Kosciuszko National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • Kosciuszko Rose
    Kosciuszko Rose
    by iandsmith
  • Along Ramshead
    Along Ramshead
    by iandsmith
  • Along the plateau on Dead Horse Gap Trail
    Along the plateau on Dead Horse Gap...
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Kosciuszko National Park

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    Dead Horse Gap trail continued

    by iandsmith Written Jan 8, 2013
    Junction of Dead Horse Gap and Thredbo Creek trail
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    The Alpine Way was just across the other side and now motor vehicles contributed to the noise, though thankfully only occasionally, for it’s not a road for the fainthearted. Lorraine was keen to move further down the Thredbo Creek walk, for that was now the one we were on and, about 20 minutes later, we found a shady spot on some rocks in the river to have our repast. It was another memorable lunch among many we’d had this trip, none of which will be forgotten.
    We pushed on after that, more goal driven than photography driven, an anxiety to get out of the heat was also foremost in our minds, though when you were in shade it was tolerable. At least it was all gentle downhill and in what seemed no time at all we reached the extremity of the golf course and cruised into the park where I couldn’t resist photographing yet more dragonflies.
    At the start of the day I suggested we take the chair to the summit again and have a celebratory cuppa at Australia’s highest restaurant, the Eagles Nest, and that’s what we did, Lorraine ordering her first ever iced chocolate and we also had some of the nicest garlic prawns we’d ever tasted whilst admiring the extensive panorama over Thredbo.
    It had been another wonderful day, what would tomorrow hold.

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    Dead Horse Gap trail

    by iandsmith Written Jan 8, 2013
    Among the dead snow gums
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    DEAD HORSE, DEAD TREES, DEAD ROCKS, IS THERE LIFE UP HERE?
    It was amazing how dog tired we were after each day and yet, in the morning, we felt revived enough to attack yet another walk. This time it was to be Dead Horse Gap from Crackenback and then down Thredbo Creek back to the motorhome which would take our total for the four days to about 40 kilometres.
    The healing powers of sleep will never be underestimated by Lorraine and me but we also knew this would be our last serious walk of the tour.
    It was chairlift to the top of Crackenback and then left this time instead of straight ahead to Kosciuszko. This took us initially past Ramshead, that rugged yet brittle clump of rocks that are much more dramatic than anything Kosciuszko had to offer. Set beyond the summer blooms they dominate the landscape initially offering a stark contrast to the softness of the tiny petals. Further on high the gossamer cirrus clouds eked patterns out in an otherwise brilliant blue sky; we were feeling like privileged people, just how good was this.
    The track is just that; no broad boardwalk today, simply a narrow rut through the flora heading off over the horizon and then descending through a surreal landscape of bleached snow gums darting off at all angles. Defoliated by the horrendous 2003 bushfires, the skeletal remains were so eye catching we stumbled now and then gaping at them. The lignotuber regrowth is different to other trees, they don’t sprout from the branches but from the base and, in this harsh climate, it’s a slow process. It was remarkable to see them in their thousands and know they would all fall over one day but so far stood erect, though lifeless.
    Here and there shadows were cast eerily across the tussock grass while Spanish Moss clung precariously to some holes in the dead branches; an occasional fern cluster sheltered at the base of rock groups and here and there a trickle filtered its way to the master stream below. The wildflowers grabbed a spot wherever they could, the eggs and bacon native pea were more pronounced now while the delightful Kosciuszko Rose showed up here and there.
    Then we started on the steps, the fresh rushing waters of Thredbo Creek could be clearly heard about a kilometre away as we moved on without stopping for pics for a change, eagerly seeking a sight of the river.
    We reached it and I refilled the water bottle as I had done countless times over the previous days, the promise of pure mountain stream water to good to resist and everywhere it had been crystal clear, filtered water from the melting snows.

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    Spring thaw

    by iandsmith Written Jan 7, 2011

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    Eyeing off the fall
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    We were on our way back from a day's skiing, having parked at Guthega. The latter is a critical point because, if you go to Perisher you may get caught a kilometre or more from the carpark on busy days, such as it was on this particular occasion.
    The down side of Guthega is that part of the road in is dirt, often badly corrugated, though it is only for a few kilometres.
    An often unnoticed up side is that the scenery is better and, if you're prepared to alight from your vehicle and do a bit of walking you can have an experience such as I did here; enjoying the wild country that surrounds the snowfields.
    This waterfall and accompanying cascades can be seen from the road (the dirt part) and, though it involves only a short walk, it is very steep, almost precipitous, so I wouldn't recommend it for the fainthearted.

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    Charlotte Pass Village

    by Intrepidduck Updated Dec 6, 2005

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    Charlotte Pass Alpine Village
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    Although skiing as a leisure activity began in the 1860s at the Kiandra goldfields it was at Charlotte Pass where the ski resort had it's origins for Australia, back in the early 1930s. This was with the construction of the Kosciusko Chalet by the NSW Government Tourist Office and as the winter base for various ski clubs. The first chalet burnt down in 1937, however the following year a new and larger establishment was constructed and remains today. It was also at Charlotte Pass where the first sucessful mechanical ski lift was installed in the mid 1930s. While resort development boomed in the decades following the second world war Charlotte Pass grew very slowly until the 1970s, however it remains a small skiing resort compared to Thredbo Village and Perisher Valley.

    Interestingly Charlotte Pass is Australia's highest ski village at 1830m and where the coldest temperature has been recorded minus 22 Celsius. Charlotte Pass is the only "snowbound" resort during the winter season, access is only by snow cat vehicle adding to the secluded mountain atmosphere. Like most ski villages in Australia there are a number of clubs associated to it's community, management and function.

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