City Architecture, Adelaide

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  • St. Marks College
    St. Marks College
    by balhannah
  • East Terrace
    East Terrace
    by balhannah
  • East Terrace
    East Terrace
    by balhannah
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    ADELAIDE ARCADE

    by balhannah Updated Mar 27, 2014

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    Adelaide Arcade Entrance
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    After viewing the Fountain, it was time for a walk through the Adelaide Arcade.

    First, a look at the outside of the building, only just been re-painted, wow! lovely! The facade is built in Italian Revival style, has pretty lacework and the Coat of Arms. Built in 1885, at that time it was considered a very modern building.
    The 50 shop fronts had large windows, there were roof skylights, and it was also one of the first retail establishment's in Australia to have electric lights. It only took 5 months to build. To me, it has that "rich" feel, the dark wood and the Marble make a wonderful combination!

    I think this is a lovely arcade to wander through, I love the lighting and the dark brown wood. Upstairs, it is still the same, but the ground floor has changed a little. I usually window shop, as the stores here are more expensive. Every time I see the "Button Bar," a small shop full of thousands of buttons, I wonder how it survives the big rental when selling only buttons, but it does!

    Guess What! The Adelaide Arcade is believed to own a resident ghost!
    A poor caretaker,named "Francis Cluney," had his head mutilated in the electricity generator in the 1900's. The newspaper report of the time was quite graphic in every detail.
    Have you seen or heard sightings, strange footsteps, objects being moved from where they belong, and other strange phenomena which cannot be explained. It's believed there is not one, but 6 Ghost's in the Arcade!

    Lucky it closes at night.
    You can enter either from Rundle Mall or Pulteney Street.

    OPEN...Monday - Thursday 9 - 7 PM.....Friday 9-9 PM ... SAT...9-5PM ...SUN..11-5PM.

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    EAST TERRACE - ADELAIDE

    by balhannah Written Jul 15, 2012

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    East Terrace
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    East Terrace marks the eastern edge of the city centre of Adelaide, but unlike Adelaide's other three terraces, its path is not a straight line, but a rather crooked one. You can either walk or drive like we did, stopping along the way to take photo's of the beautiful old buildings that line the Terrace.

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    EAST END MARKETS

    by balhannah Written Jul 15, 2012

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    Located at the eastern end of Rundle Street, is the site of Adelaide's original fruit and vegetable wholesale markets. These closed in the 1980s, and now are apartment blocks.

    The East End Markets were established in 1867. By the 1890's, there was such competition for stalls that a new site was needed. A proprietor of a fruit, potato and grocery store, purchased land between Rundle Street and Grenfell Street with the plan of extending the existing, however, this didn't eventuate, and he established a new rival market, the Adelaide Fruit and Produce Exchange, on that site. It began trading in 1904 and closed in 1988.

    Thank goodness, the original decorative facades with their ornate gables and cornucopia motifs have been retained.

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    CARCLEW

    by balhannah Written Jul 15, 2012

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    Carclew Youth Arts Centre

    Carclew House is a beautiful building that was once a private home. In 1965, the Adelaide City Council bought it, and it became a centre that would be a place for multi-arts activity for young people up to the age of 17 years, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    It was named "Carclew Youth Arts Centre"

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    PARLIAMENT HOUSE

    by balhannah Updated Jul 15, 2012

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    Parliament House

    I think Parliament House in Adelaide looks a very strong imposing building! All those grey columns on the building makes it very impressive! It was buillt in Victorian Academic Classical style in two stages:- between 1883-89 and 1936-37.

    A 40-minute guided tour includes both the Upper and Lower Parliamentary Chambers, as well as working areas of the building.

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    NORTH ADELAIDE FOR HISTORIC MANSIONS

    by balhannah Written Jul 15, 2012

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    Pennington Terrace Mansion
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    After viewing "Light's Vision," I went for a walk along Pennington Terrace until I reached St. Peter's Cathedral. Along here are statues and many impressive houses.
    You can also start from Light's Vision, then walk to Brougham Place seeing the Mansions there. Palmer Place is also well known for their large mansions including Christ Church and Bishop's Court, which date from the early 1850s. Great views over the city too!

    The walk takes about 1.5hours.
    Brochures are available from the Adelaide City Council Customer Centre, 25 Pirie Street, Adelaide.

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    ST. MARKS COLLEGE @ NORTH ADELAIDE

    by balhannah Written Jul 15, 2012

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    St. Marks College
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    St Mark's College is affiliated with the Anglican church and is a co-residential college. It is another architecturally beautiful University buildilng.
    St Mark's all boys College, came about as there was no student accommodation at the University of Adelaide. At the time, it was known as Downer House, then St. Marks bought the house, and it became St. Marks College. At this time, it was used to accommodate a single, or temporarily detached married Master, 12 tutors and students, a cook-housekeeper and 2/3 maids.

    In December 1940, the College was leased to the RAAF for the duration of the war. Following the conclusion of the war, the college re-opened on 10 March 1946.
    Women were first admitted to the college in 1982.

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    ADELAIDE GENERAL POST OFFICE [GPO]

    by balhannah Written Jul 13, 2012

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    GPO

    The GPO is a beautiful heritage building, built in Victorian Free Classical style. It has been in the same location since 1851.
    The present building was constructed between 1867-72, with the Clock, Bell's and dial facings installed in 1875. Back then, it was both a post office and a telegraph station.
    The GPO is a major feature of the streetscape in King William Street and, with the Town Hall opposite, provides an impressive sight of twin towers.

    OPEN - 8.30 - 5.30PM Monday - Friday

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    OLD TREASURY BUILDING [MEDINA HOTEL]

    by balhannah Updated Jul 13, 2012

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    The Old Treasury
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    I'm so glad this famous old Treasury Building has been renovated and given a good home.

    The Adelaide Treasury building is one of the oldest and most historically significant buildings in South Australia.
    This gorgeous building was designed in 1836 by George Strickland Kingston, but the foundation stone wasn't laid until 1839 by Governor Gawler.
    At the same time, the Governor proclaimed that Adelaide would be the site of the capital city, finally laying to rest, much rumour and controversy as to where the capital would be located.

    Lots of important historic events have taken place here.

    Australia’s first gold coin, the Adelaide pound, was minted on site during the 1850s Gold Rush, and it was because of this Gold rush, the old Treasury building was demolished and rebuilt creating the building we see today.
    The Beef Riots of the 1930s, when demonstrations rallied against the exclusion of beef from rations took place at the Treasury site during the depression.
    In 1863, explorer John McDouall Stuart was welcomed in front of the building after crossing Australia, and Explorer Captain Charles Stuart worked in the Treasury as a surveyor.
    George Goyder, another surveyor, established the famous Goyder’s line and Robert Torrens, developed the land title systems that were widely adopted around the world, worked here.
    From 1876 to 1968 Members of the Premier’s Cabinet met in the Cabinet Room.
    Sir Thomas Playford, South Australia's most favorite Premier, ran the state from the Treasury for 26 years.

    Last but not least, when the Beatles [pop group] came to Australia in 1964, they found themselves amongst thousands of fans. A way of escaping the fans was to make a mad dash through the Treasury courtyard.

    Underneath the Treasury building are underground tunnels, mostly used in the 1960’s.

    Now this beautiful building is the "Medina Apartment's Hotel." In the lobby is a permanent display of artefacts found during renovations, including glassware, bone handles from cutlery, coins and much more.

    Meals are available...BREAKFAST 7-10 am (Monday - Friday & 8:00am - 11:00am ( Weekends)
    Lunch...12:00 - 2:30 (Monday - Friday)
    Dinner...6 - 9pm (Monday - Friday) 6:00pm - 9:30pm (Saturday)

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    THE OTHER SIDE OF NORTH TERRACE

    by balhannah Updated Jul 12, 2012

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    North Terrace
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    Often when walking and visiting fantastic old buildings, you tend to forget to look across the other side of the road.
    North Terrace is such road. It has lots to see on one side, and if you do remember to look on the other side, you will find many sandstone buildings with all types of beautiful architecture.

    Ayers House is on the other side and is considered to be one of the finest examples of Colonial Regency architecture in Australia.

    In 1871 Henry Ayers purchased the property for 400 pounds, then gradually enlarged the small house in stages, beginning in 1858 with the addition of library (still named the Library), bedrooms (now the Henry Ayers Room) and a ballroom (still named as the Ballroom) which was completed in 1860. In 1862 the ballroom was decorated with intricate designs in gold leaf, while chandeliers were hung from two ornate ceiling roses. The Ballroom is completely restored to its former glory.
    Quite a few Weddings and Receptions are held at Ayer's House.

    It was a pity, but Ayer's House was being renovated, so was closed to the public.
    The Ayers House Museum takes you on guided tours of the house every half hour and hour during museum opening hours and last for about an hour.
    Entry into the house is only permitted on a guided tour. The historic museum is split over three levels of the house including the basement, ground floor and first floor. It's a chance to see a collection of antique furniture, silver, paintings and costumes.

    ADMISSION IN 2012....Adult: $10.00...Concession: $8.00.. Child 13-16: $5.00
    Child 12 & Under: FREE
    OPEN.... Tuesday - Friday 10:00am - 4:00pm....Weekends & Public Holidays 1:00pm - 4:00pm

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    MITCHELL BUILDING

    by balhannah Written Jul 12, 2012

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    Mitchell building
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    Mitchell building is another that belongs to the S.A. University. It was built in 1879, and was the first building on the University of Adelaide's North Terrace Campus.
    It is built in the gothic style, has a grand staircase and stained-glass windows. To me, it looks a little like a Church.

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    ELDER HALL

    by balhannah Written Jul 12, 2012

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    Elder Hall

    Thomas Elder was a famous South Australian who gave £20,000 to the Adelaide University, making the total he had donated to the University, £100.000.
    The first stone of Elder Hall was laid in 1898, and the building was opened two years later.
    It is now home to the oldest tertiary music school in Australia, the Elder Conservatorium of Music.

    At the front of Elder Hall, stands the Statue of Thomas Elder.

    At the moment [2012], fundraising is taking place, as it's in dire need of renovation.

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    BROOKMAN BUILDING

    by balhannah Updated Jul 12, 2012

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    Brookman building

    Brookman building is part of the University of S.A.
    Another imposing building on North Terrace, this one built in Federation-Gothic style and made of local bluestone and bricks.
    In 1903, it was used as a preparatory school for students entering the School of Mines as they had been found to be ill-prepared for study. In 1914 this became the Junior Technical School which then changed its name in 1918 to Adelaide Technical High School.
    In 1963 Adelaide Technical High School moved so the University of South Australia took the building over.

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    Pick up a free map and take a walk

    by Gentleman75 Updated Oct 28, 2010

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    Pick up a free "Adelaide & Suburbs" map at the airport or in any tourist information office. There is a "3 hour city walk and arcades map" in it with 21 highlight tourist spots (churches, historical buildings, museums, galleries, botanic garden etc).

    Check my photos about the City

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    Here the same street (i Hope).

    by Alphons Updated Dec 7, 2004

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    Here the same street (i Hope).

    Here the same street (i Hope), the traffic in Adelaide is very busy and very noicy. The drivers like it by the traffic lights to do if there is a Formule 1 start comming, and yes green start, ieeeeeeeeeeeeee with a lot of spinning weels the Adelaide drivers are goiing to........ the next traffic light :-(.

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