Mount Barney National Park Travel Guide

  • The area is seriously rugged
    The area is seriously rugged
    by iandsmith
  • Mt. Barney
    Mt. Barney
    by balhannah
  • Mt. Lindesay
    Mt. Lindesay
    by balhannah

Mount Barney National Park Things to Do

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    by iandsmith Written Aug 25, 2014

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    Mount Barney National Park has special significance to Aboriginal groups who have legends and stories to explain their connection with the mountains. For many it is taboo to climb Mount Barney. One story tells of an ill-fated plot by a jealous uncle to murder his nephew because it was the nephew, not the uncle, who was to inherit the role of head tribesman. Outwitted by his nephew, it is the uncle that is murdered. Upon discovering the true story of the uncle's intentions and death, the elders placed a curse on the mountain so no further murders could occur. This forbade all kinship groups from climbing the mountain. Today the mountain is still respected by these kinship groups—always from a distance and never climbed.
    Personally, I find conquering a mountain is a westerner thing. I note that sherpas would never climb Everest until money became involved, Denali in North America wasn't climbed by natives and Uluru in Australia was never summited by the indigenous population. It seems that the original locals prefer to respect and live in harmony.
    On a frosty August morning in 1828, the commandant of the Brisbane settlement, Captain Patrick Logan, and botanists Alan Cunningham and Charles Fraser set out from their camp to climb Mount Barney. This was the first recorded European ascent of the mountain. Fraser's journal graphically recounts the climb, describing the perils the group encountered. Logan was the only one to complete the climb to the summit, leaving both Cunningham and Fraser to turn back after finding the ascent too difficult.
    It was during these early expeditions into the mountainous area of the scenic rim that many of the peaks were given European names. Mount Barney, Mount Lindesay and Mount Clunie were named after prominent engineers or soldiers of the early 1800s, while Mount Ballow took its name from David Ballow, a Moreton Bay Government Medical Officer who died of typhus while caring for immigrants under quarantine at Dunwich in 1850. Some names were abbreviated from Aboriginal names; Mount Maroon was originally known as 'Wahlmoorum' (Yuggera language meaning 'sand goanna').

    Mount Barney (mostly obscured by cloud) Road to Mount Barney NP
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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    by iandsmith Written Aug 25, 2014

    Mount Lindesay is a stark peak, a remnant of lava flows from the nearby Focal Peak shield volcano.

    The mountain is a standout due to its shape, even dramatic from over the border in Queensland' approximately 140 km south west of Brisbane. Mount Lindesay is part of the Mount Barney National Park in Queensland and the Border Ranges National Park in New South Wales. They're sort of part of the same deal.
    Most of the peak is covered in dense rainforest and the summit is often under cloud cover.
    If you have a desire to scale the heights, it's rated 6-7 which is very high. Rarely have I ever gone over 5.
    In December 1928, Mount Lindesay was possibly the site of the first known recreational climbing fatality in Australia, when a man named Lyle Vidler fell to his death whilst attempting a solo ascent of Vidler's Chimney. He is buried in a grave in the rainforest, not far from where he fell. On the 19 June 2011 Ross Miller, one of a party of six, fell to his death while climbing in a designated area.
    The smart thing to do here would be to take an epirb and to detail your route to someone else before you leave...just in case.

    Mount Lindesay
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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    by balhannah Written Apr 6, 2012

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    Mount Lindesay, once seen, never forgotten because of its unusual tiered summit, the remnant of lava flows from the nearby Focal Peak shield volcano.

    The mountain lies on the Queensland-New South Wales border, approximately 140 km south west of Brisbane. Mount Lindesay is situated within the Mount Barney National Park in Queensland and the Border Ranges National Park in New South Wales. Most of the peak is covered in dense rainforest, and the summit is often under cloud cover. Mount Lindesay is significant to the local Githabul people.

    There is only one steep and exposed route to the summit, rated at approximately grade 6-7, which starts at the south east corner of the upper cliffs, not a decent track and should only be attempted if you have basic rock-climbing and abseiling skills, or be under the guidance of experienced rock-climbers.

    In December 1928, Mount Lindesay was the site of the first known recreational climbing fatality in Australia, when Lyle Vidler fell to his death whilst attempting a solo ascent of Vidler's Chimney. He is buried in a grave in the rainforest, not far from where he fell. On the 19 June 2011 Ross Miller, one of a party of six, fell to his death while climbing in a designated area.

    It's for this reason, that you should leave your name, address, number of people in your party, ages and any medical conditions, vehicle registration, make, model, colour and parking location,
    the route you are taking, expected times of departure and return with somebody, then if you do not return, a search party can come looking. Better to be safe than sorry!

    The Mount Lindesay Highway passes to the western side of Mount Lindesay.

    Mt. Lindesay Mt. Lindesay Mt. Lindesay Mt. Lindesay Mt. Lindesay
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    • Mountain Climbing
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Mount Barney National Park Warnings and Dangers

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    by iandsmith Written Aug 25, 2014

    Mount Barney National Park offers some of the most spectacular remote area bushwalking opportunities in the Scenic Rim area. The extremely rugged mountain terrain can be hazardous for inexperienced or poorly prepared walkers.
    Walkers should familiarise themselves with the area before attempting an extended walk.
    Bushwalkers must:
    •have a high level of physical fitness, navigational and cliff scrambling skills and bush sense, and
    •be well prepared.
    Established bushwalking clubs with experienced off-track walkers organise trips to Mount Barney National Park. Guidebooks covering most walks are available from specialist camping stores and some bookshops.
    Remote area walking is only advised in the cooler weather, usually April to September. Walking during summer can be very hazardous due to high temperatures and lack of surface water.
    All remote bushwalkers are expected to follow the minimal impact bushwalking and bush camping practices, such as observing proper sanitation and hygiene methods and avoiding polluting water in any way.
    Contact National Parks for assistance with route advice and other detailed information.

    The area is seriously rugged
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Mount Barney National Park Favorites

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    by iandsmith Written Aug 25, 2014

    Favorite thing: The outrider peaks stood stark before the misty soft white doona that enveloped the otherwise commanding Mount Barney. The reason for the area not being farmed was clearly evident in the ruggedness of the facade, a veritable rock climbers’ delight.
    The walk was underwhelming; one gully succeeded another and I longed for some sign of the promised gorge. Continually negotiating exposed tree roots and stranded rocks meant there was no respite from the varied terrain. Most of the trees were straight, which surprised me given the seemingly poor nature of the soil and the variance of the weather.
    Yet another gully, then another until, at last, a sound rent the air; sounded like a large waterfall. There are few sounds in life that lift the spirits like rushing water; hopefully the gorge wasn’t far away.
    Not long after I reached the thrashing stream where the water bounced off one rock after the other, creating the roar I’d heard earlier. It had been written somewhere that you don’t stop here. No, you have to cross the stream.

    Fondest memory: Though I looked up and down the waters there was no easy crossing so I removed the lower part of my trousers after divesting myself of shoes and socks. The water, though bracing, only caused problems because of the force and at one spot it was upper thigh deep. Maintaining footing due to the flow was a brief, if disconcerting, issue and soon I was across and heading west.
    It’s only a few hundred metres further on before you come to the original Lower Portals camp site, my goal for the day. I saw a lesser used track heading steeply away from the camp and decided to take a little longer in the region.
    It’s only about 4 minutes to the top but I had to stop three times en route to gather my breath. As I rolled across the top I was glad I had made the extra effort. Here the mountains were seen at their majestic best, part bare buttresses, part cloaked in hardy vegetation, all the way to the raging waters that echoed around the granophyre rocks.

    The creek crossing On the Lower Portals track The shrouded peaks Top of the climb The river at lower portals
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