Boonah Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by balhannah
  • Templin Historic Village
    Templin Historic Village
    by balhannah
  • Templin Historic Village
    Templin Historic Village
    by balhannah

Most Recent Things to Do in Boonah

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    HIGHWAY 90

    by balhannah Updated Mar 14, 2015

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    When at Boonah, make sure you follow Highway 90 which leads to Aratula.

    The scenery along this road is fantastic!

    There is Mount French on the L/H side of the road, and then looking straight ahead, are the Mountains of the Main Range National Park, where the road passes through Cunninghams Gap.

    The Mountains were really blue and so clear on the Winters' day when we last came this way.

    I just can't stop taking photo's of this area, it is so beautiful and is only 90kms approx from Brisbane.

    View of the Main Range on Highway 90 Views from Highway 90 View of Mount French from Highway 90
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    Bottle Trees

    by balhannah Updated Mar 13, 2015

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    Go for a drive around the scenic backroads, and you will see the Queensland "Bottle Trees," native to Australia.
    The botanical name of the tree is "Brachychiton rupestris," much easier to call it a "Bottle" tree, and most people living in Australia know what one looks like. The name came about, as the trunk of the tree looks like a bottle. The trees take a long time to grow, taking 5 - 8 years to form a shape of a bottle, can reach 2 metres in diameter and grow perhaps 20 metres maximum. The tree will drop its leaves between the months of October and December before it flowers.

    The species is only found in Central Queensland through to northern New South Wales.
    In the tree trunk, water is stored between the inner bark and the trunk, the seeds, roots, stems, and bark can be eaten, and the fibrous inner bark used to make twine or rope and even woven together to make fishing nets.

    Bottle tree
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    Drive the streets of Boonah

    by balhannah Updated Oct 11, 2014

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    As Boonah was settled in the 1880s, it is a good town to see the styles of homes from that era. There are many of them, most have been painted and a lot restored, so it is really worth having a drive around the streets and a walk on along the main street.
    I say drive, as Boonah is situated on some hills and unless your fit, you may find the going tough!

    I think the older style wooden 'Queenslander Homes' are beautiful!

    Queensland home Dugandan Hotel, corner of road to Mount French Queensland home Hotel in main street
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    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

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    FLYING FOXES

    by balhannah Updated Oct 4, 2014

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    UPDATE: Unfortunately, all the trees where the Flying Foxes lived have been removed. This came about because of the extreme noise, the smell and the large amount of feces on the ground.
    This area became a health hazard.

    There are over 60 different kinds in Australia, most of them feed on insects, but 8 feed only on flowers and fruit, and are known as fruit-bats or flying-foxes. Four of these are amongst the world's largest bats and may weigh up to one kilogram and their wings may span more than a metre.

    Behind the Boonah Information centre, the Flying foxes have made the Trees their camp, gathering here during the day in their hundreds. I have seen them in this location for many years. You can walk quite close to the Trees, before some of them become a little scared of a human and take flight.

    Boonah Boonah Boonah
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    TEMPLIN HISTORICAL VILLAGE

    by balhannah Written Oct 11, 2012

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    TEMPLIN Historical Village is easy to find, as it is located alongside the main road.

    This is a rural museum which contains 14 historic buildings, each one displaying local artifacts. Fashions of the 1900s, some of these have been back in fashion! What about the old heavy irons, the meat safes, cameras, [thankgoodness we have digital now!] medical and war memorabilia. Templin is a farming community, where milk, vegetables, grain and meat for local, national and international markets was and is still produced. The old Dairy farm displays wooden butter boxes and an early separator.
    The Slab hut dates to 1879, and was built by a husband for his wife and 7 children to live in, and the Church of England, built in 1911 for a cost of 75 pounds.

    Since 1977, all of this is located in the old Queensland State School grounds.

    OPEN......Sun 9.30am-3.30pm, Thursday... 9.30am-12pm
    ADMISSION..... $7 for adults, $3 for children and $15 for families.

    Templin Historic Village Templin Historic Village Templin Historic Village
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Bunjurgen Estate Vineyard

    by stevemt Updated Dec 7, 2008

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    This is a really delightful place to visit. David (the owner) is a wonderful host and has provided picnic tables dotted around the estate for visitors to use. The views here are beautiful, the climate nice, the wine tastings fantastic, and the wine is also for sale.

    The estate dog (a giant alaskan malamute) is friendly as well.

    There is ample parking

    Entrance sign The cellar. David (mine host) is on the left The vines The view De harvest in the making
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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Wine Tasting

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    Wine tour

    by stevemt Written Feb 17, 2008

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    There are numerous little vinyards in the Boonah area. These botique vinyards are generally small, managed by 1 person or family. The predominent grape type is red.

    I had a great time this year picking the Shiraz harvest at the "Bunjurgen Estate" out on the Boonah Rathdowney rd.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Wine Tasting

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    Cunningham's Gap

    by iandsmith Written Jun 24, 2006

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    Mt French National Park
    The Boonah Shire has a number of places to indulge in a favourite Aussie pastime, bushwalking. There is Mount French National Park not far from the town. The climb to the top of Mount French is rewarded by excellent panoramic views over the Fassifern Valley. It is part of the 676-hectare Moogerah Peaks National Park which includes a number of volcanic peaks and rocky cliffs to the west of the town. Mt Moon, Mt Edwards and Mt Greville are the more isolated areas of the park and are suitable for experienced bushwalkers.
    Main Range National Park
    To the west of Boonah, back in the direction of Brisbane, lies the Main Range National Park with its famous Cunningham's Gap, named after one of Australia's better known early European explorers whose Christian name was Allan. This happened in 1827. He foresaw that this would be the access route joining the rich rural area to the coast and made the journey to prove his point.

    Looking across the gap The lovely walks Dramatic scenes beyond the trees
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    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    Architecturally speaking

    by iandsmith Written Jun 24, 2006

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    There's not a lot to get excited about on the architectural front here but it does have its moments. Some of the streets are unusually narrow by rural standards which gives a comfortable community air to the town.
    The larger Boonah Shire covers an area of 1904 square kilometres and has a total population exceeding 9,000.
    Originally known, rather unromantically, as the Goolman Division Board, it suffered a name change in 1937. Boonah, an Anglicised version of the Aboriginal word 'buna', supposedly means bloodwood tree.

    Detail of awnings in the main street
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    • Architecture
    • Seniors

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    One in every town

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 24, 2006

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    In early gold rush towns, the significance of the place was often gauged by the number of pubs that sprung up to satisfy thirsty miners. In rural towns the numbers were significantly less. Perhaps there's a moral there somewhere though momentarily it escapes me.
    In many towns there are three or four names that regularly crop up, "Royal, Railway and Commercial" are three that spring readily to mind.
    This is and example of the latter though obviously the licensee has a sense of humour as evidenced by the sight of these store dummies decked out on the balcony of this two storey establishment.

    Ashen faced locals
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    • Beer Tasting
    • Seniors
    • Road Trip

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    Rural life

    by iandsmith Written Jun 24, 2006

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    I loved it. Walking down the main street of rural Boonah, well over an hour west of Brisbane, I came across a familiar sight - chooks. Or, as the rest of the world may call them, chickens or such.
    It brought back memories of my upbringing and our yard that always had chooks and we always had fresh meat if we needed it.
    Yes, it was obvious I was in a country town and you can't help but get that nice relaxed feeling, especially after we had just enjoyed an al fresco cup of tea in the shop across the road.

    Don't you just love it!
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Arts and Culture
    • Birdwatching

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