Gundagai Things to Do

  • Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    by Adelaide79
  • Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    by Adelaide79
  • Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    Limestone Inn {ruins.}
    by Adelaide79

Most Recent Things to Do in Gundagai

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    Joseph Carberry's Inn {ruins.}

    by Adelaide79 Written Feb 28, 2012
    Limestone Inn {ruins.}
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    These ruins are all that is left of the once standing Limestone Inn.

    Built by Joseph and Rosannah Carberry in 1857, it consisted of 12 rooms, cellar, detached kitchen, storeroom and stables. All built from stone.

    The Limestone Inn was built to accommodate travellers on the main road between Sydney and Melbourne.

    In April 1861 a bushranger names Jack-in-the-boots held up the Inn demanding money from the staff and patrons.

    The name was later changed by the Carberry's to "The Australian Arms" as well as "The Squatter's Arms" and was finally closed in 1876.

    Now all you will find is this rickety wooden fence and piles of debris that are the ruins of this inn.

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    Dog on the Tuckerbox

    by Dxenion Updated Apr 4, 2011
    One dog on the Tuckerbox and three on the ground!

    It's a great place to take a break on long trips between Sydney and Melbourne. Plenty of shady trees and picnic areas. Lots of parking space for towing vehicles. There's also a cafe here and an extensive roadhouse about 200 metres up the road.

    Here is the 3rd (and current) version of the poem by Jack Moses that inspired the statue:

    ‘Nine Miles from Gundagai”
    I've done my share of shearing sheep,
    Of droving and all that;
    And bogged a bullock team as well,
    On a Murrumbidgee Flat.
    I've seen the bullock stretch and strain
    And blink his bleary eye,
    And the dog sat on the tuckerbox
    Nine miles from Gundagai.
    I've been jilted, jarred and crossed in love,
    And sand-bagged in the dark,
    Till, if a mountain fell on me,
    I'd treat it as a lark.
    It's when you've got your bullocks bogged,
    That's the time you flog and cry,
    And the dog sits on the tuckerbox
    Nine miles from Gundagai.
    We've all got our little troubles,
    In life's hard, stony way.
    Some strike them in a motor car,
    And others in a dray.
    But when your dog and bullocks strike,
    It ain't no apple pie,
    And the dog sits on the tuckerbox
    Nine miles from Gundagai.
    But that's all past and dead and gone,
    And I've sold the team for meat,
    And perhaps, some day where I was bogged,
    There'll be an asphalt street,
    The dog? Ah, well he got a bait,
    And thought he'd like to die,
    So we buried him in the tuckerbox,
    Nine miles from Gundagai.

    Couldn't resist a photo of the fur-kids in front of the famous statue.

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    GUNDAGAI..VISIT THE TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE

    by DennyP Written Aug 17, 2008
    GUNDAGAI THEATRE..
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    Upon arrival in Gundagai visit the tourist information centre..as well as obtaining any relevant information needed the centre has some interesting things to see..There is a miniature marble cathedral constructed by almost twenty one thousand pieces of marble built by a Mr Frank Rusconi over a period of 28 years in his spare time..A gemstone collection is also on show as are photos of the devestating floods....ask about the walking tours...

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    The museum

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 14, 2006
    Museum

    Since its opening in 1968, the Gundagai Museum has displayed a wealth of historical memorabilia depicting a life that was both hard and gracious. Special exhibits include Phar Lap's saddlecloth, the shirt worn by Banjo Patterson's Kiley of Kileys Run and the assayer's bowl used by US President Herbert Hoover. The museum also features displays on bushrangers; Melba XV; the famous Gundagai cow; and Aboriginal hero Yarri. Other items in its collection include scaled models of early buildings and historical photographs and documents.
    I find it amazing to think that in a relatively small town such as this they can, in their collection, have approximately 10,000 items of historical memorabilia. Extraordinary.

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    The bridges

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 14, 2006
    Long way to nowhere
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    The Railway Bridge built in 1901 is slowly suffering the vagaries of time but still cuts a notable swathe across the flood plain to the south of the town, the natural divide between it and its southern cousin.
    Here and there are even older gum trees, hopefully they can survive the drought.

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    Classic Aussie pub

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 14, 2006
    Classic pub

    There's two towns here, South Gundagai and Gundagai itself. They're not separated by much but there is about a kilometre between them. This is a beautiful refurbished hotel just on the south side.
    The Old Bridge Inn with its latticed verandah is a standout, dating from the 1850's.

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    2006 - not a very good year

    by iandsmith Written Nov 14, 2006
    The face of drought
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    In many places I normally travel to, the drought that was mentioned so often in the press really hadn't made a huge impact. Sure it was dry but there was some water about. Then I headed south on the Hume Highway, Australia's busiest.
    It was here that the vastness of it all became apparent. For around 700 kilometres this is what it looked like and Gundagai was suffering along with all the other towns en route.

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    Rusconi's masterpiece

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 11, 2004
    A masterpiece indeed

    Whilst this piece is very interesting, the story behind it is extraordinary.
    You know when you are travelling and sometimes you take time out and discover a little treasure? I hope so, because I've had the pleasure many times and this one is a gem.
    A man called Frank Rusconi (1874-1964)was passionate about marble. He was also passionate about Australian marble. He fervently believed that it was as good, if not better, than Italian marble and he was partially responsible for the opening of many marble quarries in N.S.W. To ram home his point he had a concept to construct a model building with tower. This was not to be your average model. For three hours a night for 28 years from 1910 he worked on this piece despite becoming blind in one eye in 1922. He used 20 different kinds of marble and, remarkably, like Gaudi, he had no plan, it was all in his head. He would construct a part and store it until the final structure came together in 1938.
    He used 4,368 flick saw blades, 14 dozen files and 45lbs (over 20 kilos) of emery grain to get the final 20,948 pieces that were eventually used, and that's not to mention a further 9,011 that he discarded!
    On the main entrance alone there are 41 inlaid pieces using 5 different kinds of marble.
    His fame was not limited to Australia. He also worked on a cathedral (St. Marie's)outside Paris and oversaw work on the marble stairway of Westminister Abbey. In another place and time I have no doubt his fame would have been more widespread than it is today but his most famous legacy to Australia is the sculpture of the immortal "Dog on the tuckerbox" five miles from Gundagai.
    It costs just $2 to see the masterpiece at the local tourist information centre.

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    The longest wooden bridge

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 2, 2003

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    Road traffic to the left, rail to the right please

    The Railway Bridge built in 1901 and the sprawling Prince Alfred Bridge of 1866 - the longest timber viaduct in Australia - are two notable constructions.
    From an almost common starting point they diverge at about 10 degrees across an old flood plain.
    Standing at the beginning and looking down the volumes of wood until they disappear into the distance gives one a sense of awe at the amount of labour involved in the initial construction and how labour intensive the maintenance must have been.
    From an everyday item of use they have become museum pieces due to the rarity of such spans today.
    I personally found it very moving just gazing at this now lifeless structure, once so essential to the town.

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    Architecture

    by iandsmith Written Nov 14, 2006
    Location, location

    Dating from 1903 this building today serves, occasionally, as a coffee lounge.
    It's located on the main intersection in the town

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