Streaky Bay Things to Do

  • Yanerbie sandhills
    Yanerbie sandhills
    by balhannah
  • Point Labatt
    Point Labatt
    by balhannah
  • Point Labatt
    Point Labatt
    by balhannah

Best Rated Things to Do in Streaky Bay

  • dmirebella's Profile Photo

    A history lesson

    by dmirebella Written Aug 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The history of European exploration of the Streaky Bay area starts with the Dutch sailors who accompanied Pieter Nuyts on his 1627 voyage across the Great Australian Bight.

    Nuyts reached the South Australian coast near Streaky Bay before turning westward and heading to the Dutch East Indies. His visit to the area is recalled on the Pieter Nuyts Monument in the median strip on Bay Road near the Streaky Bay Community Hotel.

    Note: It is not Pieter Nuyts, but Matthew Flinders that named the bay because of the streaky discolouration he noticed in the water during his expediation inland Australia!

    Pieter Nuyts Monument
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • School Holidays

    Was this review helpful?

  • dmirebella's Profile Photo

    Jetty way

    by dmirebella Written Aug 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Streaky Bay's jetty provides a nice fishing spot; snapper can be caught from the Streaky Bay jetty between October and December and other seasonal fish as well.

    Dotted along the coast are fine sandy swimming beaches, free beachside camping sites, rock pools, and many rock and surf fishing sites.

    Boat Ramps are located near Streaky Bay to enable the angler to fish the middle of the Bay itself.

    Jetty way
    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • dmirebella's Profile Photo

    Streaky Winter -it isn't what you think!

    by dmirebella Written Aug 27, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visited Streaky during the winter months - well, it was in August so spring was just peeking around the corner ... the sun was shining, the waters were gentle - but yet, there was still a lil nip in the air!

    So here I was - enjoying the sun, in my sweater and Levis ... what a combination.

    Wharf way

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Off to see the scenery

    by iandsmith Written Jun 7, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For our initial foray we headed out for Cape Bauer, past the new housing estate and then through farming land. At last we were to get a look at the ocean and Cape Bauer serves as a dramatic introduction for what you can expect along the rest of the western side of Eyre Peninsula. The sparsely vegetated wind blown cliffs are impressive and eye catching. Their rugged beauty a sign of conglomerate being attacked constantly by the sea; their dangerously underscoured tops having collapsed here and there as if to indicate their true fragility. The swell below breaking on remnants of what were once cliffs but now are merely as speed humps to traffic.
    We were impressed and spent about an hour walking around the dunes and cliff edges, soaking up the atmosphere and the warming autumn sun. With nowhere to fish we finished the loop road and headed back to the info centre.

    At last the ocean
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    I love to be besides the seaside

    by iandsmith Written Jun 13, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    .....and this is a place to love. An excerpt from a story I wrote:
    ' With nowhere to fish we finished the loop road and headed back to the info centre.
    "If you only had half a day, what would you go and see around here?" was the question I put to the lady. Westall Way was her choice and Smooth Pool was one stop she recommended we take. Westall is another loop road, this time a little further south.
    Her enthusiasm for the trail was well founded. Our first stop was at "High Cliffs", another scenic spot though the height wasn't as great as Cape Bauer. We bypassed the "Granites", a popular local surfing and fishing spot, and headed straight for Smooth Pool. If you were constructing a place for a picnic, you couldn't do much better than here. Red rocks, reflective pools, the sea beside you, cliffs in the background and you can drive right up to the shore. The only thing missing are facilities but, since we were in the motorhome, what did we care.
    Fortunately, I had called in at the local pie shop at Streaky Bay for some proper food and this was the chosen site for the feast. Just sitting on the rocks with gull or two for company and watching the world go by. Definitely a place I will return to.'

    Coloured rock of smooth pool Like this all to yourself?  We did. Overview
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The town itself

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pieter Nuyts passed by on his 1627 voyage but it was really when Matthew Flinders was doing a thorough exploration of the area that the European influence began.
    Nuyts' visit to the area is marked by the Pieter Nuyts Monument in the median strip on Bay Road near the Community Hotel.
    Flinders named the bay because of the streaks he noticed in the water, probably only seaweed.
    The other great explorer, after whom the entire peninsula is named, was Edward John Eyre who passed through the area in 1839. His journey is recalled in Eyre's Water Hole which is located about 3 km out of Streaky Bay on the road to Port Kenny. A sign at the rather neat and modern water hole points out that 'At this spot, Baxter, after crossing the peninsula from Port Augusta waited in dire anxiety to rejoin his leader, Edward John Eyre, who had ridden from Mount Arden via Port Lincoln.'
    The area was slowly settled in the second half of the nineteenth century. Farmers came first, then the whalers and, the most successful industry, oyster farming, followed soon after.
    Originally called Flinders, the official name became the even older area tag of Streaky Bay. Today there are definite signs of growth with a new housing estate, lots of tourists (for a village this size) and small industries growing up as a result.
    The only eternal problem here is fresh water, or, more specifically, lack of same.

    In the main street Totem poles Colourful scene
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Out the back

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Once you get over the initial "ooh-aah" and wander over to the semi-obscured examples at the back, you'll find even more interesting shapes.
    You can't help but look at them and try to imagine just how these weird and wonderful granite outcrops could be weathered into such extraordinary shapes by something as simple as wind and, occasionally, water.
    There's a parking area, toilet and an honesty box when you first pull up as it's all on private land and the revenue collected goes solely to the maintenance of the site.

    Note the size of Bob in the background Coming together Strange Colourful lichen
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Pristine white

    by iandsmith Written Jun 13, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As a bonus to our journey we also spent some time doing boys stuff in the sandhills of Yanerbie, another semi-famous local site on the way out of the loop road. These shifting dunes of milk white are a joy to behold. I went a little beserk with my camera and then slid down a steep-sided dune, something I hadn't done for decades. It generates a sense of freedom. It's that sort of place......especially for silly old people like me.
    I let Bob drive from here. Bob had trouble with the gears. By this time I had learned to look away and, when the crunch came, I had an instant mental picture of the engine and gearbox haemorraging. You get used to it after a while.

    Put yourself in the picture Not a footprint in sight It's the scale of the place that overwhelms Just another June
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    More than just haystacks

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Out of the loop and back on the main road there's not a lot to see except straight roads until you come to something that isn't huge but has become a significant attraction in the local area.
    It's called Murphy's Haystacks, a reddish outcrop of granite inselbergs listed as being up to 1,500 million years old and featured in many an item of promotional literature for this part of the world.

    The first group you see Time worn excellence Looks like a bus stop to me
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Fishermans Paradise

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A little further on from Smooth Pool we came across some "civilization".
    We passed the new "housing estate" called, can you believe it, "Fishermans Paradise". The estate consisted of about 4 houses, 3 of which were not yet finished. Where on earth they would get water from in this dry part of Australia's driest state was a mystery to me.
    Still, what an address. It would certainly be a great conversation starter and give you some boasting rights at the bar.

    Been there, done that
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Fishing
    • Diving and Snorkeling

    Was this review helpful?

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    Clinging to life

    by iandsmith Written Jun 20, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One thing that continually attracted us was the diversity of plant life in seemingly hostile regions, especially around the almost barren cliff tops. It once again highlighted the wonder of nature to fill up every possible niche. The first two are from the cliffs at Cape Bauer and the third from the Yanerbie sand hills.

    Colourful succulents Grasping at life Gem in the sand dunes
    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    WESTALL LOOP - WILDLIFE

    by balhannah Updated Oct 14, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just a word of caution, as the weather warms, the Lizards and Snakes come out.

    The names Stumpy-tailed Lizard, Boggi, Sleepy Lizard, Bobtail Lizard, Two-headed Lizard and Pinecone Lizard are all commons name for the Shingleback Lizard.

    We saw several "Stumpy Tailed" lizards crossing the road.
    They move very slowly, SO DO NOT RUN OVER THEM as they are not dangerous to humans and do no harm.If you tease them, and they latch onto your fingers, expect pain!!

    The Lizard has a short, wide stumpy tail that resembles its head, this is to confuse predators. The tail also contains fat reserves, which are drawn upon during hibernation in winter. It is known as a skink, and eats snails and plants and spends much of its time browsing through vegetation for food. It is often seen sunning itself on roadsides or other paved areas.

    I wouldn't mind one in my garden as they do a good job cleaning the area of pests.

    Stumpy tailed Lizard Stumpy tailed Lizard Stumpy tailed Lizard
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    POINT LABATT SEA LIONS

    by balhannah Updated Oct 14, 2014

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    POINT LABATT IN THE GREAT AUSTRALIAN BIGHT, IS ANOTHER MUST SEE!

    We continued onto here after finishing the Westall loop. Still travelling on dirt road, this one became a little rough. Once there though, it was worth the drive, for from the cliff top we looked down upon dozens of Sea Lions basking in the sun. Perhaps it was the time of day, I don't know, but quite a few were waking and heading into the Ocean

    They are Australia's only mainland sea-lion colony, found only in Australia and are one of the rarest seals and Australia's most endangered marine mammals.

    Interpretive signs explain about the Sea Lions. The sea-lion colony at Point Labatt is the only permanent breeding colony on the mainland, with all other colonies on offshore islands.

    BRING BINOCULARS FOR A BETTER VIEW!

    Point Labatt Point Labatt Point Labatt Point Labatt Point Labatt
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MURPHY'S HAYSTACKS

    by balhannah Updated Oct 14, 2014

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the same day we did the Westall Loop and Point Labatt, we finished the day be going to Murphy's Haystacks.

    The name is misleading as Murphy's Haystacks are not haystacks at all but a clump of pink granite boulders that give the appearance of haystacks. Rising out of the hillside, these are known as granite inselbergs dating back 1,500 million years. [The name inselberg comes from German insel, meaning island and berg, mountain.]
    It's believed the ones I saw only date 100,000 years and have been formed by the uneven weathering of crystalline rock as densely fractured compartments break down through weathering.
    The haystacks were buried by calcareous dune sand about 30,000 years ago. Subsequent erosion of the surrounding land surface has gradually revealed the forms we see today.

    They are located on a private farm, so entry is by DONATION. I was more than happy to donate after viewing the unusual shapes, their colours and sizes, WELL WORTH VISITING.

    Murphy's Haystacks Murphy's Haystacks Murphy's Haystacks Murphy's Haystacks Murphy's Haystacks
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE GREAT WHITE SHARK REPLICA

    by balhannah Updated Oct 14, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is located at Stewart's Roadhouse and is FREE TO VIEW.

    It is a life size replica of the world's largest white pointer shark caught on a rod and reel in April 1990
    It took 5 hours of struggle to land the 1520kg female shark on a 24kg line. The Shark was estimated to be between 16 - 18 years old.
    The White Pointer is now a protected species of Shark. They are often seen at Streaky Bay, so it's best to swim in the cordonned off area beside the jetty.

    Also in the display room, is other Streaky Bay sea life including some very large Crabs and Lobsters, I wouldn't want my finger caught in one of their claws.

    This was FREE and well worth a look at!

    The White Pointer The White Pointer
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Streaky Bay

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

42 travelers online now

Comments

Streaky Bay Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Streaky Bay things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Streaky Bay sightseeing.

View all Streaky Bay hotels