Bothwell Things to Do

  • The Municipal Council Chambers, nee library
    The Municipal Council Chambers, nee...
    by iandsmith
  • History unearthed
    History unearthed
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  • Lovely sandstone
    Lovely sandstone
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Most Recent Things to Do in Bothwell

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    The walk

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 14, 2008

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    This building is unique in Australia; it not only serves as the local tourist information centre but it is the historical golf museum as well. The reason for this is that the oldest golf course in Australia is just down the road, a fact not even known by that many golfers I suspect.
    It is here where you should get you walking map of the town. This will make your visit so much more interesting.
    The building itself is the old school house and dates from 1887.

    A sandstone delight
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    On a private note

    by iandsmith Written Feb 3, 2008

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    Elizabeth House is a delightful residence, these days private only but the Georgian roots are clear to see.
    Meanwhile, Pooh Cottage on the hill on the other side of the river is not listed in the historical directory but is plainly of historical interest, if only you could get to see it. The high hedge surrounding precludes this and is evidence that the residents wish to retain their privacy.

    Elizabeth House Pooh Cottage Georgian style
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    St. Luke's Uniting Church

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 3, 2008

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    There's always a lot of history in churches and graveyards. St. Luke's is no exception. What I also found interesting is that the three churches of the town are all in the same block.
    Here it's easy to find the Scottish ancestry, particularly in inscriptions such as you see in pic 4. The infamous "clearances" that led to towns like Bothwell being founded are writ large upon the tombstones here.
    Another thing I couldn't help but notice was the plethora of flowers on so many of the gravestones. You expect it on quite a few but here they were all over the places and in quantity. One suspect it has a lot to do with lineage.
    This building dates from 1837 and, interestingly, the drip stones were carved by Daniel Herbert, the main man responsible for the famous bridge at Ross.
    Lt. Governor Arthur also directed the architect to change the rounded windows because he considered them "un-Christian".

    The tower Stained glass Many a story is writ upon these stones Like pages in a history book
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    A load of old cobblers

    by iandsmith Written Feb 3, 2008

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    There's a wide range of architectural styles in Bothwell, ranging from the stylish library in pic one to the basic cobbler's store in pic two, though the latter is not in its original location, which was adjacent to Elizabeth House.
    It originally belonged to Charles Medhurst and then his son Clarrie and dates from 1897 at least. It was more than a shop, it was a meeting place as well. Clarrie died in 1974.
    On a seat beside the shop there's a poignant plaque that reads: Dedicated to the memory of Percy Marsh 23-10-1917 to 4-9-1988, by his wife Irene, family and friends of Bothwell Cobbler to the last.
    More mundane are the workers' cottages in Elizabeth Street, utilitarian in design and function and still lived in today (pic 3).

    Lovely sandstone Utilitarian design For the workers
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    Surrender? Never

    by iandsmith Written Feb 3, 2008

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    What a wonderful reminder of the past. This was once called "The House of No Surrender" which wasn't a reference to any hostile threat from opposing towns or peoples but the demon drink for this was once the Templar's Hall.
    At the time, 1876, there were four hotels in the town but, by 1886 this building became a shop and residence, fortunately not named after the owner, Mr. James Lemon. It became William's Store.

    History unearthed
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    Signs of the times?

    by iandsmith Written Feb 3, 2008

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    Michael spotted it, the sign that is.
    It was headed "Pushing up Daisies" and went on;
    Have you ever been wondering why the grass is so long in the cemetery?
    (Surprisingly, I hadn't lain awake at night pondering that point!)
    Come along to the local Uniting Church to find out the answer. The Understorey Network and Greening Australia are holding a field day about the native grasslands and why they're so special.
    Find out about the threatened grass species that grow there, join us in seed collecting
    and get involved with monitoring and maintaining the local cemetery.
    Bring: Lunch and a drink
    It was proudly on display along with a few others. There was just one small problem. It was for two years' previous!
    I reflected that that probably summed up Boswell. A town stuck in an historical time warp where nothing really happens very quickly but the relaxed attitude is also part of the attraction.
    This building was once the Literary Society Building and housed a collection of books which formed the oldest country library in Australia. The society was formed in 1834 and moved into here in 1856.

    The Municipal Council Chambers, nee library
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    Georgian

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Though these days the Falls of Clyde is a private residence it was first licensed as an inn in 1836. The current owners have it in a fine state of preservation.
    The next building of note along Dalrymple Street is on the corner of Alexander. It is the old P.O. building with hitching rail and dates back to 1891

    Fine example of Georgian architecture The old P.O.
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    The colour of it all

    by iandsmith Written Jan 18, 2008

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    One thing you'll notice from time to time in your walk is the lovely colours of the flowers. Naturally enough, this statement applies in spring and summer rather than the chilly months.
    At Bothwell, as in the rest of Tasmania, roses are abundant and there seems to be a predeliction for the smaller climbing variety (pic 3).

    Red hot poker Delicate hues Roses everywhere
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    The pub

    by iandsmith Written Jan 12, 2008

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    Now it's time to start walking and, as you head to where Market Place meets the main road you'll notice there are two stores on opposite corners, both selling similar stuff.
    It's quite extraordinary in a town this size that the two "supermarkets", service stations and general store should be so close but, that's Bothwell.
    The one on the south side is on the site of the White Hart Inn with a stone storehouse out the back dating from 1837.
    The Bothwell Garage, on the north side, was once a general store only and dates from the 1890's
    Next to one of them is the standout Castle Hotel, continuously licenced since 1829, making it one of Australia's oldest.
    You will also notice while walking that the signposts are done in tartan to denote the Scots heritage.

    Love those signs The hotel
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    Moving out

    by iandsmith Written Jan 12, 2008

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    At 350 m above sea level Bothwell can be cool in winter, sitting on a relatively exposed plain as it is. Though it's just 74 km north of Hobart (using the Midland Highway - the town is located 21 km from Melton Mowbray on the A5).
    Bothwell is a quiet farming town that would like to get more tourism, though its proximity to the best trout fishing in Australia does mean some tourists roll through. It was named after a town in Lanarkshire, Scotland by Governor George Arthur in 1824.
    In the area of the tourist centre you can start by admiring the headmaster's residence - 1887 - (opening pic), take in the lovely sandstone churches (St. Michaels pictured) then, if you want to do some shopping, drop in across the other side of the park and call in to White's Store (pic 3).
    For over 150 years this was in the same family and the flagged "bloodstone" footpath and shop windows are original. Recently it has been bought and turned into a craft store which, although it features hand knitted woollen items, has lots of other interesting things in it such as paintings, books and local produce.

    Headmaster's residence Church White's Store, circa 1830's
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Bothwell Things to Do

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