Fun things to do in Hobart

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    Enjoy downtown Hobart by strolling about

    by fred98115 Written Jul 12, 2014

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    Our cruise ship arrived mid-day which gave us the chance to stroll around the town, run a few errands to buy necessities, and just enjoy the ambiance of the town. It is a pleasant place to visit. My camera walks with me, so I found subjects at the port and downtown to be of interest. My gear is a DSLR with a zoom lens. No tripod, it would just be in the way and attract too much attention in an urban environment. Travel light and be respectful of your subjects.

    Franklin Wharf St David's Central Business District Crane at Franklin Wharf Salamanca Place
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    Terhune's Air Walk

    by fred98115 Written Jul 12, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Previous visitors told horror stories about rain, winds, shaking structure, long drive, etc. We boarded our excursion bus (we were on a cruise) to go to the park and walk in the canopy. Windshield wipers were sweeping as we drove, but our walk was in a gentle mist and windless. Euchalyptus trees were around us in all directions as we walked through the canopy, The scaffolding was safe and the views ... well, check out the photos.

    Photographers: my gear is a DSLR with a zoom lens and no tripod. The zoom wide-angle was useful as was the slight telephoto. The tripod was not missed.

    Air walk Huon River Air Walk Trees seen from the walk On the Trail to the Air Walk
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    South Bruny Island (Cape Bruny) Lighthouse

    by sirgaw Written May 28, 2014

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    Lady Gaw was not amused when it was suggested that our trip to Bruny Island should include a visit to South Bruny Island Lighthouse. “They are such windy places,” she complained, but I was resolute in my desire. After all SWMBO (she who must be obeyed) was frequently visiting shops and has easily qualified for the Aussie Olympic Team – events sprint, middle distance and Marathon shopping.

    The drive through The Bruny Island landscape was a hurried affair, as we had crammed a lot into our one day visit to the island.

    We arrived at the small car park adjacent to the former light keepers cottages, stores etc and after a brief exploration of the small but very interesting museum, walked the several hundred metres to the base of the lighthouse. Perhaps as lighthouses go this is not particularly tall, however it was built on top of very high sea cliffs and I can say the view is well-worth the pain of the drive to and from (sorry Lady Gaw and relatives).

    Web site below is part of the excellent Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife service site with an amazing variety of information on all of the national parks in the state and I strongly suggest visiting the site before going to Tasmania. Note that a current National Parks Pass should be displayed on dashboard of car and can be purchased at the entry into the South Bruny National Park – the rangers can issue a fine if no pass is displayed. More details on my Tasmanian page - National Parks Pass.

    Built 1836 . . . . . . and still standing sentinel. Light keepers cottages, stores etc. Amazing coastal scenery. Formally operated by Comm of Aust.
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    Bruny Island 'Truganini Lookout'

    by sirgaw Written May 28, 2014

    There is a small car park adjacent to the main road soon after entering the gravel section and well sign posted. Suggest you park the car and, take your time and slowly climb the 200 + wooden steps to the view from the lookout, which is great. The Neck as it is known is a narrow strip of land that separates North and South Bruny Island and in parts is not much wider than the 2 lane gravel road that is the main highway. I was told there is considerable animosity between residents in the north and south of the island, which has a permanent population of only 600.

    The view is 360 degrees and can be seen on line at https://www.360cities.net/image/bruny-island-neck-1#-192.88,17.34,95.3

    Adjacent to the wooden platform lookout is a memorial plaque and cairn commemorating Truganini (1812 – 1876), perhaps the most famous person born on Bruny Island who is credited as being the last of the full blood Tasmanian Aboriginals. It is fitting that the spectacular lookout bears her name. More information on Truganini at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truganini

    The area surrounding the lookout on the Southern Ocean side is also a Little Penguin (sometimes called Fairy Penguin) rookery. The penguins come ashore at dusk to feed their chicks September to February. There is a small toilet block and camping ground.

    The lookout is a Bruny Island must-do - more details on Bruny tourism and information on web site below.

    Magnificent view from the top Part of the lookout structure Looking up to at least 200 steps. Pounding surf on the Southern Ocean side. Calm waters of the D���entrecasteaux Channel
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    Bruny Island

    by sirgaw Written May 28, 2014

    As far as Bruny Island is concerned there are 2 HUGE mistakes. The first is not to the island when visiting Tasmania and the second, for which I am now guilty as charged, is to only visit there for one day.

    Bruny Island – almost 50 km in length - has a permanent population of only 600 and the main road (gravel in many parts) is around 100 km from the northern end at Dennes Point, to the spectacular cliffs and lighthouse at Cape Bruny in the south where the next land fall is Antarctica.

    Access to the island is by ferry from Kettering (separate tip) which takes around 15 minutes while crossing the sheltered D’entrecasteaux channel. Although we turned off to visit Dennes Point and to get away from the peak minute traffic snarls, the main road from the island ferry terminal at Roberts Point is fully sealed all the way to the very spectacular Bruny Island Truganini Lookout (separate tip). The road passes a number business properties involved in food production along the yummy ‘Made on Bruny gourmet trail.’ Sorry to say I did not visit any of the producer’s establishments on the island, but did sample some of their delicious wares at Salamanca Market in Hobart.

    The main road turned to gravel on ‘the neck,’ which is a narrow strip of land that joins north and south Bruny Island. On one side of the neck are the roaring Southern Ocean and the other, the quiet waters of the D’entrecasteaux Channel. The road again becomes sealed soon after driving onto south Bruny and soon after there is a fork in the road.

    The left fork follows the pounding seascape of the Southern Ocean along Adventure Bay. Well named Round Cape provides protection from the Ocean and becomes quite sheltered – so sheltered that Captain James Cook landed in the area in 1778 and anchored for 2 days. Seems he committed an act of vandalism and carved his initials on the trunk of a tree – nature had its revenge and the tree was destroyed by bush fire in the early 1900’s. A plaque records the event – relative of Lady Gaw had heard a statue had been erected in the area – all we could find was a telephone box where after searching for the right number, the caller could say, “ ‘Stat You Cook.” It was a poor joke but I did get a laugh.

    We had a picnic lunch in the car as the wind was too strong to eat and enjoy the delicious array of goodies on offer. After our brush with Cook and the small township at Adventure Bay where frequently the Bruny Island high speed Cruise passes very close to the highest sea cliffs in Australia (video at http://www.brunyisland.org.au/attractions/bruny-island-cruises/ ) we journeyed back to the fork and continued on to the small town of Alonnah where we had a coffee at the only hotel on the island. Sadly service was very slow, but the pub was very busy for a Monday early afternoon – judging by the crowd of ‘oldies’ I suspect a tour bus was in town at the same time. I’d like to return to that hotel and enjoy their meals as our relatives had praised the establishment. With the ‘crime’ of only one day on the island, I wanted to visit as much as we could.

    After coffee we hit the road for the lighthouse at the southern end of the island. After travelling through the settlement of Lunawanna – again we hit the gravel road much to the ‘annoyance’ of Lady Gaw who really does like straight and smooth roads. Sir Gaw, on the other hand, was quite happy to try out for a new career as a rally driver – and I had fun!!!! The country side had changed to a more sparsely settled area and there were a number of ‘renovators delight’ properties that we passed and 3 are subject of separate tip ‘Bruny Island real estate’, which is actually meant as a bit of fun.

    The road deteriorated into almost a bush track in parts and the more windy and rough it became the happier I was – judging from the tut tuting from Lady Gaw and her relatives, they were not amused – LOL Lady Gaw was even less than impressed when I kindly told her that the road was the second most southerly in Australia for ‘normal’ vehicles and that on the morrow I wished to drive along the most southerly road to Cockle Creek – then the riot began – LOL (Lady Gaw won and we didn’t travel that road, however I got my revenge when I drove to Hells Gate and return some days later – see my Strahan pages for details)

    We arrived at the very spectacular Cape Bruny Lighthouse reserve (separate tip) at 3.22 (digital photo record) and left there at 4.10. According to the excellent ‘Bruny Island – discover the south’ map and information leaflet the trip to the Roberts Point ferry should take 70 minutes, so I figured I had a few minutes to snap off a few photos for my ‘Bruny Island real estate’ tip. The last house was photographed at 4.59.28pm just outside the Alonnah Township with the suggested travel time to ferry of 35 minutes – it was going to be a close race to beat that outgoing ferry. My next photo was taken after I’d stopped the car 3 car spots back from the ferry boarding point and ran down to take the photo – time 5.29.16pm AND the &^%$# ferry had already left on its 5.30pm departure. SirGaw did let loose with some well-chosen words as we had to wait another hour for the next ferry.

    I have included a web site for Bruny Island tourism. With all that is on offer on the island I’d strongly suggest at least an overnight stay in one of the islands 17 accommodation providers. OK why not 2 or 3 nights and experience everything.

    For Lafy Gaw a little on line research has uncovered an Aboriginal sentence for you – “Taungurung ba moom mallee,” which loosely translates in English to, ‘Sit down, shut up and HANG ON.’

    Balcony view from relatives former home Deserted beach Amazing coastal scenery And again Next stop and way south
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    Bellerive Beach

    by swissfondue Updated Dec 4, 2013

    Hobart is built around a beautiful deep water harbour and beaches are close to the city centre.

    One of the most popular is Bellerive Beach. On summer evenings hundreds of people walk the length of the beach, exercise and play with their dogs. Blundstone Arena which Hobarts premier sporting facility (football and cricket) is located just metres from the beach.

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    Wrest Point Entertainment Centre and Hotel/Casino

    by AusPinay Written Jul 23, 2013

    This place is Hobart's premier entertainment centre- with an iconic hotel, conference and entertainment centre located in an ideal setting- on the shores of Derwent River. It has all the essentials for a fun and and comfy stay or visit in the city, within Sandy Bay, where most of the wealthy homes are also found!

    We visited this place quite a few times now- first to have buffet dinner to celebrate our mate's birthday and then to watch a show. I shall be reviewing the coffee shop and the show venue separately.

    But do go and drop by this place or even stay a night or two or more- there's plenty to do, having a casino, watch a show where big name performers are featured, eat at any of several dining areas/cafes/bistro/buffet places- for breeky, lunch, dinner or snack.

    It is a huge place with ample parking space and friendly staff too. You can also be a member of their Federal Rewards Club which is free- and avail of discounts and get points as well for patronising their many venues/restaurants, casino, pokies, etc.

    my mates and I enjoying a night out there interiors of Wrest Point near one of many lounges superb Bootleg Beatles show
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    More boat festival

    by iandsmith Written Feb 18, 2013

    There was so much going on from stalls to performers to magnificient boats it's all a bit too much to list. However, if you'll take my advice, go and have a look someday, you won't be disappointed.
    Here are some more shots from the festival.
    You could go on board many of the vessels and have a look, as we did, one picture here is from the Lady Nelson replica.

    The Windeward Bound Below decks on the Lady Nelson What's a festival without a pipe band They were all shapes and sizes The
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    VISIT THE HISTORICAL SHOT TOWER

    by DennyP Written Nov 13, 2011

    Taroona A short drive out of the city of Hobart along the Channel highway brings you to Taroona a quiet town that is a commuter town on the fringes of Hobart. After the second World War many returned soldiers settled the area and today is a commuter town with little commercial buisinesses.
    Built in 1870 by Joseph Moir , an early immigrant to Van Diemans Land Moir was a noted builder, Ironmonger and shot manufacturer. The "Shot Tower" that he built for his shot making buisiness is located in the town of Taroona. This"Shot Tower" is the towns most Historical building and this is where musket balls were made for the early military needs. Apparently at the top of the tower molten lead was poured through various sized seives and as the molten lead fell the height of the tower into cold water at the bottom it had taken on a circular shape for the ammunition needed.The walk to the top of the tower exposes a wonderful view out over the Derwent Estuary.

    Taroona is also the place where Mary The Crown Princess of Denmark grew up and went to school at the local Taroona High School before going on to further her education and persuing a degree at the University of Tasmania.

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    Tasman Bridge

    by The_Downunder_Mob Updated Aug 5, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tasman Bridge over the Derwent River was built in the 1960's due to increasing traffic to the growing suburbs on the eastern shore. It was opened with 4 vehicular lanes in 1964.

    On Sunday 5 January 1975, at 9:27 p.m. AEST, the Tasman Bridge was struck by the bulk ore carrier Lake Illawarra It caused two pylons and three sections of concrete decking, totaling 127 metres (417 ft), to fall from the bridge and sink the ship. Seven of the ship's crewmen were killed, and five motorists died when four cars drove over the collapsed sections before the traffic was stopped.

    The depth of the river at this point (35 metres (115 ft) is such that the wreck of Lake Illawarra still lies on the bottom, with concrete slab on top of it, without presenting a navigation hazard to smaller vessels.

    Reconstruction started in October 1975 and the bridge was reopened in October 1977.

    http://www.ccc.tas.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=424

    I like bridges and think this one is beautifuland deceptively simple. 'Things to see' - I think so.

    Tasman Bridge Tasman Bridge Tasman Bridge Tasman Bridge Tasman Bridge
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    Tasman Bridge

    by The_Downunder_Mob Written Aug 5, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tasman Bridge over the Derwent River was built in the 1960's due to increasing traffic to the growing suburbs on the eastern shore. It was opened with 4 vehicular lanes in 1964.

    On Sunday 5 January 1975, at 9:27 p.m. AEST, the Tasman Bridge was struck by the bulk ore carrier Lake Illawarra It caused two pylons and three sections of concrete decking, totaling 127 metres (417 ft), to fall from the bridge and sink the ship. Seven of the ship's crewmen were killed, and five motorists died when four cars drove over the collapsed sections before the traffic was stopped.

    The depth of the river at this point (35 metres (115 ft) is such that the wreck of Lake Illawarra still lies on the bottom, with concrete slab on top of it, without presenting a navigation hazard to smaller vessels.

    Reconstruction started in October 1975 and the bridge was reopened in October 1977.

    http://www.ccc.tas.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=424

    I like bridges and think this one is beautifuland deceptively simple. 'Things to see' - I think so.

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    Kangaroo Bluff Battery

    by The_Downunder_Mob Written Aug 5, 2011

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    As history tells, the sighting of two Russian warships in the Derwent harbour in 1873 prompted the consrtuction of the Kangaroo Bluff Battery. Construction started in 1800 with the first shot fired in 1884. The battery was manned until the 1920's having never fired a shot in anger. It now exists as an Historic Site.

    Much of the original construction remains and you can get great views of Hobart CBD from across the Derwent River.

    Free entry between 9.00am and 5.00pm daily.

    Kangaroo Bluff Battery Kangaroo Bluff Battery Kangaroo Bluff Battery Kangaroo Bluff Battery
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    Bonarong Wildlife Park

    by The_Downunder_Mob Written Jul 30, 2011

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    Bonarong Wildlife Park is a showcase of Aussie wildlife. It is not a zoo but a sanctuary established in 1981 for the care of sick and injured wildlife. It is run soley on the generosity of visitors and patrons.

    There are regular shows by the animal keepers and petting, even some cuddling is allowed. They are dedicated to saving the Tasmanian Devil from the Facial Tumor disease which is threatening to wipe out the species.

    Although there are better native animal parks in Australia I enjoyed my visit to Bonarong. The park is clean and the animals are well cared for. The staff are friendly and helpful.

    Kangaroo and joey Echidna Tasmanian Devil Emu Kookaburra
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    The Tasman Memorial

    by The_Downunder_Mob Written Jul 30, 2011

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    Abel Janszoon Tasman (1603 – 1659) was a Dutch seafarer, explorer, and merchant. He is famous for his voyages of discovery on behalf of the Dutch East India Company and is credited with the discovery of Tasmania (in 1643) which he called Van Dieman's Land in honour of the governor of the Company.

    The memorial includes a statue of Abel Tasman, a fountain and a stone scultpure.

    The fountain was a gift to Tasmania as part of the Australian bicentennial celebrations and was opened by Her Majesty Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands on 27th October 1988.

    A stone sculpture, which is also part of the memorial, was unveiled on the Netherlands national day of 30th April 1992 to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the sighting and landing on Van Dieman’s Land by Abel Tasman.

    The Tasman Memorial - Hobart Abel Tasman - Tasman Memorial - Hobart The Tasman Memorial - Hobart The Tasman Memorial - Hobart The Tasman Memorial - Hobart
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    Charlie & the chocolate factory? No it's Cadbury..

    by yann.ng Updated Apr 4, 2011

    You can join a Chocolate Factory tour where you'll be shown the different section of the chocolate manufacturing process and be given free chocolate samples. After the tour, you may purchase their products in consumer or bulk quantities at factory discounts.

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