Mudgee Off The Beaten Path

  • Havilah Church
    Havilah Church
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  • Off The Beaten Path
    by balhannah
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by balhannah

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Mudgee

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    RYLSTONE - PART 4

    by balhannah Updated Nov 15, 2009

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    Bras a round the trees
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    On the road from Lue to Rylstone we pass through nice scenery including vineyards, olive groves, and nice mountain views. Coming into Rylstone, I noticed this was a larger Town, it had a population of more than 1000 people!

    A lot of the buildings were old, and heritage listed, a bit like stepping back in time.

    The town acts as a gateway to the World Heritage-listed Wollemi National Park to the east, and the scenic Capertee Valley to the south. These are the Mountains we were viewing when driving to here.

    At the time I visited, there were Bras in the street everywhere. On inquiring, why?......
    I found out that it was to raise money for the Cancer foundation.
    For every Bra, there was a $5 entry which went to the Cancer fund, somebody had a different idea for fundraising.
    By the look of it, plenty of people participated!

    A little history..............
    The town grew up on the site of a camping spot for stockmen, and many of the fine buildings were built as a result of profit earned from agriculture and mining. Back in 1861, the notorious bushranger, Captain Thunderbolt, spent the night in the town's lock-up while being transported to Bathurst to stand trial for horse theft.

    There was a Tourist bus here, and even though it is "off the beaten track" some people know about it!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

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    KANDOS - PART 7

    by balhannah Written Nov 11, 2009

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    views from lookout
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    As you drive out of town, heading to Ilford, make sure you stop at the lookouts. We did, and the view was beautiful. You overlook Kandos, the countryside and the Coomber Melon Mountain Range.

    As well, you get to see just how far the rope-way goes for, even then, it goes further than the eye can see.

    This was our last stop on our scenic tourist drive that began in Mudgee.
    Thanks to the lady at the Mudgee information centre for sending us on this interesting journey.

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    KANDOS - PART 6

    by balhannah Updated Nov 11, 2009

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    The rope-way crossing the road
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    After enjoying my walk around Rylstone, it was back in the car and onto the next town which was Kandos (est.1913)

    This Town had an interesting sight as we were driving in, a flying fox (rope - way) carrying buckets across roads and over the country side, we never did find the end.

    We did find out that Kandos is an industrial town, and that the New South Wales Cement Lime and Coal Company has its operations here because of local supplies of limestone. Coal, limestone and shale were discover in the 1800's, with the town only flourishing in 1915 when cement manufacturing began. The rope-way carries the limestone from the quarries to the plant for processing.
    The Kandos Cement works are now the largest in the southern hemisphere.

    Of interest is the way Kandos was named. The town got its name from an acronym based on the names of the six directors of the company.

    It also was one of the first towns in NSW to have electric lighting, which was generated at the factory.

    There is an industrial museum in Town if you are interested, we did not go in.

    And..........in this town, there were strings of Bras hanging across the streets, once again, raising money for the Cancer foundation.

    Located on Lue road, Ilford end.

    Related to:
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    WALK RYLSTONE - PART 5

    by balhannah Written Nov 11, 2009

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    Rylstone
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    Rylstone is a pretty village with many heritage-listed stone buildings.

    It's a good idea to pick up a brochure for the Rylstone Heritage Walk and learn more about the town’s colonial-era sandstone buildings, including its four stone churches and early stone and timber cottage, the post and telecommunications office, the police station, courthouse and Shire Hall.

    It's not a big village, and the walk is easy.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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    LUE - PART 3

    by balhannah Written Nov 10, 2009

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    Lue Pub
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    So, we are back in the car and continuing our journey, when we come across the 1st town, Lue, [pronounced loo-eee]

    Nothing to get excited about here, a Railway station, a few houses, and of course, a Pub.

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    • Road Trip

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    HAVILAH CHURCH - Part 2

    by balhannah Written Nov 10, 2009

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    Havilah Church
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    After spotting the Homestead, we could see a gorgeous, pretty little stone Church located near the road, so the car was stopped, and off I went to explore.

    I found out this information..................
    Havilah Memorial Church, which is built of stone, was attended by the White family. It was built in 1905 in memory of Henry Charles White, who bought Havilah from the original owner in 1881.
    It is a small family chapel, but quite isolated from the house. Officially an Anglican Church, it is now mostly used for baptisms and weddings.

    The church is located on "Havilah," on the Lue Road.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    HAVILAH on the Mudgee to Ilford road - Part 1

    by balhannah Updated Nov 10, 2009

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    Near Havilah Station

    Our helpful lady at the Tourist info centre in Mudgee asked where we were off to next. Our answer was to Bathurst, via Sofala.
    She said to us, rather than go down the main road, to take the scenic Tourist drive instead.
    Well we took her info, and am so glad we did, as this road had plenty of interesting sights and nice scenery.

    So, hop in the virtual travel car, and we will begin our journey

    Our 1st sighting, was a huge Homestead in the distance, couldn't see much of it, but found out it was Havilah Station (built 1850's)
    The property, which received its name after a visiting clergyman discovered specks of gold and, citing from Genesis, referred to it as the ‘land of Havilah’, it became famous for breeding a fine strain of merino sheep.

    The impressive homestead was originally a ten-room mansion . When it changed hands, extensions were added, these were finished in the mid-1880s.
    The homestead with its two-storey brick wings on the east and west of the house, chapel-like kitchen and massive chimneys made this a magnificent building. It is registered with the National Trust of New South Wales.

    The new owner still concentrated on sheep-breeding, but he also developed a stud of race-horses which became famous throughout New South Wales.

    Follow the Brown tourist drive signs that say to Lue (take the Lue road)

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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Mudgee Off The Beaten Path

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