Wagga Wagga Favorites

  • A church at Wagga Wagga, Australia
    A church at Wagga Wagga, Australia
    by victorwkf
  • Mural reflecting the aboriginal beginnings
    Mural reflecting the aboriginal...
    by iandsmith
  • Nice house in the suburbs
    Nice house in the suburbs
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Favorites in Wagga Wagga

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The infamous Captain Moonlite

    by iandsmith Written Feb 1, 2012

    Favorite thing: Captain Moonlite, nee Andrew Scott, is the bushranger most often associated with the area. Articulate and well-informed, he was a man with a colourful past having completed a prison sentence in 1879 for a robbery committed while he was acting as a lay preacher at Egerton, near Ballarat.

    Fondest memory: When released from gaol he spoke on the subject of prison reform then roamed the countryside with five young and inexperienced young men who were in dire circumstances. On November 15, 1879, they requested work at Wantabadgery Station, 38 km east of Wagga, but were turned away. They returned and bailed up 39 people at the station.
    Some accounts suggest 'Moonlite' terrorised the household, casting himself in the role of judge and executioner at a 'trial' of three neighbours who were sentenced to hang for carrying arms against the bushrangers. He apparently relented due to the pleas and distress of the women. He seems to have shot at least one horse through the head, allegedly because it reared when he roughly mounted her, although other accounts say he killed several.
    After being alerted by an escaped hostage three policemen duly arrived from Wagga at four in the morning but were forced to retreat under fire. The bushrangers headed off, stopping at McGlede's farmhouse. Meanwhile, police reinforcements from Gundagai and Adelong arrived and a shoot-out ensued in which two of the bushrangers (one aged 15) were killed. One of the troopers died from his wounds six days later.
    The others surrendered (one, Rogan, thought to have escaped, was found hiding under a bed in the McGlede homestead the next day). Scott eloquently and passionately defended himself and endeavoured to protest his innocence but to no avail. After initially being sentenced to death, Thomas Williams and Graham Bennett were granted mercy due to their youth (20 and 19) and the belief that they were led into crime by Scott. They were sentenced instead to hard labour for life. Williams was finally executed in Berrima Gaol in 1885 for stabbing a fellow inmate while Bennett may have spent time in, or even died in, the same gaol.
    Rogan (22) was not spared and he and 'Captain Moonlite' were hanged in 1880 at Darlinghurst Gaol (see entries on Bacchus Marsh and Gundagai for further information on 'Moonlite').

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    Bushrangers and the railway

    by iandsmith Written Feb 1, 2012

    Favorite thing: The Wagga community had several run-ins with bushrangers in the 1860s and 1870s. No less than Wagga police magistrate Henry Baylis was held up by Mad Dan Morgan in 1863 and was shot and wounded when he and some policemen tracked Morgan to his camp. Morgan showed his contempt for the Wagga police when, wanted dead or alive, he managed to attend the Wagga Christmas races in 1864, walking freely among the police, attending the race meeting luncheon and sitting near to the police magistrate without detection.
    The notorious 'Blue Cap' was sentenced to 10 years hard labour at Wagga court in 1868 but was released in a general amnesty in 1874 and strangely never heard from again. James Kelly, younger brother of the famous Ned Kelly, was also sentenced to ten years gaol at Wagga courthouse in 1877 after being convicted of stealing two horses from two Wagga hoteliers. He had just completed four years for cattle theft, a sentence he began serving at the age of 15. When released he then led a respectable life and lived until 1946

    Fondest memory: The railway arrived in North Wagga in 1878 with a 2500-m trestle built across the Murrumbidgee in 1879 to allow the line to continue to South Wagga. The longest railway trestle in NSW, it was extended in 1879 and renewed with steel in 1910.
    The railway station, a picture of which I've misplaced, is arguably the finest building in Wagga and still serves the town today though in a lesser capacity to its heydays.
    The years from 1880-1920 were a period of modest growth after the boom of the 1870s. Large pastoral holdings around the town were broken up for closer settlement. Fruit-growing plus dairying were added to the local economy. The first cinema arrived in 1897 and electricity in 1922. With continuing expansion Wagga was declared a city in 1946.

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    From steamers to semis

    by iandsmith Written Jan 31, 2012
    St Johns Anglican Church where the first one was

    Favorite thing: The site was an important river crossing, situated as it was at the intersection of the north-south track between NSW and Victoria and the east-west track along the Murrumbidgee. Crop farming occurred in 1846. The police building and court premises were established in 1847 and Wagga was achieved town status in 1849. A punt service opened the following year followed in 1851 by the first store opening. Floods slowed development in 1852-53 but, being on the main thoroughfare to the goldfields, Wagga ultimately benefited from the through-traffic becoming an important stock sales centre in the late 1850s.
    The paddle steamers of the inland river system began operations in the 1850s and the first one arrived at Wagga in 1858 but the importance of the road links always made the steamer trade not as competitive and the last steamer came to visit Wagga arrived in 1905.
    The first Anglican church was built in 1860, a school opened in 1861 and a gaol replaced the old lock-up in 1862; prisoners previously being chained to a log while awaiting their hearing.

    Fondest memory: A toll bridge across the river, opened in 1862, was replaced in 1895 by the Hampden Bridge, which is still standing. This helped Wagga to compete with Gundagai and Albury which had prospered as river crossings due to their bridges.

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    More stuff

    by iandsmith Written Jan 31, 2012
    Nice house in the suburbs

    Favorite thing: 'Wagga,' as it is known, is a fully fledged town of fine buildings, tree-lined streets, parks and gardens. The surrounding area consists of properties dedicated to wheat-growing, dairying, mixed farming and fat lambs. It has one of the largest stockyards in Australia, in addition to the Livestock Marketing Centre, which processes around 1.5 million sheep and 130 000 cattle annually.
    The city also boasts the Charles Sturt University and the Riverina Institute of TAFE which adds to its importance as an important regional education centre and, with the Kapooka Army Recruit Training Base and a Royal Australian Air Force base at Forest Hill where I spent a year, it is also regarded as one of the country's major defence force establishments.

    Fondest memory: There was some early pastoral settlement in the 1820s but it was the 1829 exploration of the river system by Charles Sturt and party which opened the area up to settlers, mostly from the more northern Gundagai area. Runs were established on the south and north banks of the Murrumbidgee in 1832 by Robert Best (who owned the Wagga Wagga station and built a homestead there in 1832), and Charles Tompson.

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    A background

    by iandsmith Written Jan 31, 2012
    Mural reflecting the aboriginal beginnings

    Favorite thing: In December 1829, the early colonists first sighted the land on which the flourishing City of Wagga Wagga now stands. The persons thus privileged consisted of Captain Charles Sturt, 39th Regiment, stationed in Sydney, Mr George Macleay and six others. This party passed over the site of future Wagga Wagga on its expedition of discovery down the Murrumbidgee and Murray Rivers. Settlement swiftly followed.
    Wagga Wagga was proclaimed a town in 1849 and in the same year surveyor Thomas Townshend marked out the town. In the 1860s the population totaled approximately 700, but by 1881 it had increased to 3,975. In 1879 the railway line was extended south of the river.

    Fondest memory: The name of the City is derived from the language of the Wiradjuri tribe, which was the biggest aboriginal tribe in New South Wales, embracing the Riverina area.
    "Wagga", "Wahga" or Wahgam" in aboriginal dialect means "crow". The repetition of a word was the method of expressing the plural or emphasis, thus Wagga Wagga means "crows" or "the place where crows assemble in large numbers".
    Many are the jokes about Wagga and crows "Where the crows fly backwards" and "Around and around until they fly up their own posterior" are just two I've heard.
    The Murrumbidgee River which runs through the City also derived its name from the aboriginal language and means "plenty water" or "big water".

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Police Station

    by victorwkf Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    Wagga Wagga Police Station, Australia

    Favorite thing: When I was walking around Wagga Wagga, I came across the police station situated in a historical and interesting building as shown in this photograph. Being a laid-back and peaceful city, I think the jobs of the policemen in Wagga Wagga are probably not so tough :)

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    Historical buildings at Wagga Wagga

    by victorwkf Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    Wagga Wagga, Australia
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: There are a significant number of historical buildings in Wagga Wagga e.g. Court Office, Court House, former CBC Bank. These historical buildings are very well preserved, and most of them are located along the main Baylis Street and surrounding streets, so it is very easy to walk around, admire them and take some photographs.

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    Churches

    by victorwkf Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    A church at Wagga Wagga, Australia

    Favorite thing: When I was at Wagga Wagga, I noticed that this town has several impressive churches in terms of architecture. These churches are located near to the Beach Caravan Park along the Murrumbidgee River. More photographs of these churches are at the travelogue section of this VT page.

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    The main street of Wagga...

    by CandS Updated Sep 8, 2005

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    Baylis Street

    Favorite thing: This is Baylis Street...the main street of Wagga where you will find most of the shops. Baylis Street mostly has retail shops, cafes, department stores, restaurants etc.

    Baylis Street turns into Fitzmaurice Street at the northern end but that end of town is not as busy as Baylis Street...except maybe after dark when the pubs come alive... Fitzmaurice Street is home to mostly businesses like accountants, computer stores, pubs, farm supplies, service stations, produce, furniture etc.

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    National Art Glass Gallery

    by CandS Updated Jul 30, 2004

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    Art Gallery

    Favorite thing: The National Art Glass Gallery is home to the unique National Art Glass Collection. It is part of the Civic Centre complex (cnr Baylis Street and Morrow Street). You can also buy all sorts of glass works at the Glass Shop...

    The gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday & Public Holidays from 12 pm to 4 pm.

    www.waggaartgallery.org
    gallery@wagga.nsw.gov.au
    Phone: 02 69269660

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  • CandS's Profile Photo

    Lake Albert

    by CandS Updated Jul 30, 2004

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    Lake Albert

    Favorite thing: Lake Albert is a man made lake in the suburb of Lake Albert (?!) that is used for bird watching, fishing, sailing, skiing and other water sports. During the warmer months the lake gets a lot of use by the locals.

    It is also a great place for a picnic, remote controlled boats, walking or riding your bike etc...

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    Wagga Wagga Civic Centre

    by CandS Updated Jul 30, 2004

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    Wagga Wagga Civic Centre

    Favorite thing: This is the Wagga Wagga Civic Centre where you'll find the Council staff, Library, Art Gallery & Regional Glass Gallery among other things. The Visitor Information Centre is also just behind the Civic Centre.

    It is located in the main street of Wagga, Baylis Street, near the Wollundry Lagoon...

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    Historic Council Chambers

    by CandS Updated Jul 30, 2004

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    Historic Council Chambers

    Favorite thing: This is the Historic Council Chambers in Wagga Wagga. Inside there are always different exhibitions and displays.

    Most of the displays are travelling exhibitions, they stay a few days/weeks then move on to the next location so there is always something new to see.

    Admission is free. Opening times are: Tuesday to Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 12 pm to 4 pm.

    Phone: 02 69269655

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    Charles Sturt Uni Wine & Cheese Tasting

    by CandS Updated Dec 16, 2003

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    CSU View

    Favorite thing: If you love wine and/or cheese then check out the Charles Sturt University "Cellar Door Wine & Cheese Tasting & Sales".

    There are plenty of wines to choose from and different varieties of cheese...mostly with native flavours...

    It is open Monday to Friday from 11 am to 5 pm, Saturday & Sunday 11 am to 4 pm.

    Phone: 02 69332435
    Email: csuwinery@csu.edu.au
    Web: www.csu.edu.au/winery/

    The CSU Winery is located on McKeown Drive (off Boorooma Street) north of the city of Wagga.

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    Wollundry Lagoon

    by CandS Updated Dec 16, 2003

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    Wollundry Lagoon

    Favorite thing: The Wollundry Lagoon seperates Baylis Street from Fitzmaurice Street (the two major shopping streets in Wagga).

    The Victory Memorial Gardens are just off to the east of the lagoon...it's a great place to stop for a picnic or relax for a while...

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