Port Adelaide Travel Guide

  • Restaurants
    by wabat
  • Restaurants
    by wabat
  • Restaurants
    by wabat

Port Adelaide Things to Do

  • Walk the Port

    In addition to being the best way to get around “Walk the Port” is the title of an excellent walking guide for the historic area of Port Adelaide. The guide can be picked up at the tourist office/ visitors centre on the intersection of Commercial Road and St Vincent’s Street (from which the walk starts).The guide highlights 38 points of interest...

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  • South Australian Maritime Museum

    While physically not a large museum, the collection is contained on three small floors, there is quite a bit of content to cover. Overall it is informative and worth an hour or two depending on your level of interest in things nautical. Your ticket allows multiple visits on the same day should you really get into it and wish to go out for a break...

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  • The Churches but no entry!

    When I visit somewhere I like to drop into the local churches, synagogues, temples, cemeteries and such like. I do this not because I am terribly religious but rather because I find such sojourns peaceful and such places tend to hold a wealth of historical information and give you an insight into an area that you might not otherwise get.In Port...

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  • Port Admiral Hotel and Coach House

    The hotels and drinking establishments covered in my heritage pub trail (crawl) tip all have one thing in common. They are in operation and await your business.Alas, the subject of this tip, the Port Admiral Hotel, closed in 2006 and was still boarded up on my most recent trip in December 2013. Should any of my readers wish to acquire this...

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  • Heritage Pub Trail (Crawl)

    If all your wandering around Port Adelaide leaves you feeling a little dehydrated, fear not there are ample establishments which can come to the rescue and you won’t have far to walk. Being a port town and having catered for the needs of seafarers for 150 years plus there is almost literally a pub on every corner (and in fact there used to be!)....

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  • Professional Fishermen’s Memorial

    In addition to being a commercial port for the import and export of goods and indeed people, Port Adelaide has had a long history in commercial fishing – an oft dangerous activity for the unprepared in dangerous seas. If you saw my Seafarer’s Memorials review you will be aware that more than 340 ships were wrecked along South Australia's coast with...

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  • Poverty Corner

    Come back with me 100 years, if you will.As you may have picked up from my other tips, Port Adelaide was, by the end of the 19 century and into the 20th century a thriving Port and many people were making lots of money – but not everyone.Work at sea and within the port was hard, the hours were long, working conditions were seldom good and the pay...

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  • Not really a Boer War Memorial

    While classified as a Boer War Memorial by the tourist authorities this is not actually a memorial. It is, in fact, a plaque on the wharf adjacent to the Port Adelaide Lighthouse, donating the point from which the first contingent of South Australian Infantry boarded the PS Yatala for transfer to, and embarkation on, the troopship Medic as they set...

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  • Have the buildings really sunk?

    As you wander around Port Adelaide and in particular the area around the National Maritime Museum you could be forgiven for asking yourself if the buildings have at some stage sunk into the ground as you see tops of windows jutting out just above the current street level.In fact the buildings (the Port's oldest) have not sunk but rather the street...

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  • Seafarers’ Memorials

    Located on Timpson Street just in from the Port River are two memorials to seafarers which were formerly located elsewhere in Port Adelaide – the older Merchant Navy Memorial and the more recent SS Admella Memorial – The Navigator.Ships made a vital contribution to the development of South Australia as an early colony through the shipment of both...

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  • Workers Memorial

    Port Adelaide has, since the 1830s when Colonel William Light, the first Surveyor-General of the Colony of South Australia and designer of Adelaide, decided that it and Adelaide should be distinct separate entities, always been a blue collar or working class area. The gentry resided in Adelaide. This division, by and large, remains to this...

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  • Does anyone know Mildred?

    I really hate it when I come across something of interest and am unable to find out any information about it. The picture and proclamation attached is affixed to the front of now vacant shop in the Bower Buildings, 150-166 St. Vincent Street, a couple of hundred metres from the visitors information centre. Try as I might, I have been unable to find...

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  • A grand entrance for a car park

    Now the rather grand entrance arch for a municipal car park, this majestic structure was formally the bridge-keeper's gantry on the 1875-1966 version of the Jevois Bridge, a bridge which bridged the swampy estuary between Port Adelaide and Semaphore on the Lefevre Peninsula - the point where overseas mail was by then being discharged. The Jervois...

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  • The Port’s Silent Cop

    When I came across the attached object its general shape and demeanour - an oversized traffic cone in the local football team’s (the Port Adelaide Magpies) colours of black and white - lead me to suspect that it was some form of traffic control device.As Port Adelaide developed so too did traffic congestion. This was particularly so between and...

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  • Port Adelaide Lighthouse

    Standing prominently at the end of Commercial Road by the Port River, and visible for quite some distance if you enter the Port via this road, is the Port Adelaide lighthouse which has now become an icon for the Port Area.The Port Adelaide lighthouse, prefabricated in England and shipped to Australia in pieces, was first lit on January 1st 1869...

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  • Water for the Port – Formby Memorial...

    One for lovers of Victoriana.Drinking water has been a problem in Port Adelaide since the port’s founding in the 1830s. Some would say it remains a problem for Adelaide even today with its very hard water – though it tastes fine to me.The port's land was originally just higher than the surrounding tidal flats such that at high tide the port could...

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  • National Railway Museum - Train...

    If you have even a passing interest trains this is a must visit place. If you love trains well … what can I say … you’ll be in heaven.Unlike a lot of “train museums” I have been to, this one is all about the trains - real trains. Railway memorabilia such as crockery, menu’s, station machines are all there but they very much take second place to the...

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  • GRANGE

    Grange is a sea-side suburb located approx 8kms from Port Adelaide. After leaving Port Adelaide, we headed to the beachside suburb of Grange where the Grange Hotel is located by the beach and the Grange Jetty. If you want to see a beautiful, historic building, take a walk along the Esplanade towards West Lakes, and you will see the lovely building...

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  • ST. VINCENT CHAMBERS

    St. Vincent Chambers [1883] is located in a row of shops. I thought it interesting that the original plans have survived up till today!Evidently, the "Chambers" are a rare example of a two-storey terrace of shops and residences largely in original condition. The verandah was not part of the original design, but was added at an unknown date prior to...

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  • JAMES BROTHERS STORE

    Who were James Brothers of Port Adelaide? I haven't been able to find out!All I know is the heritage building had this full size poster stating..."James Brothers Store supplied Mildred with 608lbs of humbugs between 1898 and 1918"I loved it, and just had to take a photo!

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  • PORT HERITAGE PUB TRAIL!

    I have never heard of one of these before, but here at Port Adelaide, you can pick up a brochure that will show you the way on the "Pub Trail."Port Adelaide is well known for having a lot of Hotels, and on this walk, you will visit ten.All are "Heritage Pubs," steeped in history, so there is a good chance of hearing a tale or too!There even is a...

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  • JOHN FORMBY MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN

    I came across this beautiful old fountain as I walked along St. Vincent street. It was very ornate, something like I have seen in Europe.This drinking fountain was built with money from public subscription, as a memorial in memory of John Formby, Mayor of Port Adelaide 1869-1873.A committee decided a drinking fountain would be a suitable mark of...

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  • WORKER'S MEMORIAL

    When I first saw this memorial, I thought it was a War Memorial, to my surprise it wasn't.This white marble statue of "Justice," was erected at the corner of Commercial road and St.Vincent Street, Port Adelaide, in 1921.This memorial is unique, as it honours the men who had worked unceasingly everyday, sacrificing much so that their fellows might...

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  • PORT ADELAIDE DOLPHIN TRAIL

    The Port Adelaide Dolphin's are so well known, they have made a brochure which includes a trail map of where you most possibly will find them. You do need a car to follow the Bottlenose Dolphin trail. The idea is to go to the spots on the trail, which are where the Dolphins are most frequently seen. Interpretive signs are at these locations giving...

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Port Adelaide Restaurants

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    Cafe Foreyou 3 more images

    by wabat Written Jan 2, 2014

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This café is very conveniently located across the road (Lipson Street) from the entrance to the South Australian Maritime Museum and as such has become the de facto café for the museum. On my museum tip I indicated that your ticket is valid for re-entry on the same day thus making slipping out for a coffee or more very feasible as the museum does not have its own café.

    The café has a great feel about it with a pleasant cosy ambiance with indoor and out-door seating both available.

    The menu is reasonably extensive with sandwiches, wraps, rolls and snacks all available together with bistro type meals. All the drink options you might expect in a good café are available (including alcoholic beverages).

    Ice cream and a good selection of cakes and other sweet things are available.

    For lunch we chose a fisherman’s basket (presented in paper cones – see picture) and salt and pepper squid together with soft drinks. Quality-wise the meals could be equated with reasonable quality Aussie pub food. To be honest I had expected better. My major disappointment was that the seafood was all frozen and the squid a bit undercooked and soggy.

    Given that this is a port I certainly expected fresh seafood on the menu.

    That said, the meal was ok, prices reasonable and service fine. Unless you want pub food from any one of the multitude of pubs in the area or fast food (a bit of a walk required) there are not many other options in the area.

    Reading reviews for the café on Trip Advisor I noted that there was a change in ownership of the café mid 2013. Reviews prior to the change-over are much better than more current ones. I trust the new management will take note.

    A small amount of artwork (for sale) adorns the walls.

    The café is open for breakfast and lunch 9am – 4pm, 7 days per week.

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Port Adelaide Transportation

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    by wabat Written Dec 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Getting to Port Adelaide

    Port Adelaide is approximately 15kms from Adelaide city centre.

    Unless you are driving yourself – bus or train services are convenient and recommended. Bus and train services are run by Adelaide Metro. For fares etc please refer to my Bus, Tram, Train - Tickets and Routes. For maps and timetables http://www.adelaidemetro.com.au/Timetables-Maps

    Bus – Route number 150 is best from North Terrace via Port Road. There is a stop adjacent to the tourist office in Port Adelaide – alight here. The trip takes around 30 minutes and services are around every 15 minutes during the day (less later in the evening).

    Train – From Adelaide Railway Station on North Terrace – Out Harbour Line alight at Port Adelaide Station. Train trip around 20 minutes (runs every 30 minutes – less in later evening) but note that from the train station to the tourist office is a further 10 minutes walk. Trains are exactly in the attached picture – small two carriage sets.

    Taxi(one way) from Adelaide – North Terrace - $A30 - Peak Rates Mon – Friday (06:00 - 18:59) or $A35 Off Peak Rates (19:00 - 05:59 + Saturday & Sunday). Approximately 20 minutes. Even with 4-5 people train or bus will be cheaper if perhaps less convenient.

    By Car – from Adelaide City – Take Port Road and follow signs for Port Adelaide. Parking in Port Adelaide is relatively easy and free though time limited in some areas. Sunday can be difficult around the market/wharf area.

    Getting Around Port Adelaide – by foot, its small.

    Related to:
    • Trains

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Port Adelaide Shopping

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    Fisherman's Wharf Market

    by wabat Written Dec 31, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This large building, Fisherman’s Wharf Market, next to the red lighthouse is only used once a week when it opens as a market.

    It is quite a large market sprawling over two levels (lift and escalator available) with the usual array of stalls and food outlets - around 120 stalls. Do have a good fossick around as there are lots of interesting things (amongst the general rubbish) to be found here if you take your time.

    I have been coming here once a year, around Christmas, for years now (I didn't actually go in 2013 but my Adelaide friends tell me its exactly as it was in 2012) and I must say it is getting a bit tired and seems to change little from year to year – It needs a bit of a shake-up. Granted, this lack of variety/change is not a problem if you are visiting once only and you should indeed visit it - Easy to pass a couple of hours here.

    Here you will find:
    •“Antiques” and a wide variety of collectables
    •New, vintage and indeed bridal clothing
    •fashion accessories for women and men
    •toys including specialty toys such as tin toys and ‘putt putt boats’
    •Furniture and home accessories
    •books, records and sheet music
    •Garden ornaments and
    •Lots more – something for everyone

    Note that if you do choose to drive, parking is very tight around the market area and you would be advised to park a little further away and walk in.

    While I have written this tip in Jan 2014 the last time I visited the market was Dec 2012. When I locate some decent photos I will add them! Until then, don't be put off by the photo I just happened to take from the car-park.

    Opening hours

    Sundays and on Public Holidays (Mondays only) from 9am to 5pm

    Entry Free

    Free

    What to buy: Lots of things here !

    What to pay: Prices here are reasonable.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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Port Adelaide Warnings and Dangers

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    Tom Derrick Opening Bridge

    by balhannah Written Jul 31, 2012

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    A few of the Bridge's in the Port Adelaide area, are opening Bridges. The Tom 'Diver' Derrick Bridge, [photo] is an opening single-leaf bascule bridge over the Port River, Port Adelaide. It was built at the same time as the Mary MacKillop Bridge railway Bridge.

    Opening Bridges are needed to maintain the inner harbour as an active waterway. The opening times balances the needs of the public, freight, industry and mariners.

    Opening times will generally not exceed 15 minutes and will depend on the number of vessels (marine traffic) passing under the bridges. If all marine traffic cannot pass through during the allocated 15 minutes, the bridges will close to allow road traffic to clear and then re-open for a further ten minutes.

    Road signs are located on the approaches to the expressway, informing motorists if the Bridge is open or closed. If the road bridge is opening, barriers and flashing warning lights will warn and halt motorists.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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