Corinna Travel Guide

  • Starting out
    Starting out
    by iandsmith
  • Lovers Falls were but a trickle
    Lovers Falls were but a trickle
    by iandsmith
  • The kayaking option
    The kayaking option
    by iandsmith

Corinna Things to Do

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    Lovers Falls were but a trickle 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Nov 17, 2013

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    This enticingly named area is only reachable by boat, ideally a kayak such as you can hire from the store at Corinna, as we did though I had a blow up one in my motorhome. Cost in 2013 was $40 for half a day which is plenty of time to reach the falls and get back or, as we did, leave the kayak or canoe at Savage River wharf where a launch will pick it up later in the day and you can walk back along the Savage River Trail.
    When we visited it was about the driest it had been for years and merely a trickle cascaded down the cliff but it was still worthwhile to see the area and its magnificent tree ferns and experience the canyon and its other delights.
    You have to walk in from the river on a well made and safe boardwalk that has probably about 100 steps.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Kayaking

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    landscape beside the walk 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Mar 5, 2011

    A short walk from Corinna, the Huon Pine Walk, has recently been upgraded and is accessible by wheelchairs. The Huon Pine Walk, which carries interpretation signs on the important local flora, can be completed in 15 to 20 minutes.
    The Savage River Walk that continues on from the Huon Pine Walk has just been completed. It is an amazing transect of primary rainforest that offers a fresh dimension compared to the other walks. The 3km trek to the Savage River traverses huge myrtle beech and old huon pine and has magnificent views of the Pieman River from the ridges. The walk terminates at the site where the SS Croydon was sunk at the mouth of the Savage River. The wreck is still visible. The return walk can take about three hours, so many guests use the drop off and pick up service by boat to make this a one way walk. Better still, kayak down and walk back taking in the rainforest from two completely different perspectives.
    It's also hilly so don't expect to be taking a wheelchair beyond the Huon Pine Walk.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Under the 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Feb 20, 2011

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    The cruise takes you to Pieman Heads and the dozen or so leases that fisher folk have there along with their quirky nature; like the bus that they dragged on a pontoon from Corinna on a pontoon, wheeled it over to a spot and then built a house (so called) around it.
    The beach here is littered with logs, for when they come down the river it’s onshore winds that predominate and so they are doomed to a life on the sand; I would like to have said they were also sunbaking but, since it rains here 5 days out of 7, there’s little time for that.

    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

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Corinna Favorites

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    Deep in the forest 4 more images

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 22, 2011

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    Favorite thing: We later did the Whyte River walk, a delightful 1½ hour stroll beneath a dense canopy where ferns and native laurel are in abundance around the trunks of the charismatic myrtle, the most photographed trees in Tasmania. The laurel, like leatherwood, is endemic to Tasmania, as is the flat grass, an aquatic plant that grows only in three rivers in Tasmania but lines the banks for kilometres here.

    Fondest memory: The Sassafras Tree (Sassafras officinale)
    The name 'Sassafras,' applied by the Spanish botanist Monardes in the sixteenth century, is said to be a corruption of the Spanish word for saxifrage. The tree stands from 20 to 40 feet high, with many slender branches, and smooth, orange-brown bark. The leaves are broadly oval, alternate, and 3 to 7 inches long. The flowers are small, and of an inconspicuous, greenish yellow colour.
    Besides usages in fragrances and cosmetic toiletries, the oil of Sassafras is chiefly used for flavouring purposes - it is employed for flavouring effervescing drinks. Most Americans and Southeast Asians would know it as the more familiar Sarsaparilla or "Sarsi" flavoured candies & beverages. Take a small piece of bark or a piece of leaf and crushed it/rubbed between your palms and smell the lovely aroma of Sassafras oil!
    They're a little bit like the myrtle only without the lumps and they don't grow as thick.

    All the pics here are panoramas so you need to click on to them to see the full picture.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Hygrocybe Firma fungus 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Feb 20, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Towards the end of the trail we came across numerous fungi, from white to brown to orange to red and all shapes and sizes; they really are a weird species but delightful to look at. And sadly that was it. The next day the storms rolled in and we headed north.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    Patterns in the rocks 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Feb 20, 2011

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    Favorite thing: I managed to walk to the picturesque rocks at the southern end before I had to return for lunch and the trip back up the Pieman, named incidentally after a convict who escaped from Macquarie Penal Settlement with seven others. While 2 gave themselves up the others continued and eventually one made it to Hobart where Alexander “The Pieman” Pearce confessed to eating his comrades after he was caught. The judge didn’t believe him thinking that they were still alive and bushranging and so sent him back to Sarah Island where he escaped again less than a year later with a young convict named Thomas Cox. Just ten days later they recaptured him, this time with bits of Cox in his pockets.
    He was sent to Hobart and hanged where he is purported to have said, “Man’s flesh is delicious. It tastes far better than fish or pork,”......I’ve always said you just can’t tell what you get in pies....

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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