Carnarvon National Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Those pebbles were where you cross
    Those pebbles were where you cross
    by iandsmith
  • Man of no fixed abode at crossing 21
    Man of no fixed abode at crossing 21
    by iandsmith
  • See those pebbles holding back the water?
    See those pebbles holding back the...
    by iandsmith

Best Rated Warnings and Dangers in Carnarvon National Park

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    WALKING LEVELS

    by balhannah Written Jun 29, 2010

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    Hiking tracks

    A lot of our Australian National Parks, give you numbers that refer to how hard a walk is.
    This is good, as only YOU know your level of fitness, so if you see a Level 4 walk that you wish to do, but are very unfit, then you will need to give this a pass!

    So here is our Australian bushwalking tracks are classified.
    Class 2 track
    Easy, level, well-graded track, suitable for all fitness levels.

    Class 3 track
    Gently sloping, well-defined track, usually with slight inclines or few to many steps.
    Steep sections occur.
    Caution needed on creek crossings, ladders and steps.
    Reasonable level of fitness and ankle-supporting footwear required

    Class 4 track
    May be extensively overgrown, may be fallen trees over the track and rocks likely to be present.
    Caution needed on creek crossings, cliff edges and naturally-occurring lookouts.
    Moderate level of fitness required.
    Ankle-supporting footwear strongly recommended.

    Dress correctly, with hiking boots or good walking shoes, take water, wear a Hat, and you should be ok. Have a good time, I do, I love hiking!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FATAL FRUITS

    by balhannah Written Jun 29, 2010

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    Cycad nuts

    When walking the trails, we saw heaps and heaps of beautiful Cycads growing, they were tremendous.. These are the ancient zamia cycad, Macrozamia Moorei, and they are EXTREMELY POISONOUS, AND CANCER PRODUCING in their natural state.
    Guess what, Aboriginal people found a way to eat them!

    Large quantities of the cooked Nutshells were found in Cathedral Cave, confirming that this plant, although toxic, was an important source of food for the Aboriginal people living here.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Brisvegaskid's Profile Photo

    No Fuel on Site!!

    by Brisvegaskid Written Jan 4, 2007

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    There is no fuel at Carnarvon Gorge or locally - so make sure you have enough one way or another. Also - bring your own everything. There is only very expensive essentials on site at the camp ground. They do have drinking water.

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    The crossings

    by iandsmith Written Jul 19, 2012

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    Man of no fixed abode at crossing 21
    3 more images

    If you are unsure on your feet, you should be warned that there are 21 creek crossing over rocks, not every one stable, and, guess what, there are 21 on the way back as well!
    This will tire your legs and you may get wet if the creek is running. I am fortunate enough to have waterproof shoes but everyone else I saw had wet feet and socks etc.
    A lot of the time the creek will have little water in it but it was a moist winter when I was there.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Seniors

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Carnarvon National Park Warnings and Dangers

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