Goulburn Things to Do

  • The Caroline Chisholm Mosaic
    The Caroline Chisholm Mosaic
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  • Jewish Cemetery - Headstone in Hebrew and English
    Jewish Cemetery - Headstone in Hebrew...
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  • Temperance Fountain
    Temperance Fountain
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Most Recent Things to Do in Goulburn

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    Now for something completely different

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 17, 2014

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    Amazing contrast

    Graveyards are often interesting places. However, when they are backed by tin sheds with grandiose artwork, it makes them even more interesting.
    When arriving from the north (Sydney) this building is clearly visible on the western side of the main road.
    The graveyard has many memories of historical people, but to get some really meaningful history you have to go to St. Saviours Cemetery where possibly numbered among the interred is Hovell, of Hume and Hovell fame, one of Australia's most famous exploring teams in the early 1800's. There is some doubt about this as he may still be in a Sydney site.
    The Hume and Hovell expedition was one of the most important journeys of explorations undertaken in eastern Australia. In 1824 the Governor of New South Wales, Sir Thomas Brisbane, commissioned Hamilton Hume and former Royal Navy Captain William Hovell to lead an expedition to find new grazing land in the south of the colony, and also to find an answer to the mystery of where New South Wales's western rivers flowed.
    The party set out from Appin, near Sydney, in October 1824 and travelled south to the Murrumbidgee River near the site of Tumut. They crossed "a noble stream" which they named the Hume (now the Murray River) near the site of Albury, and then advanced into what is now Victoria.
    They proceeded south crossing the Ovens River and Goulbourn River by a route further to the east of the Hume Highway and closer to the foothills of Mount Buffalo. They reached the Great Dividing range in rugged country around Mount Disappointment by following an aboriginal track roughly along the Yea to Kinglake road. They were disturbed by aboriginal burning off and were unable to find a way through the range. They then retraced their steps to what is now the Straths Creek road at Flowerdale then moved west along Sunday Creek to Mount Piper near Broadford.
    (continued)

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    Mortis Street Pioneer Cemetery

    by wabat Written Feb 16, 2014
    Mortis Street Pioneer Cemetery
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    The was the first Goulburn General Cemetery (Roman Catholics, Presbyterians and Methodists could use it) and was established in the late 1830s slightly later than the Anglican Cemetery of St Saviour’s located less then a kilometre from here at the other end of Cemetery Road. The Cemetery was officially closed for burials when the new and current Goulburn General Cemetery was opened in 1904 though family members continued to be buried here in family plots until around 1954.

    Please be aware that may hear it referred to by the title of this tip, the old cemetery, Mortis St Cemetery or the Pioneer Cemetery.

    Based on headstones the earliest recorded burial was that of Alexander Fraser on 2 September 1839 while the oldest person recorded as buried here was Duncan McDonell on 21 September 1861 aged 101.

    Among those buried here are five members (there are only three headstones) of the Durack family. The Durack family migrated (post Irish Famine) from Ireland in the early 1850s and were pioneers in the true sense of the word. The extended family spread out all over Australia from its original base here in Goulburn and engaged in gold mining in the Kimberley’s (North West Australia) and all aspects of agriculture throughout the country. At its height, the family ran a string of cattle stations with a total land area roughly the size of Belgium.

    I have so far concentrated on death, graves and headstones and given that I am writing about a cemetery I imagine this would be what you would expect me to write about.

    But, dear reader, when you visit this cemetery the first thing you notice is not death or graves or headstones but rather the artwork covering the full wall of an engineering workshop which abuts the cemetery.

    My initial thoughts were that graffiti artists had been at play but on researching the matter I have ascertained that what you see is indeed a piece of commissioned artwork entitled, rather unoriginally, “The Big Picture” and painted by Braidwood (local) artist Fran Ilfould in 1999.

    If it were located somewhere else I am not so sure that I would like it but, in its present location, I love it – unusual adornment for a cemetery though it is.

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    St Saviour’s Cemetery

    by wabat Written Feb 15, 2014
    St Saviour's Cemetery
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    While there are a number of graves in the grounds of St Saviour’s Cathedral (mainly bishops, deans and other church officials) the cathedral's best known though now closed cemetery is located at Cemetery Road on the Sydney side of the City.

    While the crown grant designating this plot as a burial ground was not received until 1842 burials certainly took place here well before this date. The earliest legible date on a headstone is on that belonging to John Weakley and reads 14 July 1831 or 1834. The cemetery was officially closed for burials in 1937 but again there were internments much later than this – for example Violet Hutchinson who died in 1957.

    These earlier and later internments explain the dates 1830 to 1957 shown on the cemetery gates notwithstanding that the cemetery was only officially open from 1842 to 1937.

    The most famous internment is that of Captain William Hovell who died in Sydney on 9 November 1875 aged 90. Based on the legible headstones, Mary Kremer was the oldest person to be buried in this cemetery in 1941 at the age of 99. Alas, not everyone made it to this grand age as evidenced by the graves of a number of children including the one in picture five attached.

    Returning to Captain Hovell, research suggests that while his name is on the headstone he may not actually be buried here. Apparently there is no evidence to support a move of his body from Sydney. I wonder of this also applies to his wife who’s name is lost on the headstone.

    Hovell was an English born sailor, explorer and settler. In his early career he was engaged in sea trade with South America and New Zealand but from an Australian perspective he is best known for his association with Hamilton Hume and exploratory trips into the interior of Australia. Hume and Hovell’s most famous trip, in the 1820s, was from Lake George in New South Wales to Port Phillip (near Geelong) on the south coast of Victoria. During this trip they encountered the Australian Alps, Mt Buffalo and the upper reaches of the Murray River.

    Sadly, in later life the two men, never the best of friends, had a falling out and now the local man, Hume, is the better known/remembered of the two, perhaps due to the Hume Highway which today connects Sydney with Melbourne via Albury being named after him.

    Notwithstanding the backdrop of Goulburn’s maximum security prison (you can see the exterior wall in picture four) the cemetery is a pleasant place to explore and is nicely positioned on a ridge above the confluence of the Wollondilly and Mulwaree Rivers affording the visitor (at least the living ones) great views across the valley. I also like the solitary yew tree which stands just inside the gate.

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    St Saviour’s Cathedral (Exterior)

    by wabat Updated Feb 15, 2014
    St Saviour's Cathedral
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    I have prepared two separate tips to comment on the interior of the cathedral – St Saviour’s Cathedral - Interior 1 and Interior 2. This tip covers the construction of, and the exterior of, the cathedral

    This is one of the, if not the, most beautiful Gothic Revival churches in Australia. It is the Cathedral Church of the Anglican Diocese of Canberra and Goulburn and named after Jesus, in his role as Saviour. It may come as a surprise to some readers that the Anglican Cathedral and Bishop for Canberra (Australia's capital city) are located in this city of around only 20,000 people nearly 100 kilometres from the capital.

    Queen Victoria, via Letters Patent, established the then Goulburn Diocese in 1863 and Mesac Thomas became the first bishop of an area that covered most of New South Wales outside Sydney and Newcastle. As the seat of a Bishop, the town of Goulburn also then became a city - Australia's First Inland City (a nomenclature it still wears with pride). Canberra and the Australia Capital Territory had not been thought of in 1863. When Canberra celebrated its centenary in 2013, Goulburn celebrated the 150th anniversary of its proclamation by Queen Victoria.

    When Bishop Thomas took his seat (as bishops do) the current cathedral didn’t exist, It took 20 years (completed in 1884) for local craftsmen, using local material including bricks from the former 1839 Church for the cathedral floor to construct, from white Bundanoon sandstone, St Saviour’s to the design of colonial ecclesiastical architect Edmund Blacket. That said, certain aspects of Blacket design (including the tower) were added much later. While the cathedral was being built a smaller pro-cathedral and Sunday school was constructed for on going worship. These still stand within the cathedral precinct, to the west of the cathedral itself.

    Numerous plans were made to add the tower and spire as envisaged by Blacket's design but they all failed. It was not until 1984 and a grant of $1 million from the Australian Bicentennial commemorative program that serious effort was finally put into adding a tower and spire. While the existing tower was constructed in 1988/89, again by local stonemasons using local materials, a spire was not added due to concerns over inadequacy of the ground to support a tower, spire and bells.

    St Saviour's has twelve main bells. Eight of these (dedicated by the Archbishop of Canterbury) were sourced from St Mark's Church in Leicester, England and were named after the ships of the First Fleet. In increasing order of size, they are: Supply, Friendship, Lady Penrhyn, Prince of Wales, Charlotte, Scarborough, Alexander and the Tenor bell Sirius, which is the largest bell at just over a tonne. There were installed in the new tower in 1988.

    In 1993 two more bells, Golden Grove and Fishburn were added with the last two, Endeavour and Borrowdale, added in May 2005.

    For those who know what it means, and I don’t, St Saviours, Goulburn has the only 12 bell and flat 6th country peal in the Southern Hemisphere.

    The Service Bell (an additional bell along the flat 6th referred to above) is named Mesac, after the first bishop and is the original bell from St Saviour's 1839 Church. This bell was created at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, in London (a place high on my list of must visits when I next visit London).

    Have a walk around the cathedral. The on-site cemetery contains the remains of less than fifty people including the first and second Bishops of Goulburn. The grave on the left in picture four attached is that of the first Bishop of Goulburn (Mesac Thomas). St Saviour’s main cemetery is located on the outskirts of the city and is the subject of a separate tip.

    My last picture is an autographed picture of Bishop Thomas (first Bishop of Goulburn) which hangs in the cathedral. You may not be able to make out from the photo that the Bishop’s signature reads “M Goulburn”. Bishops traditionally sign using their first name and that of their diocese.

    While you can have a look at the exterior of the cathedral at any time it makes sense to view the interior and exterior on the same visit.

    Cathedral Opening Hours

    Daily 10 am and 4 pm - outside services. Guides are available (donation appreciated) you are welcome to self guide yourself and will be provided with an infomation sheet for this purpose. Bell Tower Tours are held at 10.30am & 2.30pm on the 1st Saturday of each month.

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    St Saviour’s Cathedral - Interior 1

    by wabat Updated Feb 15, 2014
    St Saviour's Cathedral Interior
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    Prior to reading this tip (and (St Saviour’s Cathedral- Interior 2) you should read my tip St Saviour’s Cathedral (Exterior) which, in addition to telling you a little of about the building itself, provides some historical context which you may find useful for this tip.

    Internally the cathedral is on a fairly grand scale. Cruciform in plan, it has a central nave, side aisles, chancel and transepts and as with the exterior, it exhibits some of architect Edmund Blacket’s finest work.

    As with many churches of this era the first thing to attract most people will be the stain glass windows. The cathedral has a number of quite stunning massive stain glass windows which, in addition to the glass, exhibit elaborate stone tracery (the concrete that holds the stain glass in). The Great East window above the intricately carved altar (picture two) with it amazing carving of the Last Supper by W P McIntosh is especially beautiful. This window was built by Heaton, Butler and Bayne, of London in 1885 in early sixteenth century Flemish style such as can be seen in King's College Chapel, Cambridge if that is closer for you to visit!

    Alas, the number of pictures I can add to a tip precludes me from including more window pictures and also from showing you the intricate woodwork on the roof interior, though you can get a glimpse of the latter from my main picture if you look carefully.

    While admiring the windows, look up into the west balcony (Ascension Chapel). You could be forgiven for thinking that you are looking at another window. You are indeed looking at the Rose Window but it is, in fact, a quilted “window” produced by local quilters (picture three). In addition to admiring the quality of the rose itself do note the quilted brickwork which makes it blend into the surrounding wall further adding to the illusion of this being a real window.

    The quilted window is not the only softer and warmth inducing touch in St Saviour’s and for many years local women have been active embroiders for the cathedral. Do have a look at the beautiful hand made prayer kneeling pads, all different, to see some of their work (picture four).

    Mentioning things personal, perhaps the most personal thing in the cathedral and one very easily missed is the crucifix hanging above the pulpit (picture five). This crucifix was hand carved by Edmund Blacket in 1842 and later donated to the cathedral. As crucifixes tend to be more closely associated with Roman Catholicism or very High Anglican Church its initial display was contested and it lay in storage for many years before being finally displayed in the cathedral. This, I imagine, must have caused more than a tad of embarrassment given Blacket’s intimate involvement in the construction of the cathedral.

    The cathedral again hosted a bit of controversy in 2012 when Genieve Blackwell became the first female to be concentrated as an Anglican Bishop in the State of New South Wales. The consecration of Bishop Blackwell was performed here in St Saviour’s by the current Bishop of Canberra and Goulburn, Bishop Robinson, in the absence of the Archbishop of Sydney who was unable to officiate “for reasons of conscience.” Bishops are normally consecrated by Archbishops.

    For more details on the Interior of St Saviour’s see my next second tip - St Saviour’s Cathedral - Interior 2.

    Cathedral Opening Hours

    Daily 10 am and 4 pm - outside services. Guides are available (donation appreciated) but you are welcome to self guide yourself and will be provided with an information sheet for this purpose. Bell Tower Tours are held at 10.30am & 2.30pm on the 1st Saturday of each month.

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    St Saviour’s Cathedral - Interior 2

    by wabat Updated Feb 15, 2014
    St Saviour's Cathedral - Organ Pipes
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    If you came upon this tip directly do have a look at my first tip on the interior of St Saviour’s and my tip on the exterior/history of the cathedral as they will provide context for this tip which continues from my first interior tip.

    The cathedral’s furnishings, many designed by the cathedral architect Edmund Blacket are certainly worthy close inspection. Most notable of these furnishing from my perspective are mentioned below.

    The organ, dating back to 1884 and manufactured by Foster and Andrews, Hull, England is especially nice and not least so for the very ornate pipes an example of which you can see in my main picture attached. The organ, which cost around GBP 1340, was originally located in the west Gallery but was moved to its present location in 1902.

    The oak Bishop's throne (picture two) is one of the most elaborate pieces of Australian Victorian architecture still existing today – you really do need to get up close to see how detailed and fine the carving is on this.

    This fine carving is carried though to the oak altar (have a look at picture two on my first St Saviour’s Interior tip and to the Gothic inspired canopy on the baptismal font (picture three). The canopy, a later addition to the original font, is made of Queensland maple and was made by Sydney woodcarver Frederick Tod.

    The baptismal font and pulpit (picture four) were carved by John Roddis of Birmingham, England. They are both of white Caen stone, from the same quarries used for the great French and English cathedrals. While there are a number of stone carvings on the font, one to look out for is that depicting the baptism of Jesus in the river Jordan by John the Baptist.

    Continuing the stonework theme and rounding out this tip (though there are many other things of interest to explore and admire within the cathedral) I ask you to look upward and you will see a series of circular stone medallions/carvings running around the nave of the cathedral. See the first picture in my St Saviour’s Cathedral - Interior 1 tip for an overview and picture five attached here for a more detailed look at one of the medallions.

    There are fourteen of these medallions depicting the life of Jesus. This 1883 work was the first professional commission for William Priestly MacIntosh, who had trained as a stone carver in Edinburgh before migrating to Australia and studying under Lucien Henry at the Sydney Mechanics School of Arts in Sydney.

    Cathedral Opening Hours

    Daily 10 am and 4 pm - outside services. Guides are available (donation appreciated) but you are welcome to self guide yourself and will be provided with an information sheet for this purpose. Bell Tower Tours are held at 10.30am & 2.30pm on the 1st Saturday of each month.

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    The Masonic Temple

    by wabat Written Feb 14, 2014

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    Goulburn Masonic Temple

    Even were it not for the fact that this renaissance/classical style building is called “The Masonic Temple”, the iconic compass and square symbol atop the building immediately gives it away as a Masonic/ Freemason building.

    What intrigued me rather more about it was the two dates displayed there-on 1928 and 1890. For an organisation full of symbolism and, some would say, shrouded in mystery and secrecy I wondered what deep meaning might lie behind the display of two dates – and also, if you notice in the picture, why they read backwards looking at the building.

    Had there just been one date I would have assumed that it was the date the building was constructed or opened.

    In researching this tip I found the reason for the two dates to be rather simple and, disappointingly for me, certainly lacking in any mystery. A single story temple was constructed on this site in 1890. In 1928 a second story was added. Why they didn’t display 1890 on the left hand side of the name and 1928 on the right hand side eludes me – perhaps there-in lies a mystery for someone else to solve!

    Now that the date mystery has been more or less resolved I can enlighten you further on the building itself.

    The original 1890 building and the 1928 extension were both designed by architect, E.C Manfred. Manfred was a prolific designer of buildings in the late 1800s and early 1900s in Goulburn, a dozen or so of which still remain, including this temple. He even designed the bandstand in Belmore Park.

    The addition of the second story was delayed while plans were adjusted to raise the ceiling about 1 metre to accommodate a pipe organ built by S.W. Leggo, of Manly (Sydney). The organ, still in operation today, cost GBP1000 and was donated by W.J. Bartlett the founder of the Goulburn Brewery which is, incidentally, also still in operation (the brewery that is and not, alas, Mr Bartlett).

    The 1928 extension was officially opened by His Excellency, the Governor General, Lord Stonehaven, as Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge in NSW on 27 March, 1929.

    I imagine many readers will already be aware of, and have well developed views on, Freemasons. This is not the place to espouse my views or elicit debate. I will however include a little background on Freemasonry for the benefit of those who may not be familiar with the concept. There are few organisations in the world that have had more written about them and which elicit more debate than the Freemasons so an interested reader will have no problems exploring further.

    Freemasonry (now a world wide movement) traces its origins to groups of stonemasons, builders and tradesmen in the Middle Ages who got together in Britain to regulate the qualifications of masons and their interaction with authorities and clients – akin to craft guilds and perhaps the forerunners of today’s professional organisations or indeed unions (that last bit might be seen as contentious!).

    For the position and role of Freemasons today I will leave you with some information from the website of the Masonic Higher Education Bursary Fund (instituted by the Grand Lodge of Alberta, Canada).

    Freemasonry is one of the world’s oldest secular fraternal societies. Freemasonry instills in its members a moral and ethical approach to life: it seeks to reinforce thoughtfulness for others, kindness in the community, honesty in business, courtesy in society and fairness in all things. Members are urged to regard the interests of the family as paramount but, importantly, Freemasonry also teaches and practices concern for people, care for the less fortunate and help for those in need. In essence it is a beautiful system of morality, veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols.

    Freemasonry is:

    Kindness in the home -
    honesty in business

    Courtesy in society -
    fairness in work

    Resistance toward the wicked -
    pity and concern for the unfortunate

    Help for the weak -
    trust in the strong

    Forgiveness for the penitent -
    and, above all,

    Love for one another -
    and reverence and love for God.

    Freemasonry is a way of life.

    Women are, as a rule, not accepted as members.

    The first masonic lodge in Goulburn was instituted in 1849 by the Rev William Ross the towns first Presbyterian Minister. There are currently three Masonic lodges in Goulburn - the Goulburn Lodge of Australia number 58, the Lodge William Ross number 76 and Goulburn District Lodge 1024.

    Across the Road from the parkland beside St Saviour’s Cathedral.

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    The Railway and north Goulburn

    by wabat Written Feb 14, 2014
    Goulburn Mulwarre Viaduct from Rocky Hill
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    Please ensure that you have a map (pick one up from the tourist office on Sloane Street in the centre of town) before embarking on the sites mentioned in this tip.

    Anyone who been to Goulburn and up the WWI War Memorial on top of Rocky Hill will immediately recognise the viaduct in my main picture. When you come down into town it is nowhere to be seen and unless you know exactly where you are going it’s actually hard to find it. Big though it is, you will not stumble across it.

    Being a railway viaduct there is no public road that goes right to it. You have to head into the back streets (Grafton Street is recommended – see below) and then take a short stroll to get to it. Once you get there – well, there is the viaduct and that is it. The view from the viaduct is, unsurprisingly, the reverse of the view down from Rocky Hill.

    The brick viaduct taking trains across Mulwarre River and Ponds was constructed in 1867/68 (added to in 1915) and doubtless you will imagine that it appears an excessively large structure to get across what looks like a bit of low land with little water. Don’t be fooled. In 1867 before the viaduct was even fully completed flood waters peaked at 1.2metres below the pier tops. Talking of the piers, when you are down at the viaduct you will note that they are skewed in line with the natural water flow to minimise the chances of blockages from floating trees, sheds, houses and the like during floods - the idea being to ease such debris through.

    If you access the viaduct via a not very obvious path down to your right from the end of Grafton Street you will note an old disused railway track veering off to your left along the back of some houses. This is what remains of the Crookwell railway line, a spur off the main Goulburn Sydney line which itself crosses the viaduct. The Crookwell line was opened in 1900 and while clearly trains could not run on it today the line has never actually been officially closed.

    Goulburn is, and had been, for almost as long as it has existed famous for its prisons (something they don’t overdo in the tourist literature – but please don’t let it put you off - they are of the very secure variety here in Goulburn!) One of Goulburn’s two prisons (the rear of which you will see if you visit the St Saviour’s cemetery (as you should)) is located in this northern part of Goulburn between Maud and Cemetery Streets. The first stop on the Crookwell line was Argyle, located opposite the main gates of the prison. Prisoners coming in from Sydney and other parts of the State would arrive in Goulburn in a prisoners van which would be detached at Goulburn Station and shunted along the Crookwell line to Argyle and the then relatively new prison which had been constructed in 1884.

    Before the Crookwell line was opened, the prisoners were taken off the train at the North Goulburn station (opened 1882), one stop before Goulburn Station on the main line. North Goulburn Station is no longer operational (closed 1975) and the former station buildings which include a red brick and sandstone Gatekeeper's cottage (now privately owned) and a rather decrepit looking signal box are heritage listed buildings. If you want to have a look they are located at the northern end of Hetherington Street, which you will use to get to the WWI War Memorial if you approach it from the Sydney side of Goulburn.

    Perhaps the most interesting, and certainly the most amusing, tit bit on the North Goulburn Station is the number of tickets to it (but not back from it!) sold to local Goulburn residents. Need I say more than that a ticket to North Goulburn sufficed to ensure one’s status as a bona fide traveller when drinking ‘out of hours’ at the Railway Refreshment Rooms Bar at Goulburn Station!

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    Goulburn Train Station

    by wabat Written Feb 14, 2014
    Goulburn Train Station
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    If you are seeking information on current train travel options please see my separate transportation tip. This tip relates to the train station building and its history.

    For a number of years before it was finally opened in 1869, Goulburn had been agitating for a railway to link it with Sydney. The Sydney Railway Company had been formed in 1849 and the the first steam railway in Australia was conceived, designed and built to run between Goulburn and Sydney and so it did, in 1869. Four of the company’s six founding directors were from Goulburn and all had vested interests in getting a train (freight service) up and running. In addition to providing a much needed transport link, the train overcame the increasing problem of highwaymen robbing stagecoaches which until the arrival of the train was the only means of getting to and from Sydney.

    On the 12th of May 1868 Mayor William Davies, laid the station's foundation stone in a very hastily arranged ceremony. He had received only 24 hours notice. Why it was so hastily arranged I have been unable to determine but 24 hours was sufficient to acquire the requisite celebratory drinks as, according to the Sydney Morning Herald of 14 May, “the company present, including the work-men, proceeded to drink success to the undertaking in champagne, of which a plentiful supply had been provided”.

    While the first train steamed into Goulburn on 26 March 1869 carrying the Warwick Cricket Team from Sydney the railway was not officially opened until the 27 May 1869 by Lord Belmore, after whom the delightful Belmore Park just across the street is named. The rather beautiful brick building you see today is little changed from the original 1869 building – indeed on laying the foundation stone back in 1869 Mayor Davies predicted that this would be the only railway station ever opened in Goulburn. For some time Goulburn was the terminus of the Southern Railway line and quite a business grew to distribute goods further inland to the Riverina district and south to Victoria. The good citizens of Goulburn were very concerned when the line was extended inland to the Riverina in 1881 and later to Melbourne. The practical impacts of the extension were less than the doomsayers predicted.

    Goulburn Station remains a stop on the Southern line today. See my getting to/from Goulburn tip for more information on current day services.

    On the station platform (Platform 1 – Platforms 2 and 3 are now rarely used) you will see an Honour Roll (picture 3) listing railway employees from the Goulburn area who served in (and a number of whom died) in World War I. Quite a list for a place the size of Goulburn.

    Outside the station is a stone cairn (picture 4) containing documents marking the centenary of the Sydney to Goulburn Railway. The cairn was sealed on 24 May 1969, not to be opened until 24 May 2069. Close-by is a smaller plaque, unveiled in 2005, commemorating the 150th anniversary of rail travel on the Southern line.

    Also in the front yard (North Yard), until 1994 a goods yard now occupied by the Tourist Office, is an old weighbridge manufactured by SWR Hawke & Co of Kapunda, South Australia. Freight between Goulburn and Sydney is now carried by road, the relatively short distance (225kms) making rail freight an uneconomic option today.

    Rail Heritage Centre

    There is a Rail Heritage Centre (museum) in Goulburn but, as yet, I have not visited it so cannot comment on it. I mention it here for completeness until I do get round to visiting.

    According to information on the Web (http://www.igoulburn.com/Attractions/GoulburnRailHeritageCentre.aspx) it “operates a working Roundhouse housing heritage locomotives (steam and diesel), rolling stock and railway ephemera. The centre shows the transition of locomotive maintenance, steam to dieselization”.

    Open: Tuesday to Sunday 10am-3.30pm

    Admission: Adults $10, Concession $8, Children $5

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    National Servicemen’s Memorial

    by wabat Written Feb 13, 2014
    National Servicemen's Memorial

    Just behind the Honour Roll in Belmore Park is the smaller National Servicemen’s Memorial which was erected in 2011. This is a memorial to all the National Servicemen from Australia who served in the Navy, Army and Air Force between 1951 and 1972, “especially those who paid the supreme sacrifice”.

    National Servicemen, or "Nashos" as they are affectionately remembered as, served in Korea, Monte Bello, Malaya, Vietnam, Borneo and Malaysia.

    National Servicemen refer to those conscripted for compulsory military service between 1951 and 1972.

    The outbreak of the Korean War in 1950, coupled with the Malayan Emergency and the Viet Minh uprising against the French in Vietnam, appeared to threaten Australia directly. These were uneasy times and Australia was paranoid of “Reds under the Bed”. Recruiting for the regular Armed Services was proving insufficient so the Menzies Government re-introduced conscription which had ended in 1945.

    During this time there were two conscription calls in Australia. In the first scheme between 1951 and 1959, all males aged 18 were called up for training in the Navy, Army and Air Force. A total of 227,000 served in 52 intakes. In the second scheme, men aged 20 were selected by a birthday ballot for the Army. In this way, between June 30, 1965 and December 5, 1972, 63,790 were called up for two years fulltime service integrated into regular Army units. Of course, this second call covered Vietnam though was not exclusively so. Of the 63,790, 100 served in Borneo and 17,424 served in Vietnam. The other 46,366 served in support units in Australia, Malaysia and Papua-New Guinea.

    Conscription for Vietnam was however the most contentious and provoked great debate within the Australian community (as it did elsewhere), with university students and others taking part in large anti-conscription and anti-Vietnam War demonstrations. The National Service Scheme was abolished on 5 December 1972.

    Overall 212 National Servicemen died in action, two in Borneo and 210 in Vietnam. Of those killed in Vietnam, 3 were from Goulburn.

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    Goulburn-Mulwaree Honour Roll

    by wabat Written Feb 13, 2014
    Goulburn Honour Roll
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    Typically (and especially so in the case of country towns in Australia) War Memorials occupy prime positions in the centre of town. Goulburn’s WWI and best known (art deco) war memorial is actually located on Rocky Hill on the outskirts of Goulburn and it was at this memorial that until fairly recently Goulburn’s annual Remembrance Day and ANZAC Day services were held. See my separate tip - Lighthouse or War Memorial?

    The town's Boer War Memorial erected in 1904 and thus pre-dating the WWI memorial by 20 years is, in fact, in the centre of town in Belmore Park, as is the subject of this tip, the Goulburn-Mulwaree Honour Roll. Given the lack of parking space and general space for visitors at Rocky Hill, Remembrance Day and ANZAC Day services are now held here at the Honour Roll.

    The Honour Roll, I am not sure why it is not called a War Memorial, was officially unveiled by Mr Roderick John MacLean JP and dedicated by the Rev Wes Llewellyn, 18th May 2002 and represented the culmination of more than two and a half years of work by RSL Goulburn Sub Branch secretary Rod MacLean.

    It is a large semi-circular brick and concrete wall to which are attached 22 bronze name plaques commemorating and containing the names of 3000 servicemen and women (including those from the Merchant Navy) from the Goulburn and Mulwaree Shire who served in WW2, the Korean War, the Borneo/Malayan Emergency and the Vietnam War. 130 of those listed paid the ultimate sacrifice.

    The badges, most clearly visible in my second picture, are those of the Royal Australian Navy, the Australian Commonwealth Military Forces, the Royal Australian Air Force and the Merchant Navy.

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    Elmslea Clambers – Art Deco at its best

    by wabat Written Feb 12, 2014
    Elmslea Chambers

    I have to say I was rather surprised when I came across this building in Goulburn. I have got used to rather grand late 1800s civic buildings in country towns such at the courthouse here in Goulburn. Such buildings were built in boom times –a gold-rush and agricultural boom in this area.

    The 1900s and the depression saw a general decline across country New South Wales, a decline from which country towns have never really recovered.

    Elmslea Clambers was built in 1935-36 at the end of the great depression – perhaps in the expectation of boom times ahead or just a celebration of its owners flamboyant personality. The building was designed by LP Burns and built as trading premises for Frank Leahy, a wealthy pastoralist and stock (as in animals) dealer.

    The totally out of place, for Goulburn, art deco/ Rococo- façade in multicoloured terracotta incorporates four pilasters faced with pink marble topped by Corinthian capitals and rosettes. Above the entrance, in baked ceramic tiles, is a ram’s head set against a typical art deco sunburst. The ram’s head conveys the line of business and source of wealth of Leahy and is flanked by paired ibises in stylised flowers. The whole building actually looks very Egyptian to me.

    The building is now the offices of an accounting firm and not open to the pubic.

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    Goulburn Post Office

    by wabat Written Oct 28, 2013

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    Goulburn Post Office
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    The grandeur of Goulburn's Post Office harks back to the late 1800s when Goulburn was a thriving regional centre - riding on the crest of both a gold and agriculture boom.

    The building's Victorian Italianate style is in keeping with the Court House, Town Hall (next door) and other civic buildings designed by the colonial (government) architect of the day, James Barnet. The building was constructed in 1881 by builder F.Horn.

    The Post Office was fully restored in 2012 (in time for Goulburn's 150th birthday in 2013) and is now looking great with a clock that shows the right time - something of a rarity in older buildings nowadays. For those checking my photos I did not stand ogling at the building for 30 minutes but rather passed it twice on the morning the photos were taken.

    By way of background, Goulburn’s first postmaster was appointed in 1832 when mail was delivered by mounted police to Goulburn from Bong Bong, Campbelltown, Liverpool and Sydney once a week. Mail from Melbourne didn’t commence until 1839 and then only on a fortnightly basis. By 1863 mail to Sydney was leaving daily except Sundays. The steady increase in business made a larger post office building necessary and such was the reason for building the current post office in 1881.

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    “More for ornament than use” - Goulburn Courthouse

    by wabat Written Oct 27, 2013

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    Goulburn Courthouse
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    Looking at this magnificent Victorian Italianate Goulburn Courthouse brought back to my mind some of the grand colonial buildings of India. I certainly hadn’t anticipated seeing such a structure here in what I might unfairly call sleepy old Goulburn.

    Since Goulburn was the largest town in the district, this court house (the towns fourth and opened in 1887) was both local and district courts as well as supreme court.

    The building was designed by Government Architect James Barnet and is one of the most spectacular court houses in New South Wales and, indeed, Australia featuring a copper dome, colonnaded facade and an apparently richly decorated interior. It is surrounded by attractive gardens and is enclosed by an iron pike fence – added in the 1900s. The keystone over the central arch depicts Queen Victoria (picture three).

    Indeed, on opening the court, Chief Justice Darley described it as “ a courtroom which I venture to say takes rank amongst the best courtrooms in any part of her Majesty's dominions” and continued by expressing his hope that one day Sydney would have a comparable edifice.

    Darley continued:

    “…..from personal experience from having come on circuit twice this year, I am entitled to hold the opinion that no more law-abiding, orderly, peaceable, and, I trust, God-fearing, people exist than those who inhabit this great Southern district; and the highest compliment I feel I can pay to the district is to express the hope that this great building may continue to be, as it now is, more for orna- ment than for use”.

    Having opened the court the business of the day continued……..

    Terence Maloney was found guilty of assaulting a woman at Bungendore, and was remanded for sentence. James Cronan pleaded guilty to maliciously killing a horse at Queanbeyan, and was also remanded for sentence. John Hickey was found guilty of assaulting and robbing a man named Rogers at Duck Flat, near Bungendore (apparently with good cause though!).

    A banquet followed where the Chief Justice (obviously based in Sydney) again lamented the existence of suitable court facilities in Sydney before the obligatory toasts were proposed. The night concluded with toasts to “The Ladies” and “The Press”. I shall refrain from comment.

    Internally (no access unless on court business - as it remains a working courthouse) the courthouse contains two large courtrooms, offices, a grand foyer, underground tunnels and an old morgue (at the rear). Hangings were from gallows on the front lawn though I understand, unlike many other places where public hangings were a form of public entertainment, large tarpaulins shielded the masses from the show here in Goulburn. It was felt that such displays could have a demoralising effect, especially on the young.

    One such hanging was of Mary Ann Brownlow, the last woman to be hanged in Goulburn, in 1855, for the murder of her wastrel (wasteful or good for nothing) husband. Brownlow subsequently took up residence as the courthouse ghost and continues to haunt the place to this very day. Following the performance of play The Ballad of Mary Ann Brownlow (the hanging was very controversial but not a matter for this review) in the courthouse in 2005, Sheriff Stanberg said that he had “received many complaints from people sitting in the upstairs gallery who claimed they had been touched on the shoulder or that their hair had been flipped by an unseen hand”.

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    Remembering the Forgotten - Boer War Memorial

    by wabat Written Oct 27, 2013

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    Belmore Park - Boer War Memorial
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    The Second Boer War (1899–1902), which ended with the Treaty of Vereeniging and the conversion of the Boer republics into British colonies involved large numbers of troops from many British possessions right across the world.

    Seeing this Boer War Memorial beautifully located among the flowers in Belmore Park right in the centre of Goulburn got me thinking that the Second Boer War was very much a coming together, not under ideal circumstances, of Empire - the last great war restricted to Empire participants and ironically Australia’s first war as a nation following Federation in 1901. I recalled visiting the Boer War memorial not many months ago in my home-town of Enniskillen (Northern Ireland) on the other side of the world. Everywhere you go in Australia there are Boer War memorials. The peaceful island of St Helena, mid Atlantic, which I also visited earlier in the year, hosted significant numbers of Boers in prisoner of war camps. Canada hosts numerous memorials and I could go on.

    As indicated above, the Second Boer War was first war in which Australia fought as a nation and also the first in which it fought along side its New Zealand counterparts - forerunners to the ANZACs. In 1899 New South Wales troops, including many from the Goulburn area, were the first to join in this war. After Federation in 1901 Australian units took part. Australians made up five per cent of all Commonwealth forces serving in South Africa during the conflict, which was a significant contribution given the size of its population.

    The sandstone Memorial was unveiled on 14 November 1904 to commemorate those from the Goulburn and surrounding districts who served in the war and was paid for by public subscription. It records the names of seventy six local men of whom four died.

    A special remembrance service was held at this memorial in 2013, the first in over 100 years – clearly a case of remembering the forgotten.

    “For love of the Motherland, that grew with years, and faltered not in death. Soon rested, those who fought.”

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