Museums., Hobart

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    by AusPinay
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    cute meercat can be touched here
    by AusPinay
  • Museums.
    by AusPinay
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    Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

    by bijo69 Written Jan 31, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tasmanian Museum is a great place to visit on a rainy day. It's hosted in Hobart's oldest building, the Commissariat Store from 1808.
    It features some interesting exhibits on the indigenous people and the convict history of Tasmania.
    You can also watch a video of the last Thylacinus Cynocephalus, the Tasmanian Tiger, who died in the Hobart Zoo in the 1930s.
    The Museum is open daily from 10am to 5pm and admission is free.

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    Free Entry: The Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery

    by xuessium Updated Oct 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    TasmanianMuseum&ArtGallery

    I confess: I have NEVER been inside this museum. I always tell myself I will go see the place but something else always take my attention away.

    The museum was established by The Royal Society of Tasmania. This is the oldest Royal Society outside England and was established by Sir John Franklin, the explorer.

    If you are ever in Hobart and likes visiting museums and galleries, give this place a whirl.
    The architecture itself is worth a look.

    Opening hours (entrance 40 Macquarie Street):
    10am-5pm daily except Good Friday, ANZAC Day (25th April) and Christmas Day (25th December)

    General Admission is FREE.
    Charges are made for some special exhibitions.

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    • Architecture
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    Breakfast for a Cause at MONA

    by AusPinay Written Apr 15, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    with the former reality star Brynne Edelstein
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    The Annual Breakfast for Hope held recently at the MONA in Berriedale organised by the Fight Cancer Foundation was a roaring success with special guest Brynne Edelsten (Star of My Bedazzled Life) with around a hundred guests attending to raise funds for the John Opie House to benefit cancer patients and their families.

    We got to meet the former reality star and promoted a good cause- fighting cancer.

    The rest of my article at AUSINFORMER.COM:

    Showing up in crutches with a bandaged sore foot, Edelsten, smarting a casual outfit- peach jacket on a stripey long dress till gladly posed for photos with some of the patrons and supporters of the fund raising event.

    They hoped to raise $15,000 for the “home away from home” place in Murray Street, Hobart for Tasmanian patients and their families who have to travel to Hobart for medical treatment.

    Samantha Kanizay, one of the event’s organisers told AUSINFORMER that Brynne herself donated $2,000 to the project and around 20 local businesses and social groups served as donors among them the Caring Quilters, Frogmore Creek Wines, Invidia Hair,Southern Cross Television Network, and many more who gave prizes for the raffle held on the day.

    Major prizes included a wheelbarrow of goodies from Mitre 10 in Kingston and an autographed copy of Ron Barassi’s Autobiography. Shopping vouchers from $125 to $250 were also given by the generous sponsors-Jan and Lloyd Clark, Meadowbank Estate, Ella Bache Hobart and Alberto and Natalia Vanetti of Invidia Hair.

    Held at the Eros and Thanos rooms of the MONA (Museum of Old and New Art) , guests paid $60 for single tickets and $550 for a table of ten with about 15 tables booked for this years fund raising. A wait staff said Ms Edelsten sipped some champagne and had some scrambled eggs. The blonde and buxom socialite had been in the limelight again for her “new trimmed look.”

    Brynne told this writer it was her first time to visit Tasmania and she liked it, but wouldn’t have much time to look around yet as her relatives were in Australia visiting too.

    She said she’s always been a supporter of worthy causes and projects like this event and so she didn’t hesitate to agree being involved with Breakfast for Hope.

    In the reality show “My Bedazzled Life”, the then 29-year-old wide eyed girl from Phoenix, Arizona, and Geoffrey, 69, her multimillionaire husband shared their life to the public to reveal their extraordinarily glamorous lifestyle at their luxury penthouse apartment.

    Brynne has appeared in several showbiz television programs like Dancing with the Stars and other Red Carpet affairs often resplendent in eye-catching wardrobes at the TV Week Logie Awards, the AFL Brownlow Medal and the Melbourne Cup , among others.


    MONA is a a delightful venue as aside from its wonderful exhibits, it also has accommodation packages for tourists, a winery, restaurant and pavillions for various functions. It is located at 655 Main Road, Berriedale, Tasmania, Australia.
    Contact

    +61 (3) 6277 9900
    info@mona.net.au
    Opening Hours

    Wed-Mon
    10am-6pm

    Website-http://www.mona.net.au/

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    Tasmania Museum

    by iandsmith Written Mar 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lovely aesthetic lines

    This beautiful sandstone museum down by Constitution Dock was established by The Royal Society of Tasmania. This is the oldest Royal Society outside England and was established by Sir John Franklin, the famous explorer.
    If you are in Hobart and visiting museums is your go, give this place a whirl.

    Opening hours :
    10am-5pm daily except Good Friday, ANZAC Day (25th April) and Christmas Day (25th December)

    General Admission is FREE.
    Charges are made for some special exhibitions.

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    Phone: 61-3-62114177
    Address: 40 Macquarie Street, GPO Box 1164, Hobart
    Directions: Right by the jetties/docks.
    Website: http://www.tmag.tas.gov.au/
    Other Contact: email: tmagmail@tmag.tas.gov.au

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Zoodoo Wildlife Park

    by AusPinay Written May 11, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    cute meercat can be touched here
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    This place is amazing, the main attraction are the cute meercats but the best part of the visit is hands on experience feeding and touching the animals.

    Aside from the meercats, you get to ride a open top safari bus with a driver and helper who also serve as tour guide and gives a great experience feeding the larger animals like the very wild emus, camels, llamas, kangaroos, etc. Small animals are also available to cuddle like the guinea pigs, rabbits, etc. They have tigers, lions and giraffes too. It may be a small zoo but trust me, your visit will be memorable!

    It's a lovely place, far from the noisy city and with wide open spaces. It is clean too and has picnic areas and toilets, a cafe and souvenir shop.

    Just be aware that it is in a dirt road so four wheel driving is advisable. There was a blackout when we were there but we still enjoyed ourselves. So take your own food as we were not able to taste the nice pies on display as they cannot heat them up. It was also a very windy time when we were there so make sure your wear ample warm clothes or wind breakers.

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    • Zoo
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Maritime Museum

    by Kate-Me Written Apr 11, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We found this a most informative and worthwhile museum. It gave us a better feel of Hobart and especially its history, which we didn't have until we went here.
    The tour is self guided with printed out information, so you can wander through at your leisure.

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  • MONA - Museum of Old and New Art

    by EddyB Written Oct 3, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Possible the best museum and art gallery in Australia! The largest private collection of art and artefacts in the Southern Hemisphere. And it is located in a vineyard only a few miles from Hobart CBD - BLISS.
    Art, Artifacts, vineyard, restaurant, cafe, wine tasting, beer tasting, bar
    You can take a ferry from the docks in Hobart , spend a day there...

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    Channel Heritage Centre

    by AusPinay Written Aug 11, 2013
    very educational little museum
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    Find out more about the history of the channel region/Kingsborough Council areas in this quaint but interesting museum. For just a donation, you can browse through the various exhibits and take a walk in time as the region developed - its culture, the livelihood that flourished, how people lived, etc.

    First sighted by European explorers - Abel Janzoon Tasman the first Dutchman in 1642 - Tasmania and the Channel has been visited by a number of explorers.

    Not least is Bruni d’Entrecasteaux who lends his name to the channel itself and the island which forms its eastern shore.

    Details:

    Open daily 10am till 4pm

    (except Christmas Day and Easter Friday)

    Free entry

    Bring your family and friends for a day of superb historical and social signifiacne and learning for all of you!

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    Wooden Boat Festival 2013

    by iandsmith Written Feb 18, 2013
    Love letters in the sand
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    This festival is becoming ever more popular. Shame it's only every second year but, that's better than nothing.
    The array of craft has to be seen to be believed. Personally I'm not a boat fanatic but you can't help but be taken in by the general festivity of the place and the passion of the wooden boat people.
    My personal favourite is always the lady playing the piano on the back of a wooden boat, this time accompanied by a washboard player and a piano accordion and mostly singing "Love Letters in The Sand".
    There's always a few multiple masted vessels and really odd stuff. For me, the odd stuff award was between "Notorious" from Geelong and a replica Viking craft from Russia, both way out there.

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    MONA (Museum of Old and New Art)

    by sirgaw Written May 26, 2014
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    If you are a fan of MONA (Museum of Old and New Art) may I suggest you read no further!

    In all fairness MONA is a unique attraction in a very unique building that, one inside, reminded me of a bomb-proof bunker as used by the Americans or Russian during the cold war. Perhaps that was the idea – so that no one could destroy it from the air at least and, when all else fails during a nuclear fallout, much of the population of Hobart could be housed in relative safety

    One of the most popular ways of getting to MONA is by the MONA ROMA ferry (see separate tip) and a warning – there are 99 steps from the wharf to the entrance way (photo) and before you start descending into the bunker to start gawking at what some people call art. Maybe if someone had some sense they would have constructed a tunnel from the wharf directly into the museum and that would have saved a lot of foot leather.

    Once we’d exchanged our free tickets (well, lets tell the truth – it was part of an accommodation package), we gathered up a visitors guide and followed the crowd to a spiral staircase that led to we knew not what. Somehow we had stumbled upon a queue for the ‘Death Gallery’ where only 2 people were admitted at any one time. It was quite a spooky experience with an Egyptian mummy and a digital ‘likeness’ taking centre place with a noose (photo) and a poem titled ‘The Butterfly.’ I left that gallery totally confused!

    Close by was a large wall displaying fast moving images of text which I guessed were details of people fictitious or not – again I left that gallery totally confused!

    There was a ‘strange odour’ and so we followed our protesting noses to a gallery that contained what can only be best described as a ‘poo machine’ (photo). This seemed to consist of an industrial ‘thing’ that started off with a clear liquid bowl and progressively gurgled, burped and churned a brownish mix and in the end came out as poo complete with poo odour – if you get my meaning. Please don’t give McDonalds any ideas but maybe it was the makings of a Big Mac – again I left that gallery totally confused!

    One of the strangest installations (if that is what they call ‘them’) was a largish room with bookshelves lining every part of the walls except for the doorway and in the centre at least one large table surrounded by chairs. The bookshelves and table(s) all contained bound books of all shapes and sizes made entirely of blank paper including the covers and spines. The ‘books’ were piled high and left open on the table – again I left that gallery totally confused!

    Was there anything that I did enjoy about MONA – yes in all fairness:
    A headless sand sculpture but I left that gallery totally confused.
    Outside the Roy Grounds Round House a so called chapel (photo) that we could not get to.
    A water feature that sprayed out words with large drops of water (photo).
    I could add the words – the exit sign – but I guess you’ve already got the message.

    Our trip to Tassie included 2 nights and only one full day at Cradle Mountain. I really wish, in hindsight that I had given MONA a miss and used that day at Cradle where nature’s REAL art is on display, rather than much of the galleries that I did not understand or really enjoy - I left those galleries totally confused!

    Below are contact details – if you must.

    Please note that there are reduced prices for old fa*ts who may feel quite at home visiting the gallery containing the 'poo machine'.

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    Channel Heritage Centre

    by sirgaw Written May 27, 2014
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    As regional museums go, the Channel Heritage Centre is a beauty with plenty to see for the old and young alike.

    Located along the busy Channel Highway and only a short drive south from the centre of Margate Township, the heritage centre has a prominent position and only 15 minutes drive from central Hobart. Admittance is free, however donations are most welcome.

    The displays in the centre commence with the early exploration of the very scenic D’entrecasteaux channel. I commented to a hard-working volunteer that there was no mention of the famous Captain James Cook and his 2 day stay on what is now called Bruny Island in 1778 and I quickly found myself politely embroiled in a museum version of a ‘turf war.’ Seems there are demarcation disputes between the various museums and Cook et al are mentioned in the museum at Adventure Bay on Bruny. I should have been keel hauled for my error – LOL

    Lady Gaw and I saw a large number of items on display from the 1950’s – 60’s – the time that we were both growing up and using the very appliances and other items now on display in a museum – even some of the horrible tasting medicines that we were forced to take (photo). Maybe we are both destined to be permanently on display in a museum judging from our combined and not revealed age.

    In 1967 the area and parts of Hobart were devastated by bush fires that unfortunately are part and parcel of life in Australia. There were many photos and artifacts remembering those terrible times.

    Some of the other displays centered on early schooling in the area (photo of school room desk complete with ink well), work in the area including whaling and apple growing, communications and transport, post WW2 Dutch settlement in the area, an extensive camera exhibition and much, much more.

    We really could have spent many happy hours browsing in all that the centre has to off – but sadly we had to leave and after a quick look in the obligatory gift shop and a tantalizing sniff in the café we left.

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    Hobart Penitentiary Chapel

    by sirgaw Updated Jun 19, 2014
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    For those interested in the convict past, and in addition to the very moving Port Arthur, the Hobart Penitentiary Chapel is a must visit. It was an important section of the former and much larger Old Hobart Gaol, which operated on the site from 1821 to 1963. In fact the old gaol predates Port Arthur penal colony, which commenced in 1833.

    Former Tasmanian colonial Governor, George Arthur, saw himself as the goaler for the entire Island – and the island was in reality a very large gaol. Convicts would arrive by sailing ship from England where they’d been transported for very minor crimes. They would be marched up the hill to the former Hobart Gaol where they’d be processed and after a short stay, sent off to various towns, hamlets and settlers properties to be the work force for the fledgling colony. One such convict was John (Red) Kelly who was transported for stealing 2 pigs in Ireland and arrived in Hobart Town in 1842. Eventually he received his Certificate of Freedom and moved to Victoria where he met and married Ellen. Soon after his first son was born in 1855 – Edward Kelly and better known as Ned. I was enthralled to read of the link to the Ned Kelly story and a long way from Melbourne and north eastern Victoria. Ned Kelly was oulawed and eventually hung at the Old Melbourne Gaol where in 1880.

    Today the buildings contain a well stocked book/gift shop; a small but excellent museum housing various and very interesting artifacts; the former Supreme Court last used in 1975 and includes the tunnel entrance used by those on trial; a beautiful 1834 tower used as an entrance to the chapel; the former and never consecrated chapel; thirty-six solitary confinement punishment cells, an execution yard – the gaol was the site of 32 executions including one woman. The last person hanged in Tasmania was in 1946 details of all hangings at the former gaol at http://www.penitentiarychapel.com/html/executions.htm

    Depending on your interest in old prisons, my suggestion is to arrive at least an hour ahead of the intending tour, pay the admittance fee and spend the waiting time in the museum, which includes a number of sculptures that vividly portray the past of the fascinating building. Perhaps you may have seen an arrow on prisoners and convicts clothing – all is explained in the museum.

    I was particularly fascinated with the unique hook system for the hanging apparatus trap door. Once activated by lever the trap door would open downwards and swing away from the condemned person. The ‘hook’ was designed to secure the trap door in the open position without allowing it to swing back. If it had done so the official witnesses to the execution may have incorrectly believed the person was still alive and violently moving – shudder.

    The hard working National Trust of Tasmania volunteers conduct tours, which is the only way of viewing the interior of the buildings - Sunday to Friday; 10am. 11.30 am. 1pm. & 2.30pm; Saturday: 1pm & 2.30pm only. Tours last around 75 minutes and are very well presented. Prices – adults $12, Children $5, concession card and various other card holders $10. There is a family pass for $25 Free car parking available.

    The Hobart Penitentiary Chapel is part of a ‘convict trail’ that includes the more famous Port Arthur penal colony, the former and very intact Richmond Gaol and the chilling history as so vividly told in the Australian classic novel ‘For The Term of his Natural Life,’ Sarah Island near the town of Strahan on the west coast. (Tips on the latter 2 – Hobart for the Richmond Gail and Strahan for Sarah Island)

    The web site below is excellent and does include details of their spooky sounding ghost tours that are conducted Monday and Friday evenings only - children 8 and under not permitted (wonder why - LOL).

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