Clare Off The Beaten Path

  • Chapel Chess Set
    Chapel Chess Set
    by balhannah
  • Farrell Flat Hotel
    Farrell Flat Hotel
    by balhannah
  • Pikes Winery
    Pikes Winery
    by balhannah

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Clare

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    BLYTH HERITAGE FENCE

    by balhannah Updated Jul 5, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We came through the small town of Blyth on our way to Clare. Blyth only has a population of approx 350 people, some of them must be quite clever, as they came up with making a Heritage fence to attract tourists.

    The fencing surrounds Padnaindi Reserve, where a playground for children and a picnic area is located.

    Sixteen laser cut panels, which depict the historical way of life of both Blyth farmers and the community surround the Reserve. The design of each panel was taken from a photo, then ideas were added, this took between 15 - 20 hours for each panel, then it was passed onto the laser cutting company, "Ferrocut," who produced the final article. I was very impressed!
    In the shelter shed, is a description of each panel and the photo, and then the finished project.
    DO NOT MISS THIS.
    The project was a community effort, with residents helping to erect the panels over several working bees.

    These Panels are outstanding, and if you are in Blyth, they are a MUST SEE

    LOCATED...13kms from Clare

    Blyth Blyth Blyth Blyth Blyth
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FARRELL FLATS MAIN STREET

    by balhannah Written Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We were on our way to Burra, so a stop was made at Farrell Flat to see the old town, and to find Toilets.

    We found the Toilets, a brand new building with a car park, on the other side of the main street.
    To beautify this area, the corrugated iron fence had a mural painted of Australian Animals and Birds. In the wide median strip, was a new shed with the history of the town, and a map showing locations of interest. There was a nice garden where some ladies were busily trimming and weeding, volunteer's they told me, and that they had won the Community open garden scheme once. Altogether, it looked like Farrell Flat was making a community effort to make the town more attractive and welcoming to visitors.

    Don't ask me about the bicycles in the garden, I have no idea why they are there!

    Farrell Flat Mural @ Farrell Flat Farrell Flat Town History New toilets Farrell Flat community garden
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FARRELL FLAT

    by balhannah Written Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Farrell Flat, a small town, very quiet these days as the main road now bypasses the town.

    We saw two people and that was all......Where was everybody?

    Well, one Car was parked infront of the Pub!

    Homes were old, Shops were old, the Railway station was a "has been," although it did look like by the number of railway tracks here, that once it may have been a very busy station. The Grain Silo's still would be used, so one of the Train tracks would still be in use.

    Some of the old shops had been made into B&B's, I guess a good idea, as from here, it is only 20kms to Clare. Country people are extremely friendly too, so I am sure you would be made very welcome.

    Towns like this I find quite interesting, as in these places, it is a chance to see "the real old Australia!"

    Old Truck @ Farrell Flat Main street of Farrell Flat Main street of Farrell Flat Farrell Flat Hotel Farrell Flat Railway station
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    WATERVALE

    by balhannah Updated Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Watervale is a pretty town surrounded by vineyards that you will pass through if heading to Clare from Adelaide.

    The town was settled in 1840, and it was during this time that the Old Stanley Grammar School, the Uniting Church and the Methodist Church were built. They are all on the National Trust Heritage list now.

    Other sights were the Watervale Hotel, built in a prominent position in the centre of town. Nearby was a Heritage cottage, then I saw the old Hall was for sale, [they make a good home]
    Of course, in an old village, you may find old plants that you don't see much of now. I did, a Pomegranate Tree, laden with fruit.
    Nearby, is Annie's Lane Winery, located in the heritage listed Quelltaler Estate, dating back to 1863. There are picnic grounds, wines and foods.
    Each year, there is a "Day on the Green" concert at Annie's Lane.

    Watervale is 15kms from Clare, situated on the main north road.

    Watervale Hotel Pomegranate Tree National Trust Cottage Old Church
    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    PADNAINDI RESERVE

    by balhannah Written Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Padnaindi Reserve also has some nice mosaic panels which were made and designed by the Blyth Primary School children. These are of flora and fauna found in the area, and are very well done.
    The tiling of these mosaics took one day to complete, being done by volunteer's, aged from 7 - 70 years old.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    JOHN HORROCK'S COTTAGE

    by balhannah Written Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    JOHN HORROCKS.....Who was he?

    John Horrocks was a pioneer and explorer and was the first white man to take up land in this area near Clare.

    This Cottage was built by John Horrocks shortly after his arrival in South Australia in 1839. It's believed the Cottage was built for his sick brother Eustace, who accompanied him on the journey and needed decent accommodation.
    He built the Cottage on some land, and named the area/town "Penwortham,"after his home in Lancashire, England.

    John Horrocks died in 1846. Afterwards, the Cottage became the second official Post Office for Penwortham, with postal duties being carried out in the Main room of the Cottage. In 1863, a back room was built onto the cottage, and also a stone building to the south of the cottage became a butchers shop.
    In 1889-90, the shingle roof was covered with corrugated iron and in 1946, the hand-hewn wooden floors in the two front rooms were concreted. At the same time the whitewashed Hessian ceilings were replaced, and in 1960, the large fireplace was altered to try and stop the chimney smoking.

    The Cottage is now on the State Heritage list.

    OPEN...The 1st Sunday of the Month between 2pm-4pm or by appointment.

    LOCATION...Main North Road, Penwortham

    John Horrock's Cottage
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    PIKES WINES

    by balhannah Written Jul 4, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located across the road from the Polish Hill River church, was Pikes Winery.
    We had come here as we know some of the family.
    ‘Pikes Wines’ was established in 1984 at ‘Polish Hill River Estate." They produce a good choice of premium table wines, and recently have re-introduced Pikes Beer, which my family tells me is a good Beer.
    We have bought this Pilsener Beer in Queensland, so it must be available Australia wide. A limited release Stout is also available from Pikes Cellar Door Sales or on line.
    The Winery buildings are made out of stone, and they are set amongst beautiful gardens.

    Located on Polish Hill River Road, clare

    Pikes entrance Pikes Winery
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Wine Tasting
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    POLISH HILL RIVER & MUSEUM

    by balhannah Written Jul 3, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Polish Hill River is a small locality located 13kms from Clare. The Hill River was discovered by William Hill in 1838, and named after him by Edward John Eyre in 1839.

    The first pastoralist came here in 1844 and established Hill River Station in 1844.
    In the 1850's, Irish Catholic migrants arrived, all came from Glendalough, Wicklow. The first white child born at Hill River was in 1853.

    Later settlers arrived from Poland between the mid 1850's into the 1860s, hence, this is how the name originated.

    If you are interested in the Polish history of the area, the Polish River Church Museum has been established by the Polish Community. It is located in the church of St. Stanislaus Kostka, built in 1871.
    It was the first Polish Church in Australia and its parish priest Fr. Leon Rogalski S.J. was Australia’s first Polish Priest.

    In 1950 St. Stanislaus Kostka’s church was deconsecrated. Luckily, in 1971, restoration was begun by the Polish Community, and in 1980, was placed on the State Heritage list.

    In the museum are exhibits and documents relating to the three waves of Polish Settlement in South Australia, about polish settlers in the 19th century, Post WWII migration, solidarity migration in the 1980's.

    OPEN.........1st Sunday of the month from 11 - 4pm
    ENTRY........DONATION

    150 Years of Polish Settlement in S.A. Booklets and other souvenirs are available for purchase at the museum.

    Contact details:
    Irena: 08 83361601
    Krystyna: 08 83363646
    enquiries@phrcm.org.au

    The Museum can be opened for you, just ring one of the numbers and they will arrange it.
    cost in 2012, was $30 to cover fuel costs.

    13Kms from Clare

    Polish Hill River Church
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ONCE THE WHITE HUT CHAPEL

    by balhannah Written Jul 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with many Churches in Australia, when they are no longer needed they are sold to the public.
    The White Hut Chapel, built in 1860 and now restored, is one of these.
    It now belongs to Clare Valley Cabins, and you can rent it out, or one of the other Cabins.
    It's fully self -contained accommodation, with a King Size bed with luxury linen, reverse cycle airconditioning, heated bathroom and towel rail, Lounge, dining room, flat screen TV, DVD, CD, Kitchen with full facilities (stove, microwave, refrigerator), Washing machine, iron, ironing board, and Family size Webber BBQ.
    I loved the outdoor chess set, that would be fun!
    It is situated in a quiet area, yet only 4kms from Clare

    Chapel Chess Set White Hut Chapel
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    CEMETERIES & CHURCHES

    by balhannah Written Jul 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we drove around the backroads of Clare, we came across a few, small historic Cemeteries.

    One we came across, was the White Hut cemetery and Church. This dates back to 1860, when Thomas Pascoe transferred 1 acre of his land to Trustees of the Wesleyan Church for a Chapel and cemetery. The chapel was built in that year but burials seem to have commenced in 1868.
    The cemetery still looks to be used, but the Church is no longer.

    Located on Hubbe Road about 4 kms north of Clare.

    White Hut Cemetery Once, White Hut Church
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    BACKROADS AROUND ARMAGH

    by balhannah Updated Jul 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We came to Armagh along the main road, but didn't want to return this way, as we knew the Valley of Armagh Olive Estate and Glendalough Wines were on another road that would take us to where we were going. The cellar door is open 7days a week.

    The road was dirt and in good condition. On our journey, we drove through a beautiful stand of Gum Trees. Views, and like many in this district, were great! We saw acres and acres of vineyards, Olive trees, Sheep grazing in the paddocks, and old abandoned homes.
    Nobody seems to want the first settlers home, built strongly out of the local stone, some just need inside attention to make them liveable again.
    I read the Armagh Valley is similar to valleys in the Tuscany and Umbria regions of Italy.

    This road brought us out by the Clare Racecourse.

    Armagh valley view Armagh valley view On the road First Settlers cottage
    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    HISTORIC ARMARGH

    by balhannah Written Jul 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The village of Armagh was settled by Irish immigrants and named after their town and county of Armagh in Ireland.

    First settled in 1850, there is very little left of Armagh now. A nearby copper mine had been built at Emu Flat and this is why Armagh was established. The mine was never a success, closing down in 1910.
    Armagh area is now known for producing wine and olive oil.

    Most of the orignal old town has vanished leaving only a brick kiln, claypit, a few houses and the Miner’s Home Hotel, now a private museum. The old Church was now privately owned, and didn't look the safest with the many large cracks through-out the building.
    One little Cottage, known as St. Georges Cottage [1899] was painted and cared for. I was happy to see this, as what a shame if all evidence of our 1st pioneer's houses disappeared, no longer available for future generations to see!

    Armagh is a short drive on the main road to Blyth.

    Armagh Armagh Armagh Church
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tigerjapan's Profile Photo

    Riesling Trail

    by tigerjapan Written Jan 31, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Traversing the picturesque Clare Valley wine region, the Riesling Trail is one of the first rail-trails to be developed in South Australia. Developed by the Office for Recreation and Sport and the Clare Valley community, the trail runs for 27-kilometres along the old Riverton to Spalding railway line.

    The trail runs between the towns of Clare and Auburn - approximately two hours drive north of Adelaide. It's suitable for recreational walkers and is sealed and suitable for road bikes, as well as wheelchairs and pushers. Named after the grape and wine variety that the region is famous for, the Riesling Trail travels past many cellar doors and other visitor attractions, making it ideal for those wanting a leisurely walk with a distraction or two!

    There are numerous loop trails which allow users to return to their starting point without traveling over old ground. Car parking is available in Clare, Sevenhill, Watervale and Auburn.

    Along The Riesling Trail
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Wine Tasting
    • Cycling

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Clare

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

39 travelers online now

Comments

Clare Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Clare off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Clare sightseeing.

View all Clare hotels