Streaky Bay Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Streaky Bay

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    CAPE BAUER LOOP - THE BLOW HOLES

    by balhannah Updated Jun 11, 2012

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    This was our next stop. Here are Whistling holes and Blow holes.
    The Whistling Rocks/Blowholes are on the clifftops of the northern section of Corvisart Bay. Wave action and the dissolution of coastal limestone has resulted in rounded shafts which funnel air under pressure from the crashing waves below. These features are dangerous, so be very careful.

    The whistling holes we could distinctly hear noise as the water came in, and the Blowholes weren't working, the sea wasn't rough enough, so there was only a very small spray coming through the hole.

    They are easy to reach from the Car-park. There is a boardwalk and viewing platforms with wheelchair access. 10mins is all it takes to walk to the viewing platforms.

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    CAPE BAUER COASTAL PLANTS

    by balhannah Written Jun 11, 2012

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    Cape Bauer
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    I had already taken photo's of plants growing inbetween rocks and in the sand, such a harsh area they were growning and they seemed to be growing well.
    At the Whistling Holes/Blow Holes, there was a notice board about the plant life. It had a photo of each plant and a description.

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    CAPE BAUER

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2012

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    Cape Bauer
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    As we continue along the dirt road, we are on the look out for the Brown tourist signs. We soon find one, and turn - off into a carpark.
    We have only travelled about 16 kms from Streaky Bay and were already at the Cape itself.
    Be ready to be amazed at the stunning high cliffs, the colour of the cliffs was outstanding, and the views of Olive Island and the Ocean.
    Cape Bauer is the northern headland which forms the boundary between the Chain of Bays to the south and Streaky Bay to the north. The rocky cliffs of the Cape Bauer area is a known breeding territory for Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagles, we saw quite a few of these.

    The best time for photos is at sunset, the cliffs have a lot of colour then.

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    CAPE BAUER DRIVE LOOP

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2012

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    Fishing Tractor
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    If you come to Streaky Bay, then you must stay and do some of the tourist drives.
    We did, and were amazed at the coastal scenery we saw on this part of the Great Australian Bight.

    To do the Cape Bauer loop, head out in your Car past the caravan park and turn left after Bayview Farm. The road was dirt, but in good condition.
    We didn't go far before we made our 1st stop, this was at a Boat ramp where the views were good of Streaky Bay.
    There were heaps of old Tractors with boat trailers attached. These are needed as the water is shallow, so to launch their boats, they have to go quite a way out to sea so the Boat can float off the trailer.

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    HISTORICAL WALK - 1

    by balhannah Updated Jun 10, 2012

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    Carol J
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    Lets go on the historical walk of Streaky Bay, just you and me!

    The walk is about 2.6km and I found it quite easy to do.

    Some buildings that are located along Alfred street were the Old Council Chambers, built in 1892. There is an information plaque on the building.

    Next I walked around the corner in Eyre Avenue, and here I found a boat on dry dock, she was named the "Carol J." The "Carol J' was a Sharking Boat, built in 1958, and storm wrecked in 1985.

    At the other end of Alfred Terrace, I came across a Memorial to Thomas Mudge, the 1st Policemen at Streaky Bay.

    A little further, was Beck's store, which is now a Restaurant with a lovely view.

    Lastly was the Powerhouse. This building opened in 1992 as a museum for restored engines, a lot of them are in working order.

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    TOWN HISTORICAL WALK - 3

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2012

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    House @ Streaky Bay
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    Located on the corner of Bay road and Alfred street, are three historic buildings located together.
    One is the Council chamber/Institute Hall, built in 1934, replacing an older hall from 1887.

    Time to walk along Bay road now. Located in the centre median strip is Nutys Monument, afraid I didn't take a photo of the plaque, so I don't know who this person was.
    Next to the monument was the Wishing Well, built for the 75th anniversary of the District Council.

    In the side streets were quite a variety of different styles of homes. By the style of home, you can tell how rich the original owner was of the home.

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    TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2012

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    Information Centre

    This is a must stop, if you want to go on a walk around the town. I picked up the Streaky Bay Historic Walk brochure. The distance is about 2.6kms, and in the brochure is a map with locations and information.
    The centre is full of brochures and helpful staff.

    The centre itself is a noted historic building, once the Masonic Temple in 1926. The walls are made of "Mount Gambier" stone, which of course came from the town of Mt. Gambier.

    OPEN....
    Monday to Friday 9.00 am - 12.30 pm, 1.30 pm - 5.00 pm
    The Visitor Information Centre provides a tourism touch screen if you are unable to visit during opening hours. The screen is located in the window on the left hand side of the entry door.

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    WALK.....'THE BAY"

    by balhannah Written Jun 10, 2012

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    Streaky Bay
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    Entering town, we headed towards the coast as this was where our Caravan Park was located.
    When I first saw the Bay, I immediately thought what a pretty location Streaky Bay was in.

    From the main part of the town, there is a beautiful view over the bay. If it is a calm day, and we didn't strike one, you will see the streaks in the water, hence the name "Streaky Bay"
    There is a pathway which follows the coastline all the way to the Caravan Park, about a 1.5 km walk, but a lovely one to do at any time of the day.
    Each day I saw something different, like the horse's in the sea having a splash around, another time some small boats heading out, and then the children having fun in the shallow water, men trying to find worms in the sand when the tide went out, and always lots of Pelicans!

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    The town itself

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 29, 2009

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    In the main street
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    Pieter Nuyts passed by on his 1627 voyage but it was really when Matthew Flinders was doing a thorough exploration of the area that the European influence began.
    Nuyts' visit to the area is marked by the Pieter Nuyts Monument in the median strip on Bay Road near the Community Hotel.
    Flinders named the bay because of the streaks he noticed in the water, probably only seaweed.
    The other great explorer, after whom the entire peninsula is named, was Edward John Eyre who passed through the area in 1839. His journey is recalled in Eyre's Water Hole which is located about 3 km out of Streaky Bay on the road to Port Kenny. A sign at the rather neat and modern water hole points out that 'At this spot, Baxter, after crossing the peninsula from Port Augusta waited in dire anxiety to rejoin his leader, Edward John Eyre, who had ridden from Mount Arden via Port Lincoln.'
    The area was slowly settled in the second half of the nineteenth century. Farmers came first, then the whalers and, the most successful industry, oyster farming, followed soon after.
    Originally called Flinders, the official name became the even older area tag of Streaky Bay. Today there are definite signs of growth with a new housing estate, lots of tourists (for a village this size) and small industries growing up as a result.
    The only eternal problem here is fresh water, or, more specifically, lack of same.

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    Westall Way camping

    by Diceman_ Updated May 4, 2007

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    Westall Way sunset
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    I tried to find the campsite mentioned at Nullarbor Net (http://www.nullarbornet.com.au/themes/westallWay.html) but only found dirt carparks. I didn't want to camp in a carpark so I drove down un-signposted dirt roads and found a good coastal spot before sundown. However the wind carried a fine white dust that got into everything, which detracted somewhat from the experience (especially as I had spent the previous night camping in red bulldust in the Gawler Ranges).

    Overall Westall Way is good for free or very cheap camping outside of Streaky Bay, but if it's windy it might be best to find more sheltered accommodation (unless you have a campervan or trailer).

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    Murphy's Haystacks

    by Diceman_ Updated Feb 28, 2007

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    A different perspective on Murphy's Haystacks
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    Reminiscent of nearby Mount Wudinna, and the Remarkable Rocks, Murphy's Haystacks are a group of scattered inselbergs on a hill in farming country 40km south-east of Streaky Bay.
    There are toilet facilities and sheltered picnic tables, but don't expect to unpack out of your boot as they are about 20m from the pedestrian-only entrance.
    The Haystacks are interesting but lack the impact of the Remarkable Rocks' coastal setting (and litter doesn't help). What I found just as interesting is the surrounding countryside, as the views are fairly uninterrupted. I was curious as to how similar the region was to my native Adelaide Hills (it is very similar).

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    Point Labatt Conservation Park

    by Diceman_ Updated Feb 28, 2007

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    Point Labatt seals
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    Point Labatt Conservation Park hosts the only mainland seal colony in Australia. The seals can be viewed from a platform on top of the cliff, about 50m above. Bring your binoculars or a camera with zoom lens for a close-up view. Given the Eyre Peninsula's reasonable tourist thoroughfare, you can probably get the lookout to yourself. As an added bonus the dirt road leading to the lookout affords great views of Baird Bay. Entry is free.

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    Cape Bauer and Whistling Rocks

    by Diceman_ Updated Feb 28, 2007

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    Cape Bauer panorama
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    Driving north-east out of streaky bay takes you to Cape Bauer and the whistling rocks. Unfortunately this drive looked more scenic on Google Earth than it did in real life.

    Cape Bauer is a good introduction to the west coast of the Eyre peninsula, as you get a glimpse of the erosive forces that have removed untold kilometres of land. Just down the road are the Whistling Rocks, another testament to the sea's power. I'm not sure if any water comes out of the geysers there. Occasionally there is a brief noise from the air rushing through them, I'm not sure if this was the "whistling" the feature takes its name from.

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    Up close and personal with a great white shark

    by Dxenion Written Sep 3, 2006
    Bigger than a small car!
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    This was an unexpected surprise. I went in to pay for fuel and the attendant asked me if I'd seen the shark yet. At first I had not idea what he was talking about until he directed me into their back room.

    There, hanging by almost invisible wire is a fibreglass cast of the largest great white pointer shark ever caught. I knew Streaky Bay and the surrounding area was renoun for the waters being full of white pointers but not even an internet search reeled in this info.

    I'm so glad I've never come across anything like this whilst out sea kayaking.

    For the record: It was 5 metres long and weighed 1526 kg - to put that in perspective - it weighed more than most small cars!

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    Clinging to life

    by iandsmith Written Jun 20, 2006

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    Colourful succulents
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    One thing that continually attracted us was the diversity of plant life in seemingly hostile regions, especially around the almost barren cliff tops. It once again highlighted the wonder of nature to fill up every possible niche. The first two are from the cliffs at Cape Bauer and the third from the Yanerbie sand hills.

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