Dungog Travel Guide

  • Bank Hotel
    Bank Hotel
    by balhannah
  • Historic home @ Dungog
    Historic home @ Dungog
    by balhannah
  • Coolalie
    Coolalie
    by balhannah

Dungog Things to Do

  • balhannah's Profile Photo
    Coolalie

    by balhannah Updated Jan 24, 2012

    The main street of Dungog is named after Chief Justice James D. Dowling (an early landholder in the district).
    You will not only find historic home's, but as you walk further along the street, you will come across many old shops and facades, many dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    One historic home I particularly liked, was Coolalie (1895), a beautiful two-storey brick building with cast-iron lacework on the eaves.
    I believe it has ornate ceilings, cedar joinery and staircase, marble fireplaces inside, anbd outside is a lovely garden.

    Perhap's it opens on special day's, I am not sure!

    On the corner of Dowling and Brown Street's, you will find the Tourist Information Centre
    Telephone: (02) 4992 2212

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo
    Bank Hotel 1 more image

    by balhannah Written Jan 24, 2012

    Lacework is something you will find on the historic building's in this area.

    The former CBC Bank (1874), which is now the National Australia Bank, is a beautiful two-storey building, with a lovely iron gate.
    Inside, are cedar doors and fittings. The upstairs balcony with cast-iron lacework on the columns and eaves is what I really love!

    Another building with Lace work, is the Bank Hotel. Like lot's of Hotel's in this era, the verandah's were always trimmed with lace work. It's and attractive building with a lovely upstairs balcony, cast-iron fencing, and decorative columns.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo
    Off! on the Pedalfest in Dungog main street

    by balhannah Updated Mar 2, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dungog Pedalfest is an annual event HELD every year in September.

    Pedalfest is a weekend gathering for cyclists to enjoy safe pedalling on scenic country roads, There are rides suitable for children and rides that might stretch the muscles of the fittest and keenest of adults.

    Different rides are conducted over three days, scenic ones to Chichester Dam, ones that use the brains as well, and another for children, plus some others.

    FREE MUFFINS ARE ENJOYED BY ALL!

    All over the weekend, various events and entertainments happen, like Fetes, Art shows, Bush dances, live muscians, Bush Poets, Sausage sizzles and more throughout the Pedalfest.

    If you are interesting in joining the cyclists next year, the website below gives the necessary details on entry fees, entertainment and more

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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Dungog Favorites

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    Rainforest at Barrington Tops

    by iandsmith Written Aug 1, 2010

    Favorite thing: European settlement in all Planning Districts of the Dungog Shire was based on the movement of settlers further from the coast and the availability of land for agriculture. Continuing settlement resulted in the principal Shire towns being established along the Williams and Paterson Rivers in the early 1800's.
    Terms of land tenure in the early days were vague. The land was not surveyed when initially settled and settlers did not know their exact boundaries when official surveying took place.
    The Hunter Valley was closed to free settlement until 1825 because of its proximity to the penal colony at Newcastle. In 1823, the prisoners were transferred to Port Macquarie, and by 1825 exploration had shown that the Hunter Valley was not as accessible as first thought.The Williams Valley was opened up in 1825 by Governor Darling, with land granted according to settlers means, ability to carry out improvements and willingness to take assigned convicts. Free grants of land ranging from 329 and 2560 acres were made from 1823, or up to 9600 acres could be purchased outright.
    The first land portions in the Shire were surveyed on the basis of a line extending due north from Maitland. Early grantees were military or naval officers or free immigrants. Most grants were of flat and undulating land, with vegetation consisting of open forest and grassy woodland. Mountains and hills were generally reserved as Crown Land, and these areas were for the most part not populated until after 1861, when the NSW Land Act made it possible to select portions of between 40 and 320 acres. Prior to this Crown Land could be leased.

    Fondest memory: Dungog is situated on the northern side of the Hunter Valley. What this means is that it gets significantly more rainfall than anywhere else in the Hunter; around 50% more than the southern side for instance.
    Thus you have fertile soil and reliable water which leads to lush pastureland or, in its original state, rainforest; something I have enjoyed many times during my life.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

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