Queen Victoria Building, Sydney

4.5 out of 5 stars 52 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Queen Victoria Building, Sydney
    Queen Victoria Building, Sydney
    by antistar
  • Queen Victoria Building, Sydney
    Queen Victoria Building, Sydney
    by antistar
  • Queen Victoria Building
    by wise23girl
  • kooka3's Profile Photo

    The Great Australian Clock

    by kooka3 Written Jul 27, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This clock was put into the QVB about 5 years ago in mid-2000, and is pretty impressive. It's suspended from the Centre Dome of the building, and is the world's larges hanging animated turret clock. It weights 4 tonnes and is 10 metres tall. There are 32 clocks, 12 of which show international times.There are 33 paintings, and 138 hand carved figurines.

    It tells the story of Australia from both Aborigianal and European perspectives. One of the key features of the clock is a symbolic Aboriginal figure that circles continuously around an upper level of the clock, representing the passage of time. It is based on a elder from Australia's Treeless Plains. As it pses by the scenes, some of them light up or become animated. To see this figure, it's best to go to the highest level.

    QVB clock
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • yellowbell's Profile Photo

    Shopping Mall and Museum rolled into one

    by yellowbell Updated Jul 20, 2005

    The 1890's Byzantine inspired architecture became a concert hall, municipal offices and now a shopping mall. This is really the most exquisite shopping mall I've ever seen with it's stained glass windows, domes and wood panelling.

    Take time to look at the hanging clock which features moving tableaux of British kings and queens every hour, on the hour.

    It's a mini museum for me since the upper floor showcases permanent exhibition of replicas of British crown jewels and personal effects of Queen Victoria.

    Pictures of old QVB lined walls of the staircase.

    Queen Victoria Building
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • wkcsmt's Profile Photo

    QVB

    by wkcsmt Written Feb 25, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    QVB is a grand shopping arcade with Romanesque architecture. QVB was built in 1898 to replace the old George Street markets and undergone refurbished in 1986. In here, you'll see exquisite stained glass windows, the 19th century staircase, architecturely detailed arches / balustrades / pillars...

    QVB has been described by Pierre Cardin as "the most beautiful shopping centre in the world". Come visit & you can be the judge!

    QVB
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • kooka3's Profile Photo

    Go if you're looking for high priced shopping

    by kooka3 Updated Jan 25, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This building -- called the QVB by Sydneysiders -- is beautiful. If you're into nice buildings, go check it out. The shops, however, are very high priced - so if you're thinking about buying anything, be prepared for the pricetag!!

    Information Desks are located near the centre dome on both Ground Level and Level Two, where you can get centre directions, general information and a city map to assist you around town.

    The QVB also provides a guided walking tour through the QVB with a member of the Information Staff who are IATG certified Tourist guides. On the tour you will be provided with historical facts and figures on one of Sydney's most famous buildings. Tours run twice daily and leave from the Information Desk. Book through the info desk (or call the number below).

    The basement does have restaurants and a stop of a train station.

    The lower, mezzanine level (basement) provides one of the city’s busiest pedestrian concourses connecting Town Hall railway station to the Pitt Street Mall.

    At ground level, the gradual rise in George Street has been cleverly absorbed into the design with shops steadily rising in height along the length of the block.

    The QVB is open: M-W & F-S 9am - 6pm; Th: 9am - 9pm; Sun. & public holidays I I am - 5pm. Some stores, cafes, & restaurants open longer.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Building

    by MikeAtSea Written Jan 11, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Queen Victoria Building, now affectionately known as the QVB, was designed by George McRae and completed in 1898, replacing the original Sydney markets on the site. Built as a monument to the long reigning monarch, construction took place in dire times, as Sydney was in a severe recession.
    Today it is home to some of the most expensive retail outlets in Sydney - its architecture is still striking though!!

    Queen Victoria Building
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BerniShand's Profile Photo

    THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING

    by BerniShand Updated Dec 28, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    what a great place to spend a very wet morning ! rescued and restored the QVB echoes with late Victorian grace and charm, mixed with stylish shops and quirky features
    When you visit make sure you are there on the hour for the automatated clocks to do their party pieces, the upper level gives you the best views of them

    other interesting things to see are the baby grand pianos playing away and the superb Chinese jade wedding carriage, even the toilets are a treat ! they are wonderfully restored

    its a great place to wander, window shop and meet people, dont forget to check out the lovely stained glass windows and the antiquated lifts

    one of the automated clocks
    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    QVB

    by martin_nl Updated Nov 4, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB as referred to by the locals, takes up an entire city block and is completely filled with about 190 shops. All sorts of shops like clothing, jewellery, shoes, art, hairdresser etc. are presented. There are also loads of places where you can have a classy - read expensive - sandwich. However the lower ground level of the QVB is connected to the Myer department store and there you will find a superb foodcourt with cheap food of all sorts.

    When you visit the QVB make sure you go to the top level where you can find Peter Lik's Gallery. You'll be amazed by his photography. Prices are quite steep, but if you want to have a souvenir like this, this is the best place to go.

    The QVB
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Building

    by seagoingJLW Written Aug 27, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit the Queen Victoria Building with its upscale mall in this 1898 Byzantine building. It replaced the original Sydney Markets, then became a concert hall. Eventually it became the City Library.

    It was remodelled in the 1930s and used for varied purposes. In 1984 it was completely refurbished as a shopping center with more than 200 shops.

    Queen Victoria Building

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Building

    by Sweetberry1 Updated Aug 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This outstanding building occupies an entire city block. It was built in 1898 to replace the original Sydney Markets.
    Later, it accommodated a concert hall, which eventually became the City Library.
    In 1984 it was completely refurbished as a shopping centre, with more than 200 shops.
    The renovations were done by the Malaysian company Ipoh Garden Berhad.
    The turn of the century charm of this building was successfully retained.

    Open Daily

    Queen Victoria Building..
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Queen Victoria Building

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 5, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Queen Victoria Building often called the QVB. It’s a great example of what foresight can do. The ornate sandstone building is topped with three large copper-clad domes and was built originally as a produce market. The market was moved to The Haymarket (Paddy's Market) in Chinatown (Hay Street) and around 1930, the QVB was turned into offices. It eventually fell into disrepair and stood empty for several years facing demolition because of the prime land it sat on.

    A Malaysian company gutted the building and tuned the interior into the interior into four above-ground floors and a basement of boutiques and restaurants. A fabulous building to visit.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Statue

    by Canadienne Updated Mar 31, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While you're admiring the Queen Victoria Building, you'll notice this statue at one end (Southern, I think). The statue originally stood in front of the Irish Parliament, but was removed in 1947. . .it disappeared and was eventually located in a small Irish town in the early 80's.

    Queen Victoria Statue
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Canadienne's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Building

    by Canadienne Updated Mar 31, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Today, the QVB is a mall ~ filled with fairly upscale shops and boutiques. I don't recommend it for that reason, but for the beautiful exterior architecture. There are over 20 copper domes topping the building. . .a peek inside is worthwhile as well, as the glass-sectioned ceiling lets in light.

    The building takes up a full city block and it was originally a produce market. A great deal of money was spent on saving the building in the early 1980s and it re-opened as a shopping centre later in that decade.

    Sydney's outdoors are so beautiful ~ be careful not to get sucked into shopping. . .a quick detour through the building is all that is necessary.

    Queen Victoria Building, Sydney
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • sunnywong's Profile Photo

    Queen Victoria Building (QVB) - interior

    by sunnywong Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Queen Victoria Building "the most beautiful shopping centre in the world". Known as the QVB, this is a ritzy and expensive place to shop, but an absolutely beautiful building inside and out. Houses over 200 specialty stores.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • jrs1234's Profile Photo

    Go window shopping (or spend...

    by jrs1234 Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Go window shopping (or spend money if you wish) in the Queen Victoria Building (near the Town Hall). It's amazing inside, and it's pretty neat outside too... Next door to it (and linked by an underground walkway) is Town Hall Station, a very handy place to catch your train if you're heading to the suburbs.

    Was this review helpful?

  • KiwiDi's Profile Photo

    Visit the Queen Victoria...

    by KiwiDi Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit the Queen Victoria Building (or 'QVB' as its known to Sydneysiders). It is a 1890's emporium with stained glass windows, mosaic tiled floors, sweeping staircases, iron-wrought balconies and grand central dome. There are over 200 stores inside, mostly boutique shops... but it is just gorgeous to have a stroll around and admire the architecture. At Xmas there is a huge Xmas tree that pokes up through 4 floors!

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Sydney

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

40 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Queen Victoria Building
4.0 out of 5 stars
6 Reviews
0 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Sydney hotels