Parks / Gardens / National parks., Hobart

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  • Arthur Circus.
    Arthur Circus.
    by Adelaide79
  • Arthur Circus - the green in the city.
    Arthur Circus - the green in the city.
    by Adelaide79
  • Historical homes.
    Historical homes.
    by Adelaide79
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    Arthur Circus, Hobart.

    by Adelaide79 Written Feb 28, 2012

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    Historical homes.
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    Arthur Circus, located in beautiful Battery Point, is a circular street filled with historical cottages that once housed the officers of the nearby Battery Point garrison.

    Battery Point was established in 1818 and Arthur Circus was developed in 1837.

    The cottages are in a wonderful condition, privately owned now and the gardens are stunningly filled with roses and other beautiful flowers.

    In the centre of Arthur Circus, much like a road roundabout, is a park filled with trees, grass and children's play equipment. It is amazing to see so much green in the city.

    With just a short walk to Salamanca Markets and Sandy Bay, Arthur Circus is a wonderful place to spend the afternoon. Have a walk around the street and see for yourself.

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    Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens - Hobart

    by The_Downunder_Mob Written Jul 28, 2011

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    Japanese Garden - Botanical Gardens
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    The beautiful Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens are close to the Hobart CBD. A five minute drive will take you just past Government House , across the road from the Tasman Bridge.

    Established in 1818 they cover 13.5 hectares and are definitely worth a morning or afternoon to explore. There is a lovely conservatory, a Japanese garden and other displays.

    The gardens are open free of charge every day. For more information check out the links below.

    http://www.anbg.gov.au/chabg/bg-dir/097.html

    http://www.touringtasmania.info/botanical_gardens.htm

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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    Hobart Botanical Gardens

    by al2401 Updated Mar 31, 2011
    Royal Tasmanian Botanic Gardens - Hobart
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    The beautiful Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens are close to the Hobart CBD. A five minute drive will take you just past Government House , across the road from the Tasman Bridge.

    Established in 1818 they cover 13.5 hectares and are definitely worth a morning or afternoon to explore. There is a lovely conservatory, a Japanese garden and other displays.

    The gardens are open free of charge every day. For more information check out the links below.

    http://www.anbg.gov.au/chabg/bg-dir/097.html

    http://www.touringtasmania.info/botanical_gardens.htm

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    Bonorong Wildlife Park

    by al2401 Updated Mar 31, 2011
    Kangaroo and grown joey - Bonorong Wildlife Park
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    Bonarong Wildlife Park is a showcase of Aussie wildlife. It is not a zoo but a sanctuary established in 1981 for the care of sick and injured wildlife. It is run soley on the generosity of visitors and patrons.

    There are regular shows by the animal keepers and petting, even some cuddling is allowed. They are dedicated to saving the Tasmanian Devil from the Facial Tumor disease which is threatening to wipe out the species.

    Although there are better native animal parks in Australia I enjoyed my visit to Bonarong. The park is clean and the animals are well cared for. The staff are friendly and helpful.

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    The Bruny Island Experience

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 2, 2011
    One of the better views on the trail
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    The cliff top walk is also listed in the Great Short Walks booklet. It’s rated as a 2.5 hour walk and, at the risk of stating the obvious, it is uphill to get to the apex of the cliffs and I recommend you take some fluid with you as it’s about 45 minutes of ascending and then more ups and downs when you’re actually following the line of cliffs.
    However, once there the views are special indeed and as you traverse the cliff top, if you follow the recommended route, they just get better by the minute for the 20 minutes you are at the summit. It’s so dramatic standing above a sheer drop listening to the constant roar of the ocean below echoing up the ramparts. It’s something I never tire of.
    Once you descend you’ll pass a couple of historical sites, one of which explains how 41 whales were landed there as long ago as 1829 and, at this same property, how escaped convicts from Port Arthur raided the place and made off with a pig.
    It was only one of eight whaling station around South Bruny at the time.
    A little later on you’ll learn that penguins and shearwaters share Bruny Island which is unusual for they normally are not noted bedfellows.
    It was not far from here that Captain Cook landed in 1781

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    Awesome Bicentennial Park

    by AusPinay Updated Dec 28, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a good view of teh water and Hobart city centre
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    For spectacualar views of Hobart, go to this park which is adjacent to Mt. Nelson lookout and Signal Station and you will find awesome scenes - coastal and water scens, city scenes, etc.

    It was worth taking the bus trip here as we were pressed for time. We did not make it to the other lookout due to the foggy weather- we're supposed to also go to Mt. Wellington but as I heard it has similar views! So it was a good thing we made it here!

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    CAPTIVATING VIEWS from MT.NELSON LOOKOUT

    by AusPinay Written Dec 25, 2009

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    city view from the lookout
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    This place is fabulous as it provides a fabulous panorama of the city of Hobart and the entrance to the Derwent River.

    Mt Nelson is easily accessible by car. The more quiet drive to the summit is the drive up Nelson Road opposite the entrance to the Wrest Point Hotel Casino on Sandy Bay Road. Public transport is available. There is a restaurant at the lookout. We did not try it as we just had our big brekky at the ship!

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    Seven Mile Beach

    by iandsmith Written Mar 20, 2009

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    Late storm clouds roll in
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    Seven Mile Beach is located at the rear of Hobart's airport. Its main use is for people wanting to stroll along the sands or have picnics.
    There's a National Parks office right at the entry to the main area which is located adjacent to the village.
    As you come down the road to get there you turn left for the national park or right for the village.

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    Dockside parks

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Summer blooms

    Parliament House Gardens are located adjacent to the historic Salamanca area; in fact, if you're visiting the markets there's a fair chance you'll walk right next to them.
    They have, at the right time, sweeping annual displays with mature oaks, elms, limes and plane trees; some up to 150 years old.
    This little park adjacent to the Hobart Parliamentary House is a great place to sit down, relax and watch the time pass by.
    They had a display of Da VInci machines taking up some of the room when I was last there.
    However, with its beautiful lawns and tall shady trees, it's guaranteed to put you in a relaxed state of mind.
    You may get to see some famous Hobart official (not that you'd necessarily recognize him/her) or other Australian politician leaving the building.

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    Botanical Gardens

    by iandsmith Updated Mar 15, 2009

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    Carved from pieces of single tree
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    The best things in life are free; so the saying goes and the Botanical Gardens in Hobart certainly add credence to that statement.
    The Gardens are open every day from 8am to 5pm/6.30pm and entrance is free.
    There's a visitor's centre with giftshop and restaurant inside the gardens and a toilet nearby. More often than not there's an exhibition on to add even more to your visit. Spring is obviously a good time, along with autumn but these shots were all taken in late summer.
    You can catch a bus from the CBD or the red tourist bus regularly stops outside the gate.
    They have an eclectic display of varied vegetation from around the world and it's situated on a hillside with nice veiws over the Derwent.

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    SAINT DAVID'S PARK

    by balhannah Written Sep 25, 2008

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    The
    2 more images

    This pioneer cemetery is located next to Salamanca Place. It is the original site of the first Hobart cemetery. A lot of the graves have been put together in a wall. There are quite a few people here of importance, this was very interesting. Its set in a nice setting, with interesting headstones.

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    Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

    by bijo69 Written Jan 31, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lily Pond

    The lovely Botanical Gardens are definitely worth a visit. Although not very large, they display a wide variety of plants and flowers. Pay special attention to the collection of native Tasmanian plants, which includes many rare species.
    There's a visitor's centre with giftshop and restaurant inside the gardens.
    The Gardens are open every day from 8am to 5pm/6.30pm and entrance is free.

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    A breather in the City: Franklin Square

    by xuessium Updated Oct 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    FranklinSquare

    There are plenty of parks and greens in Hobart, big & small.
    A central feature of this site is a statue of the great explorer, Sir John Franklin, serenaded by a majestic fountain.

    Located in the centre of Hobart and surrounded by Macquarie, Elizabeth and Davey Streets.
    This was the site of the first Government House.

    Magnificent oak trees provide shade for visitors who have come to enjoy the area. A great place to rest some tired feet or catch a breather before you continue your exploration of Hobart.

    There is ample seating and public convenience facilities are located on the Elizabeth Street frontage of the Square.

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    Must see for Canadian's at least.

    by seamandrew Written Sep 5, 2004

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    A moument from Canada to Australia.

    At Princes Park, you'll find a monument that honors the memory of 92 exiles transported from Canada to Van Diemen's land in 1840. Their struggle was a significant factor in the evolution of responsible government in Canada and Australia.

    Unveiled by the Canadian High Commissioner Brian Schumacher on the 12th of December 1995 during the Centenary year of official Canada-Australia trade relations.

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    Princes Park and the Batteries

    by seamandrew Written Sep 5, 2004

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    A lousy picture, but a lovely park!

    When former Governor Sorell arrived in Hobart in 1817, he found the town defenseless, and ordered the construction on Battery Point of the Mulgrave Battery. Hastily built, it was described as 'a poor pitifiul mud fort', armed with old and decrepit ships' guns and with poor visibility over the Derwent.
    Governor Franklin, arriving in 1836, found the town still defenseless and after a panic in 1841 when French and American whaling ships visited Hobart (England's enemies at the time), another battery was begun. The Prince of Wales Battery, mounted with ten guns was completed behind the Mulgrave Battery also poorly sited, with limited visibility and vulnerable to enemy fire from the side.
    In 1854, with the Crimean War alert, the Albert Battery was built behind the Prince of Wales Battery. Following tradition, it too was poorly sited and poorly equipped.
    Both batteries were condemened in 1878 and dismantled. There is no record of what happened to the guns but in 1882 the Battery Reserve was handed over to the City Council as a recreation ground.
    In spite of considerable work and expense Hobart was effectively defenseless throughout this period. Ironically, the only time the port was ever of any foreign interest was before the town was founded.
    Today Princes Park is a lovely park with a great view of the water and it's sloping landscape is an excellent place to sit back and relax.

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