Taree Off The Beaten Path

  • Nice View
    Nice View
    by ASTIEL
  • A huge tree at the nature reserve
    A huge tree at the nature reserve
    by Jerelis
  • LOOK! you can see my place from here
    LOOK! you can see my place from here
    by ASTIEL

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Taree

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - (Historical) Facts

    by Jerelis Written Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    * Wingham Brush Nature Reserve is a 10ha sub-tropical floodplain rainforest;
    * Wingham Brush is rich in plant life, with 143 species of native plants, including 76 species of trees and 32 different vines;
    * The Nature Reserve was set aside for flora protection and public recreation in 1909 and added to in 1916;
    * The Brush has been extensively restored from its vine-covered state of early 1980s;
    * The Brush is one of the most significant maternity sites in New South Wales for the grey-headed Flying Fox (Pteropus Poliocephalus);
    * As many as 100,000 of these fascinating creatures hang in the Brush's huge Moreton Bay Fig trees during summer;
    * The huge Moreton Bay Fig trees (Ficus Macrophylla) are hundreds of years old;
    * An Aboriginal corroboree ground is located within the Reserve and the remains of two cedar sawpits can still be seen in the Northern section of the Brush.
    * The Australian brush turkey belongs to the family of birds known as megapodes.

    The Manning River during sunset.
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - More Flying Foxes

    by Jerelis Written Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The other bat species at Wingham Brush is the little Red Flying Fox, a nomadic bat which wanders the eucalypt foresrs of New South Wales, Queensland and Northern Territory.

    It's now recognised that bats have a vital role to play as pollinators of eucalypt trees and distributors of seed, each doing the work of thousands of bees.

    During the 1960s public outcry about the Flying Foxes' presence in the town of Wingham resulted in several attempts to exterminate them. Luckily none were effective.

    A Flying Fox is spreading it's wings.
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - Flying Foxes!

    by Jerelis Written Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The dense riverside reserve is gome to thousands of Flying Foxes which migrate here annually from September to May when the Brush is replete with ferns, orchids, giant Moreton Fig trees, bougainvillea, other subtropical plants and 100 species of birds, including a number of Brush turkeys.

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve's role a maternity site comes therefore in Oxtober as thousands of Grey-headed Flying Foxes arrive to give birth. Each has a single offspring which clings to its mother's nipple and fur, even while the female venture out at night for up to 40 kilometres to forage for food. Young bats can fly when 8 - 10 weeks old, becoming independent at three months. Following mating in March - April the colony disperses but several hundreds bats usually stay over the winter.

    Really, really a lot of Flying Foxes!!! A lot of Flying Foxes just hanging around!
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - Hiking / Auch!

    by Jerelis Updated Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is hard to believe that each of the rainforest giants with their massive buttress roots began life as tiny seed deposited in the fork of a host tree by roosting bird or bat. They grew year by year, to the ground, eventually taking over their host to become some of New South Wales' largest remaining fig trees.

    Like many rainforests, Wingham Brush is rich in trees producing nectar, pollen-rich flowers and succulent fruit. Some of the more interesting trees include the Giant Stinging Tree. The leaves of these trees can deliver a painful sting so be careful not to touch them!

    Beautiful wetland surroundings at the Reserve.
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - Hiking / Turkey!

    by Jerelis Written Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the back of the Nature Reserve we saw and heard some significant animals; the Brush turkeys. They nest in large mounds fashioned from leaf litter and forest debris. Brush turkeys are generally wary of humans. However, they can become very tame around picnic grounds and homes, particularly if they are fed. Feeding brush turkeys is not recommended.

    An Aboriginal corroboree ground is located within the Reserve and the remains of two cedar sawpits can still be seen in the Northern section of the Brush.

    An Australian Brush turkey which we saw.
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve - Hiking / Fig Trees!

    by Jerelis Written Aug 11, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Wingham Brush Nature Reserve is a subtropical floodplain rainforest; typical of the lowland rainforest that once covered much of the Manning River floodplain.

    During our hike we saw the outstanding feature of Wingham Brush Nature Reserve. This feature is the huge Moreton Bay Figs, which are hundreds of years old. It is hard to believe that each of the rainforest giants with their massive buttress roots began life as tiny seed deposited in the fork of a host tree by roosting bird or bat. They grew year by year, to the ground, eventually taking over their host to become some of New South Wales' largest remaining fig trees.

    A huge tree at the nature reserve The hiking trail that leaded us along the Fig Tree
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • ASTIEL's Profile Photo

    THE TERRACE (Tinonee cinema)

    by ASTIEL Updated Jul 10, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of Australia's smallest picture theatres in an historic home. Screening nostalgia films like Dad & Dave, & Casablanca. This little slice of history played host to quite a few nights for my parents and their friends and my grandma lives 2 houses down, dipping back into history for a little taste of what used to be, the olds only ever said good things about this little place, as a kid I watched this place grow from a run down old building to a beautifully restored mini theatre.

    ~ WELL WORTH A LOOK ~

    I think you might need to make a booking to view the place, so I’ve got the phone number and address below...

    Address: 1 Mill Street
    Town/Region: Tinonee
    Post Code: 2430
    State: NSW
    Country: Australia

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ASTIEL's Profile Photo

    The little town of Tinonee

    by ASTIEL Updated Jun 9, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The town of Tinonee is where i was raised, situated 10 minutes west of taree. With nearly nothing there except an old, yet well restored open air theator, a neat little craft store and an aborigional art gallery.

    Life here is very quiet people keep to them selves usually, mind you they are verry friendly too.

    LOOK! you can see my place from here Nice View
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Nice spots to visit!

    by Jerelis Written Dec 29, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nice spots to visit in and around Taree are Fotheringham Park, The Big Oyster, Kiwarrak State Forest, Manning Point, Cundleton and the Visitors Information Centre. The Taree Visitors Centre has a Taree Heritage Walk brochure which is a pleasant walk along the riverbank and around the main streets in the city centre.

    Some of the highlights of the walk include Taree Public School (1902), St. Pauls Church (1869) and Taree Court House (1897).

    The Big Oyster just outside Taree.
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ASTIEL's Profile Photo

    Ellenborough Falls

    by ASTIEL Written Feb 7, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The falls are a spectacular sight as they plunge from plateau level into a vertical walled box gorge 200 metres below. There is a viewing platform just a short distance from the car parking area.

    Ellenborough Falls
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Taree

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

40 travelers online now

Comments

Taree Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Taree off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Taree sightseeing.

View all Taree hotels