Fun things to do in Kangaroo Island

  • Admirals Arch
    Admirals Arch
    by Longnosedbandicoot
  • The sea lion cub continues its search for its mum
    The sea lion cub continues its search...
    by Longnosedbandicoot
  • Cape du Couedic Lighthouse
    Cape du Couedic Lighthouse
    by kelyeah

Most Viewed Things to Do in Kangaroo Island

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    Eucalyptus Oil Distillery

    by kyoub Written Feb 8, 2005

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    Emu Ridge Is the only commercial Eucalyptus Oil Distillery left in South Australia and are totally self sufficient. generating their power by steam.
    Native farming is far better for our environment, no sprays and chemicals, a great renewable resource and a natural product.
    We took a tour of the distillery. Stopped in the gift shop to buy some oil take home with us.
    We also saw an orphaned baby kangaroo. in the gift shop.
    They try to rehab orphans here in this area and they have a special place where they are kept.

    Distillery sign
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Platypus Waterholes nature trail

    by Quero Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The main attraction of the area of Flinder's Chase nearest the Visitor's Center is the Platypus Waterholes nature trail. Platypus are endangered, and in an effort to increase population size, a number were relocated here from the mainland. The trail winds through the freshwater bog/creek area where the platypus have been introduced. There are wooden viewing platforms positioned at the edge of the creek and over the water at intervals along the trail.

    These are very shy creatures. Although I *thought* I *might* have seen the tell-tale bubble-and-ring disturbance on the surface of a pond a time or two, I have to admit that the only platypus I actually saw was this bronze one at the trail head.

    Walking along the nature trail, you also get a nice feel for the flora of Kangaroo Island. There are spiky, waxy flowers of several varieties, spiky-leafed trees and bushes, trees in bloom (I was there in December--summertime), and so on.

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    Learn a little lizard dance

    by Quero Updated Nov 26, 2004

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    The lizard in the photo is called a "goanna," and it, like the koala and the wallaby, was introduced into Kangaroo Island in an effort to protect it from extinction. You can see goannas sunning on walkways and pavements or scuttling into the underbrush when feeling threatened.

    You wouldn't imagine a lizard to be a very intelligent creature, but here's a fact that may demonstrate that they are: Kangaroo Island gets cold, and as these are cold-blooded creatures, they have learned to place their egg nests in the mounds of termites in order to incubate.

    I saw this one at Seal Bay Conservation Park. I like the shot because in it you can see that the lizard's right front and back feet are both off the ground and casting shadows as he runs.

    Lizard dance step: right front up, left back up...

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    Flinder's Chase National Park Visitor Center

    by Quero Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Flinder's Chase Visitor Center is a good place to begin a tour of Kangaroo Island since it is housed in a large new building with excellent interpretive displays of the island's geology and wildlife. There are even touch-and-feel exhibits for childeren to explore. The visitor's center also has nice bathrooms (in case you're camping in the bush and would like a flush toilet and running water to freshen up).

    In the parking area you will find lots and lots of kangaroos relaxing and posing with visitors. They may be hoping for handouts, but there is a sign asking people not to feed the wildlife: "Keep the wildlife wild."

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    WEIRS COVE

    by balhannah Written Dec 11, 2012

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    After seeing Remarkable Rocks, we headed by car back along Boxer drive, turning left in Cape Du Couedic road, and then a little later turning left again into Weirs Cove Road.

    This area was notorious for Shipwrecks. After three major ones, it was decided to build a Lighthouse. The problem was, how to bring the building materials here as there were no roads.
    It was decided all building materials were required to be brought by sea, being landed at Weir's Cove Jetty, then brought to the top of the 150 foot cliff via a flying fox. It was amazing seeing the cutting which was all hand made, what a lot of hard work was done to make this possible. All on-going supplies of food, clothing etc. arrived at 3-monthly intervals for lightkeepers and their families. The winch raising the supplies was driven by a stationary engine, not only supplies were winched to the top, but also people!
    I went for a wander around the ruins of the storeroom that was used to house the supplies for the lighthouse staff in the years 1907 to 1936. Only a few walls standing, and close to the house, the remains of a water well.

    Weirs Cove Weirs Cove Storehouse Weirs Cove Weirs Cove Water Well History of Weirs cove
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    Fur seals at Admiral's Arch

    by Quero Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The New Zealand fur seals found here are not true seals but rather a type of sea lion. The information posters at the entrance to the Admiral's Arch area of the park give this and other bits of information about these animals.

    Why does it matter? Because sea lions can actually use their back and front flippers to "walk" (sort of like inch-worms), which allows them to climb up on rocks along shorelines of the sort found at Admiral's Arch.

    You can't really get very close to these sea lions to take great portraits, but click on the image to see it a bit bigger and you might be able to tell which spots are the sea lions which spots are the rocks they are resting on.

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    Walk on seal beach

    by kyoub Written Feb 8, 2005

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    A highlight of any day is a visit to Seal Bay where your guide will walk you through a wild colony of Australian Sea lions as they relax in their natural habitat.
    You can walk the boardwalk afterwards and get some good views of the ocean and beach.
    There is a gift shop by the parking lot that has some good books on birding.

    Sea lions
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Hanson Bay koala sanctuary

    by Quero Updated Nov 26, 2004

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    Besides kangaroos, what other animal comes to mind when you think about Australia? Koalas, of course.

    Koalas were introduced to Kangaroo Island when the loss of their habitat on the mainland threatened their numbers. And they are still a threatened species... except on Kangaroo Island. The population of koalas on K.I. has increased so dramatically that they are considered pests by local residents--an example of the rule of unintended consequences, it seems. Efforts to cull the koalas to a manageable level have not got very far because of the fear of a tourist backlash.

    Of *course* people all over the world would think the authorities coldhearted if they were to allow culling, because koalas are so very adorable. Cuddly looking with round eyes below tufted, furry ears, and button-like black noses; babies clinging to their mothers tummies or backs; sitting placidly in gum trees munching on leaves... what could possibly be offensive about an animal that looks like a nursery toy?

    See them for yourself at the Hanson Bay koala sanctuary. From a small parking area, walk along a short wide pathway lined with gum trees. Look up into the branches to spot the koalas. The best time to go is late afternoon as koalas are nocturnal and will begin to rouse in the early evening.

    A juvenile 'tree-hugger'

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    Fairie penguin observation

    by Quero Updated Nov 26, 2004

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    If you are in the vicinity of Penneshaw at dusk, hurry on over to the area near the pier to spot the fairie (variously called little or blue or even fairy) penguins come ashore after a day of feeding in the ocean.

    They are light-sensitive, so you will need to take a flashlight with a red filter covering the lense so as not to blind them. (That's why I made this picture a black-and-white shot.)

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    Eye an echidna....(poke, poke)

    by Quero Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Among the shyest of Kangaroo Island animals is the native short-beaked echidna. I was very lucky to see this one, which was simply digging around at the side of the road.

    Echidnas are sometimes known as "spiny anteaters" because, in fact, they do eat ants, or rather termites. They first root around in the ground with their long, stick-like snouts to disturb the insects' nests. Then when the panicked little bugs come pouring out, the echidna is ready with a ribbon of flypaper disguised as a tongue, ready to lap them up.

    It is actually possible to volunteer for a weekend helping research scientists learn more about echidna behavior. If you are planning a trip to K.I. consider tacking on a weekend as a volunteer. Follow the link below for more information.

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    Sandboarding at Little Sahara

    by Quero Updated Nov 26, 2004

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    Little Sahara is an area of high sand dunes, which is common enough near oceans, but what is amazing is that these dunes are located a full 5 kilometers from shore!

    So, rent a sandboard and find your way inland to the most improbable desert you can imagine. We rented our boards at a small grocery along the way, the Kiawarra Food Barn.

    Sandboarding is actually harder than it looks. You'll laugh at your clumsiness and curse getting sand in your scalp and up your shorts. I still laugh every time I remember my own hours of digging sand out of seemingly every crevice....

    LOL

    Don't fall! You'll get sand all up your.....

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    HOPE COTTAGE MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Dec 13, 2012

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    Hope Cottage Folk Museum is right in the town of Kingscote. As this was the case, we went for a look.
    Part of the Museum is located in the historic Cottage itself. The Cottage belongs to the National trust now, and is one of the Island's most historic homes. The pioneering Calnan brothers built it in the 1850s with the proceeds from a gold-mining expedition to Victoria. Inside, it is fitted out with furnishings of the era and many old photos of the families.
    Other buildings in the Museum are a 50's style garage and office, complete with old cars and motorbikes. Farming implements, old boats, washing machines, clothing, and much more were on display. There was even a photo of the Karatta, the old Ship which used to be the only way to reach Kangaroo Island.
    I thought it was quite good. It was very cheap.

    ADMISSION IN 2012......$5 Adults
    OPEN......
    1pm-4pm daily September-July (extended in January 10am-4pm)

    Hope Cottage Museum Hope Cottage Museum Hope Cottage Museum Hope Cottage Museum Hope Cottage Museum
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE EXPLORERS - 3

    by balhannah Written Dec 13, 2012

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    Our third stop was at CONTEMPLATION SEAT.
    This seat was sculptured by a local artist, in memory of the Aboriginal people, mainly women who were brought here by the pre-colonial Sealers, Sailors and Outcasts. The women helped the early settlers with Wallaby trapping and the treatment of the skins. They also had knowledge of medicinal and food plants found on the Island.
    The names of these Aboriginal people are engraved on the steps leading to Contemplation Seat.

    Contemplation Seat
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    CAPE WILLOUGHBY

    by balhannah Written Dec 14, 2012

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    Still travelling on the dirt road to Cape Willoughby, we come over a rise on the road, and there before us was the Lighthouse and cottages!
    Cape Willoughby was the first lighthouse to be erected in South Australia, and lights the Backstairs Passage between Kangaroo Island and the mainland. Although the lighthouse was meant to prevent Shipwrecks, still a number of ships sank off the coastline, the remnants of which can still be found in the area. I saw a notice that this area is part of the Kangaroo Island Shipwreck trail.

    I didn't do a guided tour of the Lightstation, but you can and find out more about the early role of coastal shipping, colonial trading and passenger transport. The tour takes you to the top of the Lighthouse where in season, Whales can be seen.
    Cape Willoughby park visitor centre has a museum with a collection of old photo's, as well as equipment that was once used at the site
    The heritage-listed lightkeepers' cottages are available to rent.

    I don't know if I had seen too much good scenery before coming here or what, but I was a little disappointed.

    Cape Willoughby Conservation Park Visitor Centre is open 9am-3.30pm daily (except Christmas Day). 7days a week
    Fees apply for the park.

    Cape Willoughby First sight of Cape Willoughby Cape Willoughby Cape Willoughby
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    STOKES BAY BEACH

    by balhannah Written Dec 13, 2012

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    The other big surprise at Stokes Bay, was when I emerged from the rock tunnel to find a beautiful, pristine sandy Beach.
    It was wow! So different to the other side which was full of rocks and seaweed. The Beach was so clean, and there was only one couple walking along the Beach, hows that!
    A rock pool was in this area making it very safe for the children to have fun in the water. Even the cliffs were interesting. Most were honeycombed and there were caves I went into for a look. What a very nice area, one that I could have easily missed.

    Stokes Bay beach area See the entrance... Stokes Bay beach area Stokes Bay Cave Cliffs at Stokes Bay
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • School Holidays
    • Family Travel

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