Port Lincoln Favorites

  • Soon we'll be out there
    Soon we'll be out there
    by iandsmith
  • Looking back to the fog
    Looking back to the fog
    by iandsmith
  • So can Bob
    So can Bob
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Favorites in Port Lincoln

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Living the dream

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 13, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soon we'll be out there
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: These are my pages about Coffin Bay which sits on the other side of the peninsula about 50 kilometres away but unfortunately isn't listed on VT.
    The reason I wanted to go to Eyre was to go fishing out of Coffin Bay and bag a couple of big snapper.
    That's then how I came to be at this foreshore on a day in May 2006. If I'd ordered weather this would have been it.;
    I will quote from here on in from a story I wrote:

    Fondest memory: Coffin Bay's caravan park is ideally situated but, then again, so is about every building here as the water is rarely more than two blocks away. Since we had pre-booked a fishing charter here, at last we would see the inside of a boat. The next day was eagerly awaited and Glenn Boucher advised us to be at the boat launching ramp at 8.30a.m.
    We walked up and were early. Glenn turned up and said we would be delayed for a little while. Just enough time for me to walk back to the shop and grab a couple of pies. Well, I was hungry wasn't I?
    When I returned the enshrouding fog had lifted just enough to prompt Glenn to put the craft in the water. Ghostly images were in abundance at the end of the visible range. The limpid waters were as glass on the surface. Had we ordered weather this is what we would have wanted. While Bob and I pigged out on pastry Glenn gunned the boat out through the port and then the bay. It's a long way and you can count on the best part of an hour before you reach open waters.

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Seniors
    • Fishing

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    A vast arena

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006
    Looking north
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: For the western part of the National Park you need a four wheel drive. If you do, you'd want to allow some serious time to take the place in as it's about 40 kilometres to get to Point Sir Isaac. There are camping sites at six locations in total though only one is two wheel drive accessible

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Summing up

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006
    From the cliff
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    Favorite thing: Beyond the scenery there was fishing on Almonta Beach and the epic right hander off the east pillar of Golden Island that had been surfed by cray fishermen and a few others who had managed to get the 3 or so kilometres offshore to this remote location. I had surfed for many years but, not in my wildest dreams would I paddle out to a place like that. It was almost Everest like in its scope, but you don't get white pointers in Nepal.
    The waves below Point Avoid were truly radical, breaking in ways and artistic shapes I'd never before seen in my life. I watched, fascinated, as the minutes ticked by. Here was nature putting on a display for those who cared to see.

    Related to:
    • Surfing
    • Beaches
    • National/State Park

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    On Golden's ponds

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006
    Epic right hander off Golden Island
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: Just offshore was Golden Island, probably named when the sun was low on the horizon and the stone changed hue. The swell literally wrapped itself around either end before swinging around and meeting itself head on. It was unlike any place I'd ever seen on earth. There was unlimited movement everywhere as the tortured, boiling, rippling mass of salt water twisted and turned every which way, sometimes crashing into itself, other times smiting itself upon the coastline.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Surfing

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    The feeling of power

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006
    Bizarre and powerful
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    Favorite thing: While there I wrote the following - "The roar, as a bull exhaling, indicates a crack in the rocks where today salt laden air gushes skyward. Tomorrow it will widen and then the seemingly solid face will eventually be rent asunder, cleaved as with a sharp axe as the torrent of irresistable salt water gains a further few metres.
    To stand beside it all with a moderate sea running is to bring all senses to bear on the power that nature can deliver and the devastation such power can wreak."

    Fondest memory: Picture three gives you some idea of the force of erosion while 2 shows the results and 4 shows it about to happen

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Almost untouched beaches

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006
    Almonta - as far as the eye can see
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: It's the scale of the place that is impressive, as Bob kept remarking. You just can't grasp how much of it there is and, with the surf running at 2-4 metres, it transfixes your gaze. Somehow it's almost impossible to leave.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches
    • Fishing

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    COffin Bay National Park

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just before the entrance to the park
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: I'd seen a couple of photos on the net but they don't really prepare you for what's ahead at the National Park. The whole peninsula is basically a huge sand dune, mostly covered with scrub but, where the dunes were denuded of growth by the ocean, they formed a striking backdrop to the vast Almonta Beach which becomes Gunyah Beach further east.

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    • Beaches
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Not quite gormet

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bob heading for the oysters
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: The next day was Coffin Bay National Park.
    Just before we moved out we thought it was time to try the local delicacy - home grown oysters. We slipped in and grabbed a dozen fresh ones each. Ever inventive we put them on a sandwich each. Now, I don't know if you've ever tried that before, but the word bland sprang readily to mind. Not a good idea.

    Fondest memory: Pic one, where you buy them, pic two, where they come from

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel
    • Food and Dining

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    The return

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    How to feed a caravan park

    Fondest memory: Everyone should have at least one day like that in their lives.
    The funny part of the day came as Glenn had us ride in the boat on the back of the trailer to take us back to the caravan park. As we slowly trickled down the speed humps at the rear of the park people started appearing and following us down the road like pelicans awaiting their daily feed. We felt a bit like the Pope waving to the encircling crowd. I couldn't help but smile.
    Turns out a couple of them wanted to organize a charter while others were just curious. Thus it was that we fed half the park that night including one lady who I thought was going to prostrate herself in thanks for the nannygai that I gave here. It was our 15 minutes of fame.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The best of days

    by iandsmith Written Jun 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A real friendly giant
    3 more images

    Fondest memory: The sheer bliss of the return journey with patterned cirrus clouds reflected in the still waters as we churned a furrow through the benign surface was something I'll never forget. To make it even better we got to hand feed a wild giant petrel back at the wharf.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    On a clear day

    by iandsmith Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    5 metres deep and clear as crystal

    Favorite thing: Back in the bay we fished for whiting but only bagged a leatherjacket (never caught one of those before said Glenn) and a salmon. Not a whiting in sight and, believe me, we were fishing in 20 feet of water and the bottom was clearly visible. Only on the Great Barrier Reef had I seen water as clear.
    We pushed further back until we got to the oyster beds. Finally we spotted a school and dropped anchor......about four times in fact before Glenn got it right but, once set we got into them. It's amazing actually watching the fish come and take your bait, something I'd never experienced before and we certainly got our share of the famed King George Whiting.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    No parking zone

    by iandsmith Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A near disaster

    Favorite thing: The only down side was the two hook ups I had that I didn't retrieve. As with all "one that got away" stories, they were comfortably bigger than anything else we hooked. Glenn estimated one at over 15 kilos and, though I had it for 6-7 minutes, it spat the bait much to my despair and frustration. Still, a minor disappointment in an otherwise perfect day.
    Slowly working our way back to the entrance we passed a cray boat that had come aground on Point Sir Isaac, which just happen to be the first part of Mr. Coffin's name. According to Glenn the boat had not been in the hands of the regular skipper and his mate turned early and, fortunately for those on board, they rode a wave up onto the rock shelf where it still sits today.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Just another ***ty day in paradise

    by iandsmith Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I can do it
    2 more images

    Fondest memory: The balmy autumn weather; 20 degrees, barely a ripple on the ocean, fish coming over the side regularly. In your dreams maybe. For us it was reality. We continually remarked on how fortunate we were to be in this place on this day. Glenn said it was as good as it gets. We couldn't imagine how it would ever be better.
    The only down side was the two hook ups I had that I didn't retrieve. As with all "one that got away" stories, they were comfortably bigger than anything else we hooked. Glenn estimated one at over 15 kilos and, though I had it for 6-7 minutes, it spat the bait much to my despair and frustration. Still, a minor disappointment in an otherwise perfect day.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Fishing
    • Luxury Travel

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    My fishy, what big teeth you have

    by iandsmith Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mind your fingers

    Favorite thing: The bulk of our catch was made up of Nannygai (red snapper) though we ended up catching 9 species.
    For me the catch of the day was after we had lost 3 rigs to savage attacks. Bob then finally proceeded to latch on to our nemesis, a lively barracouta with fearsome teeth. When he finally got it on board it was despatched and used as bait. I couldn't resist taking a picture of its teeth. Awesome.

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Fishing
    • Road Trip

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Oceans away

    by iandsmith Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here, look, I can catch fish
    1 more image

    Fondest memory: We reached them and were still in fog as we swung on a port tack and left it behind as the blue sky flecked with cirrus clouds beckoned us onwards. It was weird. The fog still clung to the bay and its finger extended out a few kilometres. It ended up staying there for another two hours.
    Did we care. Not a whit. As we rode over the key spot known by Glenn we cast our lines out, ever hopeful.
    My first hook up was a snapper, fighting most of the way to the surface. It came in at three and half kilos. I was chuffed. As it turned out it was the biggest we were to catch for the day and one of only two snapper.

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Fishing

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