King George Square, Brisbane

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  • King George Square
    by balhannah
  • King George Square
    by balhannah
  • Petrie Sculpture
    Petrie Sculpture
    by balhannah
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE PETRIE TABLEAU SCULPTURE

    by balhannah Updated Feb 16, 2013

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    Petrie Sculpture
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    STOP 5 ON THE CULTURAL HERITAGE PUBLIC ART TRAIL

    The Petrie Tableau Sculpture is in honor of an early Queensland explorer, Andrew Petrie. It's a sculpture I like, and so do the Tourist's, as they can stand infront between the two sculpted kangaroo's.
    It was commissioned and created in 1988 as a way to acknowledge the pioneer families of Brisbane. Initially known as the Brisbane City Bicentennial Statue. Once again, a competition was held. After public debate, this was the chosen sculpture.

    The sculpture depicts Brisbane’s pioneering Petrie family in 1842. There is Andrew Petrie mounted on a horse farewelling his wife and family, whilst his eldest son steadies the horse. Another son plays with Aboriginal children and a freed convict maid. The Petrie family were the first free settlers in the Moreton Bay Penal Colony. After the closure of the penal settlement, the Petrie family remained in Queensland and played an integral role in the design and construction of many of Brisbane’s earliest buildings.
    Both Andrew and John were explorers throughout South East Queensland. John Petrie was elected Brisbane’s first mayor in 1859 and held the position until 1862.

    If you would like to see the area they came from and the old buildings, please click on this link
    PETRIE

    It really is a lovely village to go and visit, and can be reached by public transport. A free Museum is next door. On weekends, a market is held in the historic buildings.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    KING GEORGE MEMORIAL & LIONS

    by balhannah Updated Feb 16, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    STOP 3/4 ON THE CULTURAL HERITAGE PUBLIC ART TRAIL

    This is the imposing bronze figure of King George V sitting astride a beautiful horse. Once, the 2 Lions were on either side, but now they are near the main entrance to City Hall.

    This statue is the result of an Australia-wide competition. Originally the King stood on a central pillar, flanked by the lions which faced to the sides.
    Queen Elizabeth II asked during a visit to Brisbane, “Why is Grandpapa retreating?”
    This was because the King originally faced City Hall, so after her question, he was turned around so he was leading his subjects to battle.

    The pair of Lions are lying down with their head's raised. They are here because they symbolize
    bravery, valour, strength and royalty. The lion is also recognised as a national symbol of the British people.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    King George Square - The City Hall.

    by Jerelis Written Jul 29, 2005

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    The solemny City Halls faces the King George Sq.

    The City Hall itself is an interesting example of an attempt to use English neo-classical architecture in a modern building. It uses Queensland brown-tinted freestone, marble, sandstone and timbers. The scale is impressive and full of old world charm. The main foyer inside King George Square, for example, uses ornate high vaulted ceilings, floor mosaics, and crafted timber and plasterwork to great effect.

    There is also a huge 16 m sculpture depicting Queensland protecting her citizens. The clock town, an amazing Italian renaissance number with rises 91 m above the City Plaza, provides excellent panoramic views of the city.

    There are two churches facing the square. One of them is the Albert Street Uniting Church. This particular red sandstone building is made in 1889.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    King George Square - City's focal point

    by Jerelis Written Jul 29, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Albert Street Uniting Church at the dege of the sq

    King George Square, located at the front of City Hall, is the city's focal point. Enhanced with monumental sculptures and fountains, it provides a vast public space, frequently used for special presentations, civic events and by community groups.

    One of the monumental sculptures is the City Hall which is one of Brisbane's most recognisable landmarks, and gives visitors a great view of the surrounding business district and beyond. It is the second of three town halls built in Brisbane, and was home to Brisbane Council between 1930 and the 1980s. When the Council moved for the last time, they vowed to return this beautiful Classical Revival cum Art Deco building to the people. The City Hall itself is an interesting example of an attempt to use English neo-classical architecture in a modern building. It uses Queensland brown-tinted freestone, marble, sandstone and timbers.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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