Native Fauna, Adelaide

8 Reviews

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  • Road sign of penguins.
    Road sign of penguins.
    by a5floor
  • Native Fauna
    by hennanights
  • Native Fauna
    by hennanights
  • hennanights's Profile Photo

    Black and red swimming swans (Cygnus atratus)

    by hennanights Written Dec 12, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Favorite thing: Elder park in the city centre is home to Adelaide's beautiful black swans who spend their days swimming back and forth in the river Torrens. These elegant birds are very use to living with people and will often come to the sides of the bank to check you out. Unfortunately they do this in the hopes of receiving food but try to resist the temptation to feed them as its quite harmful to them and can even cause their death. Better to snap a few photos and enjoy the few minutes you have up close until they figure out their not getting a free lunch today.
    Black swans are found throughout Australia.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Kookaburra sit in a gum tree

    by hennanights Updated Oct 27, 2006

    Favorite thing: Snapped this pic of a Kookaburra in a small park opposite a shopping mall. Made famous by their contagious laugh, which they use to mark their territory, they are an Aussie icon. They are a member on the kingfisher family and are the largest of their kind. Their diet consists of mostly insects but they do hunt for small birds, rodents and reptiles.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

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    SA Magie

    by hennanights Updated Aug 28, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Favorite thing: The magpie is considered a bit of a larrikin. They have been known to steal items, especially things that glitter. They add these treasures to their nest which they defend with gusto, swooping down on passing bye pedestrians. In spring its a common site to see people running waving their arms above their heads to ward them off. However the majority of the time they are quite shy and will not bother you. The magpie's loud musical flute like song called the warble. They can be heard at dawn singing which is lovely.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Birdwatching

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    Nesting Rainbow Lorikeets

    by hennanights Written Aug 19, 2006
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    Favorite thing: Rainbow lorikeets nest in the hallows of gum trees. About 80 ft above the ground. The eggs of the Rainbow Lorikeet are laid on chewed, decayed wood. They compete with other parrots, particularly with rosellas, for nest sites. They are a very aggressive bird and invariably win. Both sexes prepare the nest cavity and feed the young, but only the female incubates the eggs. Their young leave the nesting hollow for the first time after 7-8 weeks but return to the nest to roost for a short time. Afterwards the young bird will join other unmated birds in the communal roost so that the parents can have new babies. After two years these young birds have reached sexual maturity and will in turn find a mate and have a family of their own. They can live for about 20 years.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Birdwatching

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    Lovely Rainbow lorikeets

    by hennanights Written Aug 19, 2006
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    Favorite thing: Rainbow lorikeets live in most Australian forests and woodlands and they like to visit cities, gardens and park lands. These lovely little birds are normally seen in groups of 10 or so forging for food on the floor although they are more at home in the trees. In the trees they can group in the high numbers of around 1000. They are blossom-feeders, eating the nectar and pollen, as well as fruit, leaf buds and insects on the trees. They have small hairs on their tongues which the pollen sticks to. When you disturb them they can be quite vocal in letting you know. The produce a high squawk which insights them all to join in. They also constantly chatter to one another when moving around. They give the impression of being naughty and belligerent. But they are loyal often pairing for life.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Rosella Parrots

    by hennanights Written Jul 6, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Australia has 54 species of parrots. The Eastern Rosella parrots are found throughout South Australia. They travel in small groups. Its is not known whether the birds are native to the area or whether they have appeared through release. Quite often they are spotted while noisily, with a loud chirps, fly from tree to tree but every now and then you will spot them on the ground foraging for seeds. They supplement their diet with fruit stolen from backyard orchards. The birds are quite playful and you can often hear them chirping to each other. Males have longer bills than females.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    Road sign of penguins.

    by a5floor Updated Jan 7, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Road sign of penguins.

    Favorite thing: At Granite Island you will find this road sign. I haven't seen any penguins, but apparently they are there.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Pee with feathered friends

    by hennanights Written Aug 29, 2006
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    Favorite thing: I love the toilets at the zoo! They are built into the parrot cages with part of the ceiling being mesh so the birds look down on you. Only fair after you have been looking at them all day!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Zoo

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