost you depending on what activities/attractions you visit/participate in.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

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  • Walks in Coffs Harbour, then lunch with a view

    by contentwriter Written Feb 6, 2009

    There are various nice walks you can do right in or not far from Coffs Harbour on the NSW North Coast. And many of those walks end near a restaurant where you can plonk down for a cool drink, coffee & cake or lunch.

    The Coffs Creek Walk is one very nice walk, right in the centre of town but hidden from view by all those trees. It's really a bushwalk linking the CBD to the harbour, following the creek.

    A walk up Muttonbird Island is always very rewarding with many opportunities for an ice cream or drink at the marina or around the foreshores afterwards.

    Have a look at http://www.thingstodoincoffsharbour.com.au for more ideas for things to do in and around Coffs Harbour.

    Many of the suggested activities are outdoors and many are free.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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